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Publication numberUS2464571 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 15, 1949
Filing dateMar 11, 1948
Priority dateMar 11, 1948
Publication numberUS 2464571 A, US 2464571A, US-A-2464571, US2464571 A, US2464571A
InventorsGardner Herbert S
Original AssigneeTrimfoot Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe-fit indicator
US 2464571 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 15, 1949. H. s. GARDNER SHOE-FIT INIGATOR 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 11,. 1948 INVEN'IOQ. HRBE RT S. GARDNER waag ,1 'rrUR NE Y March 15, v1949. H. s. GARDNER 2,464,571

SHOE-FIT INDICATOR s shuts-sheet 2 Fned March 11, 1948 NI/EN'IOR. HERBERT s. GARvNER March 15, 1949.

Filed March 11., 1948 H. s. GARDNER 2,464,571

sHoE-FIT INDICATOR 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR.

' Hanse-Rr s. GARDNER BY WASP@ ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 15,1949

SHOE-FIT INDICATOR y Herbert S; Gardner,'New York, N. Y., assignor to Trimioot Company, poration of Missouri Application 'March n, 194s, serial No. 14.219

This invention relates to shoe-fitting arrangements, and more particularly to arrangements for tting childrens shoes.

Among the objects of the invention are arrangements for fitting childrens shoes which are very 5 simple in use and enable the mother, or in gen eral the parent, to obtain a visible danger warning when the childs toes have grown or slipped forward into the danger zone ofthe shoe where they 1s claims. (ci. sis-1) Fig. 9 is a plan view of the inwardly facing forward sole part of the shoe of Fig. 8; Figs. 9-A and 9B are views similar to Fig. 9

marking elements lof the invention;

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 9, showing the of the same shoe provided with other .forms ofconditions within the same shoe after the childs foot has grown so that its toe part projects into are in dan-ger of becoming deformed if the child l0 continues to wear the shoes. An important and distinct object of this invention is a shoe-tting indicator arrangement which enables the parent to obtain easily and accurately,

at any time during the useful wearing ageof a 15 childs shoe, visible information of the position of the-childs foot and its toes within the shoes showing the actual location of the toes in relation to the forward danger z one of the associated shoe. v

'I'he foregoing and other objects of the invention will be best understood from the following description of exempliiications thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings wherein: Fig. 1 is a perspective view of one form of a childs shoe combined with a shoe-fitting arrangement of the invention, the forward portion of the upper being cut away to show the inner surface of the forward sole part and the markingsole surface member being provided wth marking elements in accord-ance with the principles of the invention;

Fig. 2l is a longitudinal cross-sectional view through the shoe of Fig. 1;

Fig.'3 is a plan view of the interiorly facing side of the marking member of the shoe of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 of another form of marking member of the invention;

Fig. 5 .is a view similar to Fig. 3 of a modied form of marking member of the invention;

Fig. 5--A is a cross-sectional view along lines 5-A--5-A of Fis. 5:

Fig. 5-B is a view similar to of a modified form of shoe-itting marking member;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 4, of another form `of marking member based on the principles of the invention;

Fig. 7 is a cross-sectional view along lines 1-1 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a childs shoe with the forward end of the upper cut free at the sole and bent upwardly to show the interior surfaces of the forward part of the sole and of the upper both provided with another form of marking element based on the principles of the invention;

the danger zone of the shoe;

Fig. 11 isja. view similar to Fig. 9 of the same shoe provided with another form of marking element of the invention; and -V ,f

Figs. 12 and 13 are cross-sectional views of a sole part of the shoe provided with two forms of marking elements of the invention.

The health authorities and the shoe industry long haverecogni'zed that serious injuries are caused to growing feet of children as a result of their wearing shoes after they'have become too 0 short, or in general. after the safe wearing life of the shoe has been reached.

In most cases, the changed conditions within a shoe 'begin to take place after the child has worn the shoe for only a, very short time.

