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Publication numberUS2464069 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 8, 1949
Filing dateJul 5, 1946
Priority dateJul 5, 1946
Publication numberUS 2464069 A, US 2464069A, US-A-2464069, US2464069 A, US2464069A
InventorsBenson Roy G
Original AssigneeBenson & Associates Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle carrier
US 2464069 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. e. BENSON BOTTLE CARRIER March 8, 1949.

Filed July 5, 1946 Patented Mar. 8, 1949 BOTTLE CARRIER Roy G. Benson, lerwyn, 11]., assignor to Benson & Associates, Inc, Cook County, IlL, a corporation of Illinois Application July 5, 1946, Serial No. 681,583

4 Claims. 1

This invention relates to containers and more particularly to containers for glass bottles or jugs containing hazardous chemicals.

The present day conventional method of protecting against breakage of acid bottles and the like when transporting or handling such bottles is to place them in wooden crates or boxes which may or may not be packed along the sides and bottoms with sawdust. The difficulties experienced with such conventional types of containers any splashing on the person or property adjacent to the bottle.

Another object of this invention is to provide a container whereby the contents of the bottle may be emptied or filled without removal of bottle from container.

A further object of this invention is to provide a container which is made of light weight chemically resistant impregnated fabric.

Another object of this invention is to provide a container which cushions the bottle against shock.

A further object of this invention is to provide a container which is lined with removable shock absorbing material in the base and in the sides.

Another object of this invention is to provide a container which is readily collapsible and when empty will occupy a minimum amount of space.

A further object of this invention is to provide a container with an inner removable rigid base.

Another object of this invention is to provide a carrier with removable padding which may be readily washed and cleaned.

Other objects and advantges of the invention will be apparent during the course of the following description:

In the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification, and in which like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the same:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the carrier containing the bottle.

Figure 2 is an exploded perspective view showing in detail the carrier and the bottle.

Figure 3 is the perspective view of a section of the carrier, showing in detail the construction of the base of the carrier.

Referring to Figure 1, the carrier I is constructed of chemically compounded synthetic rubber impregnated on heavy fabric. This material is pliable, resistant to most acids and alkalies, as well as most chemicals. All seams are vulcanized, thus making the carrier leakproof, as well as impervious to broken glass. Thus, in the event of breakage, the contents are retained in the carrier and prevents the spillage of said acid, alkali. dyes, inks, and chemicals carried in bottles. The upper portion of the carrier is fitted with a series of grommets 2 through which drawstring 3 is laced. The top of the carrier may be closed by tightening drawstring 3 and held firmly in closed position by means of rubber keeper 4, thus it is readily seen that splashing and spilling is prevented by tightening of the drawstring in the manner heretofore described. The drawstring arrangement also allows for easy opening and closing of the carrier. The flexible upper ortion of carrier may be bent back to permit pouring of chemicals from bottle Without first removing the bottle from the carrier.

Surrounding the carrier l, and running the full length, as well as the base of the carrier, are two flexible straps 5 preferably made double the thickness of the material from which the bottle carrier is constructed. These straps are preferably disposed in planes at right angles to one another and are vulcanized to the carrier from a point approximately at the center of the bag, down through and including the base. The flexibility of straps 5 permits the straps to be pushed downwardly out of the way when inserting or removing a bottle in the carrier, or when emptying the bottle contained in carrier. Another strap 6 is wound circumferentially around the carrier and over the straps and vulcanized to straps 5 and carrier, for the purpose of giving greater strength and adherence of straps 5 to carrier I.

The lower portion of Figure 2 illustrates carrier I in an open position without its contents. Straps 5 are there shown folded away from the top of the carrier. Directly above carrier 2 in Figure 2 is shown the removable rigid disc 1, preferably made of laminated glass. When rigid disc 1 is inserted in the bottom of the carrier, it provides stiffening to the base. Directly above disc I in Figure 2 is a disc 8 preferably made of mechanical sponge rubber. It is desirable to make this disc extra thick as most shocks are transmitted through the base due to careless lowering of the bottle. Disposed above mechanical sponge rubber disc 8 is a removable cylindrical padding 9, preferably made of the same mechanical sponge rubber as removable disc 8. It is not necessary that cylinder 9 be as thick as disc 8. The height of cylinder 9 is approximately the height of the bottle. At the top of Figure 2 is illustrated a typical bottle ID for carrying acids, alkalis, and other corrosive chemicals, and may be of the standard pint reagent size or the one gallon size.