Prior to the present invention there was not available .any readily accessiblemeans by which the parent couldv accurately detect the danger to which the' child is subjected by the change in the position of the toes within the shoe caused by the growth of the childs foot.`

Although many shoetores have available radiographic or X-ray tting devices for showing on a fluorescent screen the location of the fleshy parts and bones of the toes in relation to the forward part of the shoe within which the childs foot was placed, such stores do not as a rule have any photographic equipment by means of which a photograph` of the foot within the shoe can be throughout the period the shoe is worn.' a, visual indication of the position of the childs toes in relation to the danger zone of the shoe. In general, in accordance with the invention, the interior of the forward or toe' part of the shoe is provided with marking means either on the inward surface of the sole or on the inward surface of the upper or on both. and arranged so as to appiy to the toe of the foot a visible mark indicating the relation of the toe part of the foot to the danger zone of the shoe.

In accordance with one phase of the invention, such sole marking element is provided on' a removable sole marking member of the invention which is shaped to conform to the shape of and to snugly iit the inner-sole of the shoe, so that when it is placed within the shoe-at any time during the period of useful wear of the shoe-it will occupy the same position as the inward surface of the sole or of the inner-sole which forms a permanent part ofthe shoe and each shoe is supplied with such removable sole marking member. This enables the parent to preserve the removable sole-marking member for use whenever the parent desires to obtain in a similar manner a visual picture of the childs toes within the shoe and their relation to the danger zone.

Any of a number of generally known and used marking substances may be embodied in or applied to the marking element. For instance. the marking substance may be formed veither of colored lipstick, crayon. chalk, or of rcolor substances which are used in making chalk or crayon, or of color substances used in making a backing for'duplicating papers such as carbon- A type duplicating papers, or releasable dye substances which when deposited on an inwardly facing surface of a sole or upper member of a shoe, will apply such dye substance to the toe portion of the foot when it -is placed within the I shoe. Furthermore, any common color .pigment such as is used in water color painting may be mixed with water and applied to the surface of the marking element. By using a marking substance of a red or similar brilliant color, a mark leftby the toes will readily attract the attention of the parent the first time the danger zone of the shoe is invaded. Care should be taken that the marking substance should not be made of a dye or the like which is of an indelible character,

4 shoe. In the shoe shown in Figs. 1 to 3, 'the in wardly facing surface of the sole Il is shown provided with a transverse danger zone boundary line 22 and the part of the shoe extending forward beyond boundary line 22 constitutes the danger zone.

In the case of childrens shoes. new shoes should be so fitted as to provide a safety zone between the border of the danger zone facing the toes and the forward end of the region occupied' by the toes of properly iltted new shoes. so as to provide a region which may be occupied by the v rapidly growing feet of the child before they reach line 23,

y Figs. 1 to 3, the marking element 24 is arranged the danger zone into which they should not advance. In the shoe shown in Figs. 1 to 3, the in wardly facing surface of the sole i1 is shown provided with a transverse safety-zone boundary and the part of theshoe extending from the safety-zone .boundary line 22 to the danger zone boundary line is the safety zone 2l of th Shoe.

In the particular form of the invention combined with the shoe of Figs. 1 vto 3, a portion of the inward side of the forward or toe part of the sole 2| is provided with a marking element 24 in the form of a colored marking strip arranged to apply a visible toe mark to the facing side of a toe portion of the foot placed'within the shoe for indicating the relation. of the toe part of the foot to the danger zone of the shoe. In the shoe of 'the facing sole surface in front of the safetybut it should be one which may be readily washed oiI either from the foot or from the stocking.

'I'he marking elements may be formed either of a stripe or an area section extending across a smaller or larger part of the width of the shoe, or by one or more dot-like marks arranged across the width of the shoe.

One specific way of practicing the invention will now be described in connection with Figs. 1

to 3 of the drawings, which show one of a pair of childs shoes equipped with an identical shoe'- tting indicator arrangement exemplifying the invention. The shoe has the usual upper, generally designated Ill, and the usual sole, generally designated i5. In the form shown, the upper I0 comprises an exterior upper member il made of a pliable material such as leather, and an inner lining I2 of fabric, for instance, which is secured to the inner side of the upper member il.

The sole I5 has an outer sole member I6, and Y zone border line 23 and produce thereon toe position marks such as indicated in Figs. i'and 3 by dash-line 21, which shows the position assumed by the toes when the foot has assumed its wearing position within the shoe.

In the form of the invention shown in Figs. 1 to 3,'the marking element strip 24 extends across the entire width of the inward sole surface 2| or that portion occupied by the ilrst or second toe, with the result that the toe marks imparted by the sole marking element 24 to the downwardly facing toe region of the foot entering the shoe, will be effective in producing on the inward the position occupied by all or the ilrst or second toe when .the foot has assumedits inward wear the lower border of the upper I0 is secured in conventi/ouai manner to the inner side of the outer sole member IB, a conventional inner sole member I1 being secured to the inner side of the outer sole i6 so as to overlap the lower edges of the lining I2. t

Due to the prevailing method of shoe construction the upper part of the shoe is tapered down to the sole, and thus creates a danger zone within the shoe which becomes smaller as it nears 4the position where the upper is attached to the sole. A growing childs toes should never enter the danger zone of this tapered forward end ofthe position within the shoe.

Such fitting arrangement of the invention assures that when the childs foot is placed within the shoe, the toe of the foot slipping forward along a portion of the markingl element 24 will have applied to the front toe part of the foot toe marks formed by the marking substance ap plied thereto by the marking strip 24 and cause the toe marks thus formed, on the toes to deposit the marking substance on the parts of the safety zone reached by the marked toe part of the foot when it has assumed its nal seating or wearing position within the shoe, for instance. after the child has had an opportunity to walk a few minutes with the marking member in the shoe.

In accordance with a significant phase of the invention, the inward facing sole surface layer of the shoe provided with the marking element 24 is made in the form of a removable, selfsustaining sole marking member 2liv having a V boundary corresponding to the boundary of the inner sole surface of the shoe and shaped so that when the removable marking member is inserted in the shoe, it will always occupy the same position relatively to the inner sole surface boundary. of the shoe, and assure that the toe position markings 21, 28 formed thereon by the toes of the foot inserted into the shoe. constitute a correct picture showing the position of the toes in relation to the danger zone of the shoe as seen on-the inward sole surface 2l thereof.

In Figs. l and 3. the toe position marks indicated by dash-line 21 represent the toe position marks produced by the toes on the inward sole surface of the shoe at the time a test was made. The dash-line 28 represents the toe position marks produced on the inward sole surface 2l at the time of an earlier test; and the toe position marks 28 indicate that the shoe provides a suillcient growth zone for the childs feet.

Such self-sustaining sheet-like sole marking member 20, the boundary of which occupies the same positionA as the inner-sole, when inserted into the shoe. may be used by the parent at any time during the useful life of the shoe for obtaining an eilective picture indicating theforward position occupied by the toes when the child wears the shoe.- Each time an additional test is made', the additional coloring matter may with advantage be applied to the toe position marks made by the childs toes on the last previous test, such as toe-position mark 28 (Fig. 3), so that the so-colored previous toe-position mark shall serve as the marking element when performing the additional test.

The'removable sole marking member.with the marking element 24 thereof subjected to such a test, gives an exact picture of the relationship eral sizes, such as the six sizes part and along its marking element 24-l before making the first test.

If desired,'the safety zone may be subdivided by additional subdivision lines, for instance, into i three safety zone sections carrying the imprints Safe wearl month Safe wear 2 months, Safe wear 3 months. as typical indications of the safe-wear life of the particular size of shoe. which might be helpful when making successive tests of the positions of the childs toes within the shoe in the manner described above.

As shown in Fig. 4. a single sheet member may be utilized to provide composite, removable sole marking members with suitable markings to indicate heel boundary lines for difieren-t sizes ofl shoes. The variation in contour of toes and heels, except for length, is negligible in -a range of sevindicated in Fig. 4. thus making it possible to make one composite removable inner-sole as in Fig. 4 for six dierent sizes, each of which will remain in its proper position without shifting.

As long as such removable sole marking member of the invention ts properly along its toe sole part, it will assume and be retained .-in its desired position within the shoe. even if the intermediate portions of -the removable sole marking member, such as the ball region, are narrower than the facing sole surface.

of the toes to the end of the shoe and enables the mother to determine whether the further wear of the shoes will cause damage to the feet, or how much longer it will be safe to wear the shoes.