I do not intend to limit myself to a specific size bottle as the size and shape of the carrier will vary according to the type of bottle to be placed therein.

Figure 3 illustrates in greater detail the construction of the straps 5 to the base of carrier I. For additional support, a reinforcing disc H is vulcanized directly over straps 5 to the bottom of carrier I.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that I have provided a light weight, splashproof, cushioned carrier for conveniently transporting glass bottles containing injurious chemicals. This carrier is provided with removable padding and stiffening which facilitates washing and cleaning as well as packaging when empty.

While I have shown and described a few embodiments of my invention, this is illustrative only and in no Way limits the scope of my invention. My invention is limited solely by and in the following claims, in which I wish to claim the features inherent therein.

I claim:

1. A bottle carrier comprising an elongated, flat bottomed, leak-proof bag of flexible fabric resistant to chemical action, a thick, flat, resilient, removable, shock'absorbing disk, a thick, cylindrical, resilient, removable, shock-absorbing inner liner of a size to fit snugly within the bag and of a length corresponding approximately to the length of the cylindrical portion of a bottle to be carried, said bag comprising a segment extending above the liner corresponding approximately to the length of the neck of a bottle to be carried, closure means in said segment to draw the segment together above said liner, and flexible handle means for carrying said bag.

2. A carrier for transporting bottles of corrosive liquids comprising a pliable, cylindrical, substantially flat-bottomed, open-topped bag, said bag being sealed at sides and bottom to render it leakproof, said bag being of pliable, tough fabric resistant to chemicals, flexible handle means for carrying said bag, a thick, flat, resilient, removable, shock-absorbing disk conforming to the bottom of the bag, a thick, resilient, removable, shock-absorbing, inner liner corresponding approximately to the length of the body of a bottle to be carried, said bag comprising a segment extending beyond said inner liner and means for drawin said segment tightly about the neck of a bottle to be carried.

3. A carrier for transporting bottles of corrosive liquid comprising a pliable, normally opentopped, flat-bottomed bag of a shape corresponding to the cross-sectional shape of the body of a bottle to be carried, said bag being of tough, chemically resistant fabric and being sealed at sides and bottom to render it leakproof, a thick, fiat, resilient, removable, shock-absorbing disk conforming to the bottom of the bag, a thick, resilient, removable, shock-absorbing inner lining shaped to conform snugly to the inside of said bag and extendin part of the length only of the bag, means for drawing the top of the bag together above said liner, flexible handle means for carrying said bag, said handle means extending along the vertical sides and across the bottom of said bag and being attached for a part of its length to the sides of said bag.

l. A carrier for transporting bottles of corrosive liquids comp-rising a pliable, substantially flatbottomed, normally open-topped ba Conforming to the cross-sectional shape of a bottle to be carried, said bag comprising a tough fabric impregnated with rubber to render it acid and alkali resistant, flexible carrying means attached to said bag, a thick, flat, resilient, removable, shock-abe sorbing disk conforming to the bottom of the bag, a thick, resilient, removable, shockeabsorb ing inner liner of a length less than the over-all length of said bag, and means for drawing the top of the bag together above said liner.

ROY G. BENSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 353,021 Davis Nov. 23, 1886 441,228 Cherbonnier Nov. 5, 1890 1,107,283 Gamble Aug. 18, 1914 1,208,728 Bartlett Dec. 19, 1916 1,633,991 Lifton June 28, 1927

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2724494 *Mar 24, 1953Nov 22, 1955Christian F GraffFood carriers
US2772801 *Oct 28, 1954Dec 4, 1956Jesse SchwortzBaby bottle protective harness
US3225806 *Jun 7, 1962Dec 28, 1965Atlantic Prod CorpCarrying bag construction
US3315857 *Apr 6, 1965Apr 25, 1967Eclov Hjalmar PBag carrier
US3507312 *Dec 18, 1967Apr 21, 1970Petersen Joy TFabric dish and pan holder
US3739731 *Aug 5, 1970Jun 19, 1973Tabor POpen enclosure for explosive charge
US3750869 *Jun 9, 1971Aug 7, 1973Norman Kartiganer IncCombination carrying case and wig stand
US3844460 *Jan 4, 1973Oct 29, 1974Courtright AHolder for can or bottle of beer or other beverage container
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/466, 383/95, 215/12.1, 86/50, D07/624.1, 383/94, 383/121.1, D09/455, D03/202
International ClassificationB65D23/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65D23/104
European ClassificationB65D23/10D