It might be considered that because the toes in crossing the marking element 24 of the sole marking member 20 would pick up the color on the bottom part of the toe only, the resulting picture of the toes could not show the position of the extreme ends of the toes on the sole. However, actual tests and measurements have shown that the weight of the child walking a few minutes within the tested shoes will cause the toe marks formed on its toes to produce on the sole marking member 20 a toe-position mark correspending to the forward end of the toes within v the shoe in the condition of actual wear.

A good way of obtaining the picture is to have the child put on the shoes in a normal way, with the removable sole marking member 20 placed in position,and wear them for a few minutes, such as iive minutes.

Such sole marking member may be made of leather or plastic; or paper, or generally any pliablesheet material which is stiff enough to assume the contour of the inner-sole surface of the shoe when placed thereover, and the boundary of .whi h gives a picture of the boundary of the inward sole surface 2| on which the childs foot rests when it wears the shoe. l

Fig. 4 shows one commercial form of the inward side lof a removable sole marking member of the invention, generally similar to that described in connection with Figs. 3. The toe part -proximately at the same Vdanger zone boundary line Indeed, it may be desirable to make such removable sole marking member of the invention somewhat narrower at the ball region, in order to facilltate its insertion and removal from its properly fitting position within the shoe. The obvious economy of such composite sole marking member is an important feature of the invention. The' accompanying instructions which may be imprinted on the same sheet, direct the parent to cut out from the sheety the proper size of sole marking member for the particular size of shoe with which it is to be used.

Figs. 5 and' 5-A show another form of a removable sole marking member based on the principles of the invention. I-t comprises a sheet member 30 having a boundary conforming to the boundary of the inner sole surface 2|, so that when placed within the shoe it will -occupy the same position as the inner sole.

On upwardly facing toe portion of the sole marking member 30 there is provided an upward wall projection 22 which is shown located apposition as the forward 22 of Fig. 3... The wall projection 32 constitutes the danger zone bound- -ary member of the sole marking member 3|). The surface 33 of the boundary wall member 32 facing toward the rear of the shoe is provided with a marking substance-such as used on the marking'element 24 of Fig. 3-so that when the toes of the childs foot reach the marking surface l2 of the boundary wall, the marking substance of the rear of the safety 'zone' ving danger zone marking wail may be placed by the mother within the shoe as many tiiies as desired, and she canhave the child wear the shoe for a few minutes for'checking whether the toe parts of the foot have or. have not reached the danger zone.

The upstanding marking wall member I2 may be secured to the inwardly facing side of the sole marking member in any of a variety of ways. The particular form oi' sole marking member Ill shown in Figs. 5 and 5-A is cut from a sheet so as to provide for a folded sheet section indicated in Fig. 5--A by the arrow 34, which separates the forward toe part ofv the inner sole member 3l from the rear part, so that it is merely necessary to fold the intermediate section 34 and unite the facing surfaces of the folded section, -as by cement. to form the upstanding marking wall proy Jection 32.

. Alternatively. as indicated in Fig. 5.-.B, the marking wall member may be made Aof a separate sheet element 32| having a folded bottom portion Il which is secured as by cement to the underlying inwardly facing forward surface portion -of removable sole marking member 3Ii-|, generally similar to that of Fig.

Figs. 6 and 7 show a further modiiic'ation of the sole marking member of the invention. A sole marking member 40, generally similar tothe sole marking member of Fig. 3, has secured to theinwardly facing side of the forward toe prtlon extending above the danger zone, a flexible barrier `nember 4i of ilexible'material such as sponge rubber, fel-t, or the like.v The barrier member 4i has a forward barrier surface I3 carrying the marking substance, and facing the rear space of the shoe. The barrier surface 43 exv tends directly across the danger zone, such as the danger zone boundary line 22 of Fig. 3, so

that when the toes of the child wearing the shoe reach the marking boundary surface 43 of the solemarking member 40, the 4marking substance of -tliev boundary surface 22 will apply a visual mark to the childs toes, and indicate to the parent that the child has outgrown the shoe.

The removable sole marking members of Figs. 5 to 'i do not give a full picture of the childs feet within the shoe-such as supplied by the removable sole marking member of Figs. v1 to i-but they will supply the parent with a warning 11' the-1 childs toe reaches the danger zone, because the color 4of the marking surface 433 of -marking member III (Fig. 5), or the color of the markin surface 43 of the marking member 40 (Fig .6), respectively, will produce an imprint of the'color on the end of the childs toe or sock. It will be noted that the forward danger zoneboundary members 32 and I I of the sole marking members of Figs. 5 to. 7, respectively, are each of a yieldable material which is sufficiently resistant to pressure as to be effective in imparting its marking substance to the childs# toe -when it comes in contact with the boundary marking surface, and yet not have sufficient resistance to injure the toe.

A pair of removable sole marking members of the invention, such as those described in connection with Figs. 1 to 4, or Figs. 5 to '1, may be supplied with advantage with each pair of shoes sold or delivered for use by a child, and packed in the same carton with the shoes, so that the parent may have the marking members available for obtaining eithe'r an exact picture of the childs foot with respect to the end region of the shoe. or an indication whether the toes of the childs feet have reached the danger zone.

Figs. 8 to 10 show another form of shoe exempllfying 'the invention. In the shoe Z-Il. 5 the-inwardly facing.A surface 2-Ii of the-sole member 2-I2 is provided wtih a series of marking elements I-II, Z-IB, 2-I6, 2i1, 2-Il extending along the toe region of the shoe so that the edges 2I9 of the several marking elements l0 2--i4 to 2-II facing the toes of the foot shall constitute the forward border line of the danger zone of the shoe generally designated 20, into which the toes of a child wearing the shoe should I never extend if protection against injury is to 15 be assured.. The inwardly facing surface 2-2i f of the upper 2-22 of the shoe 2-i0 is shown provided with a series of corresponding marking \eiements 234. 2-35.l etc. The marking elements 2I4.2i ete.. and 2"-34, 245; embody the o marking substance which will be applied to the' toes reaching the marking element of the shoe.

Assuming that the position occupied by the for- .ward ends of the toes, shown in Fig.l 9, is their position in newly fitted shoes, the region between the inward edges 2--ie of the several marking elements 2 Il, 2-I5, ete., and the forward ends of the toes, constitutes such safety zone generally designated 25, of thetoe part of the shoe.

Instead of a series of separate danger zone so marking elements arranged in the manner described above in connection with Figs. 8 and 9, each ofthe inwardly'facing surfaces of the upper 2-22 andof the sole I-I2-'or only one of' said surfaces-may be provided with a single danger zone marking element of a suitable shape so as' to be engaged by theforward toe part of the foot when it outgrows the shoe. This is indicated in Fig. 9-A for the sole part ofthe shoe. the inner surface -of which is shown provided with only one 40 marking element i4 located in front of the big toe 30 of the foot.

. Alternatively.- each of the inwardly facing surfaces of the upper 2-22 and of the sole 2-I2 or only one of said surfaces-may be provided 4;, with a stripe-like danger zone marking element. This is indicated `in Fig. 9-B for the sole part of the shoe, in which a stripe-like danger zone marking element 2-5i extends across the-area of the danger zone of the sole'member 2i2 and embodies al suitable marking substance which imparts a visible signal mark to the toe part of the foot which has outgrown the shoe.

A. childs shoes provided with danger zone marking elements 2-i4 to 2-i8 such as shown in Fig. 9, or one marking element as shown in Fig. 9-A or 9-B, will assure that whenever, in the course of the rapid growth of the childs feet the toes start to enter the danger zone of the danger marking elements, such as elements Z-I or 2-5|, they will apply to the toes, or to the toe part of the stocking worn on the foot, a visually observable mark giving a positive indication that further wear of the shoes will be dangerous. and that the Achild should be fitted with new shoes.

Fig. 10 shows the same toe part of the shoe as. Fig. 9, but after a period of growth of the feet has caused the toes 2-30 of the foot to advance into the danger zone in which the front portions of the toes overlap the edge regions 2-I9 of the marking elements 2-I4 to 42e-I8, thus bringing about an automatic marking of the toes with the visible marking substance of the marking elements 2-I4 to 2I8. and givingthe parent a signal that the child requires new shoes.

In practice it may be sufficient to provide the shoe with only one danger zone such as described in connection with Figs. il-A and 9 B. because ya-mark made on one of the toes. such as the big toe, will be sufficient to indicate that the childs feet have outgrown the shoe.

The principles of the invention described above in connection with Figs. 8 through 10. may also be applied for providing the shoes with marking elements which give a visible indication that the toe part of the shoe is still in the safety zone or growth zone 2 2! of the shoe.

In Flg.,11 the safety zone 2 25, of the same kind of shoe as shown in Figs. 9 and 10. is provided with a series of safety zone marking elements 2 44, 2 45, 2 4l, 2 41, 2 42, extending across the safety zone of the inwardly facing surface 2 I I of the sole member 2 12 of the shoe, parts of the safety markings being partiallyoverlapped by the toes as a result of the growth of the foot since the original fitting. Such safety zone marking 2 44. should be of a different color than the danger zone markings 2 I4through 2 ll. For instance, the danger zone markings may be formed of a red marking substance, and

the safety zone markings of a green marking substance.

Fig. 9 B shows the entire region of the safety zone arranged to serve as a safety zone marking element 2$i, and embodying a marking substance of a color different from the marking substance of the danger zone 2 52 of the shoe.

Fig. 12 shows how a portion of the inner-sole forming the upwardly facing surface 2 ll of the sole member 2I2 is provided with a danger zone marking element 2 I4, by filling a depression or a hole in the upwardly facing surface ofthe inner sole lining member 2 II with a marking substance, such as chalk. The purpose of this is to provide a reservoir of the marking substance which continues to give warnings in case the parent does not heed the warning before the surface elements have rubbed off.

Fig. 13 shows how' the upwardly facing surface 2-2i of such sole member 2-I2 may be provided with a danger zone marking 2 -5I by uniting thereto, as by cement, a thin layer of a suitable marking substance, such as used on the back of colored duplicating papers.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the novel principles of the invention disclosed herein in connection with specic exempliilcations thereof will suggest various other modiilcations and applications of the same. It is accordingly desired that in construing the breadth .of the appended -claims they shall not be limited to the specific exemplications of the invention described above.-

I claim: l

1. In combination with a shoehaving a toe surface region facing the interior of the shoe and also having a forward interior danger zone into which the foot should not enter, at least one surface marking element exposed along said toe surface region across at least a portion of the width .of the sole area so as to face and become engaged by a toe portion of the foot placed within the shoe in accordance with the relation of said toe portion to said danger zone, said marking element embodying a visually observable marking substance which is applied to the toe portion of the foot engaged thereby to form thereon a visible toe mark for providing a visible indication of the wearers toes in relation to the danger zone of the shoe.

10 2. In combination with a shoe having a toe surface region facing the interior of the shoe and also having a forward interior danger zone into which the foot should not enter, at least one suri'ace marking element exposed along said toe into which the foot should not enter, at least one marking member 'shaped and arranged to be held on at least a portion of the sole area facing the interior of the shoe and having on the interiorly facing toe-surface region a marking element exposed along said toe-surface region so as to face and become engaged by a toe portion ofthe Afoot placed within the shoe in accordance with the relation of said toe portion to said danger zone, said marking element embodying a visually observable marking substance which is applied to the toe portion of the foot engaged thereby to form thereon a visible toe mark for providing a visible indication of the position of 'the wearers toes in relation to the danger zone of the shoe.

f1.' In a shoe-nt indicator for a shoe having a toe-surface region facing the interior of the shoe and also having a forward danger zone thereof into which the foot should not enter, at least one marking member shaped and arranged to be held on at least a portion of the sole area facing the interior of the shoe and having on the interiorly facing toe-surface region a. surface marking element exposed along said toe-surface region across at least a portion of the width of the sole area so as to face and become engaged by a toe portion lof the foot placed within the shoe in accordance with the relation of said toe portion to said danger zone, said marking element embodying a visually observable marking substance which is applied to the toe portion of the foot engaged thereby to form thereon a visible toe mark for providing a visible indication of the position of the wearers toes in relation to the danger zone of the shoe.

5. In a shoe-nt indicator for a shoe having a toe-surface region facing the interior of the shoe and also having a forward danger zone thereof into which the foot should not enter, at least one marking member shaped and arranged to be removably held and fit on at least a portion of the sole area facing the interior of the shoe and having on the interiorly facing toe-surface region a marking element exposed along said toe-surface region sonas to face and become engaged by a toe portion of the foot placed within the shoe in ac-v cordance with the relation of said toe portion to said danger zone, said marking element being arranged to retain a visually observable marking substance which is applied to the toe portion of the foot engaged thereby to form thereon a visible toe markfor providing a visible indication of the position of the wearers toes in relation to the danger zone of the shoe.

6. A shoe-fit indicator as dened by claim 5, in which the marking member is shaped to extend and t over substantially the entire inwardly facing sole area of the shoe, and is arrangedto be held in position thereover.

'7. A shoe-fit indicator as defined in claim 6, in .which the marking member is provided with a barrier element projecting upwardly from the forward toe .portion of the marking member and which yields when engaged and'- pressed by the forward toe portion of the foot lplaced within the shoe.

9. In a shoe-fit indicator for a shoe having a toe-surface region facing the interior of the shoe and also having a forward danger zone thereof into which the foot should not enter, at least one marking member shaped and arranged to be removably held and nt on at least a portion of the sole area facing the interior of the shoe and having on the interiorly facing toe-surface region a surface marking element exposed along said toe-surface region across at least a portion of the width of the sole area so as to face and become engaged by a toe portion of the foot placed within the shoe in accordance with the relation of said toe portion to said danger zone, said marking element being arranged to retain a visually observable marking substance which is applied to the toe portion of the foot engaged thereby to form thereon a visible toe mark for providing avisible indication of the position of the wearers toes in relation to the danger zone of the shoe.

10. In a shoe-fit 'indicator for a shoe having a toe-surface region facing the interior of the shoe and also having a forward danger zone thereof into which the foot should not enter, at least one marking member shaped and arranged to be removably held and nt on at least a portion of the sole area facing the interior of the shoe and having on the interiorly facing toe-surface region a marking element exposed along said toe-sun tace region so as to face and become engaged by a toe portion of the foot placed within the shoe in accordance with the relation of said toe portion to said danger zone, said marking element being arranged to retain a visually observable marking substance which is applied to the toe portion of the foot engaged thereby, and being spaced rear- I wardly from the forward part of the marking member so that lwhen the foot is placed within the shoe the marking sufbstance'of the marking element will apply a toe mark to the toe portion of the foot reaching itv and the toe portion of the foot will apply the marking substance of the toe mark to the facing surface of the forward part oi' the marking mem-ber for producing thereon a visible indicator marking which indicates said marking element being arranged tol retam a visually observable marking substance which is applied to the toe portion of the foot engaged thereby and being spaced rearwardly from the f' y forward part of the marking member so that -when the foot is placed within the shoe the marking substance of the marking element will apply a toe mark to the toe portion of thefoot reaching it and the toe portion of the foot will apply the marking substance of the toe mark to the facing surface of the forward part of the marking member for producing thereon a visible marking which indicates the position of the toes in relation to said danger zone of the shoe when the foot has reached its seating position within the shoe.

13. A shoe-nt indicator as dened by claim 12, in which the marking member is shaped to extend and iit over substantially the entire inwardly facing sole area of the shoe, and is arranged to beheld in position thereover.

14. In combination with a shoe having a toesurface region facing the interior of the shoe and extending over a forward danger zone thereof intov which the foot` should not enter, at least one marking element exposed on said toe-surface region along the border of said danger zone facing and engaged by the toes when they reach the danger zone, said marking element embodying a marking substance which imparts a visible mark to the toe portion of the foot engaged thereby for indicating by the marking' substance that the wearers foot has outgrown the shoe.

15. In combination with a shoe having a toesurface region facing the interior of the shoe and extending over a forward danger zone thereof into which the foot -should not enter, 'a surface marking element exposed on said toe-surface region along the border of the danger zone portion 40 facing the forward toe part of the foot, said the position of the toes in relation to said danger zone of the shoe when the foot has reached its seating position within the shoe.

11. A shoe-lit indicator as defined by claim 10, in which the marking member .is shaped to extend and iit over substantially the entire inwardly facing sole area of the shoe, and is arranged to be held in position thereover.

12. In a shoe-fit indicator for a shoe having a toe-surface region facing the interior of the shoe and also having a forward danger zone thereof into which the foot should not enter, at least one marking member shaped and arranged to be removably held and fit on at least a portion of the shoe area facing the interior of the shoe and having on the interiorly facing toe-surface region a surface marking element exposed along said toe-surface region across at least a portion of the width of the sole area so as to face and become engaged by a toe portion of the foot placed within the shoe in accordance with the relation of said toe portion to said danger zone,

marking element embodying a marking sub-- stance which imparts a visible mark to the toe portion of the foot engaged thereby for indicating thereon that the the shoe.

16. The combination with a shoe as defined b'y claim 15, in which the danger-zone on the inwardly facing surface of the sole member is provided with a marking element. y

17. The combination with a shoe as defined by claim 15. in which the danger-zones on the in' wardly facing surface of the upper and the inwardly facing surface of the sole member are each provided with a marking element.

18. In combination with a shoe having a toesurface region facing the interior of the shoe and extending over a forward danger zone thereof into which the foot should not enter. at least two marking elements exposed on said toe-surf wearers foot has outgrown facing the toes` opposite at least two forward toes .of the foot, each of said marking elements ein--4 bodying a marking substance which imparts a visible mark to the toe portion of the footengaged thereby for indicating thereon that the wearers fooi; has outgrown the shoe, the marking substances of said two marking elements being of different colors.

19. In combination with a shoe having a. toe surface region facing the interior of the shoe and extending over a forward danger zone thereof into which the foot should not enter and a safety zone into which the toes of the foot will advance incident to the growth of the foot, at least one `danger-marking element exposed on said surface 13 region sioni the border ot said danza' :ons iacinz and engaged-by the toes when they enter the danser zone. atleast one safety-marking element exposed on the portion o! said safety-sone adjoining the danger-zone, said marking elements embodying max-kin: substances which impart a visible mark to the toe portion oi the tout on- 4 14 und thmbnjho martine substance' of the dancer-marking clement and the' safety-marking element bein; formed of marking substances ot diiierent colors.

HERBERT s. GARDNER.

No Morancos cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2654965 *Sep 1, 1950Oct 13, 1953Gilkerson Marian HShoe with insole exposable to view
US2860416 *Jan 24, 1952Nov 18, 1958Joseph E RuszSeated impression fitting aids
US3022577 *Oct 13, 1960Feb 27, 1962Rockmore Milton MShoe-fit checking device
US3142911 *May 5, 1961Aug 4, 1964Raborg Jessie HAdjustable child's shoe
US4387516 *Dec 22, 1980Jun 14, 1983L & A, Inc.Universal insole
US4931773 *May 5, 1989Jun 5, 1990Rosen Henri EShoe fitting system
US5014041 *Apr 6, 1990May 7, 1991Rosen Henri EShoe fitting system
US5084988 *Apr 13, 1990Feb 4, 1992Puma Ag Rudolf Dassler SportShoe, especially a children's shoe with a transparent sole area
US6279251 *Oct 22, 1999Aug 28, 2001Howard F. DavisSelf-adjusting shoe
US6415530 *Aug 23, 2000Jul 9, 2002H. Kevin CoplonMethod, system and shoe enabling the determination of fit from outside of the shoe
US6523289Mar 1, 2002Feb 25, 2003H. Kevin CoplonSystem and shoe enabling the determination of fit from outside of the shoe
US6748673 *May 30, 2002Jun 15, 2004H. Kevin CoplonMethod, system and shoe enabling the determination of fit from outside of the shoe
US7325335 *Feb 7, 2004Feb 5, 2008Veronica Cook-EuellMethod and apparatus used to communicate a message to be worn in footwear
US7353770 *Dec 6, 2005Apr 8, 2008Sanguinetti CheriVisual wear indicator for footwear
EP1311168A1 *Aug 22, 2001May 21, 2003Kevin H. CoplonMethod, system and shoe enabling the determination of fit from outside of the shoe
WO2002011576A1Aug 2, 2001Feb 14, 2002Ben ByrdShoe sole with sizing indicators
WO2002015731A1 *Aug 22, 2001Feb 28, 2002H Kevin CoplonMethod, system and shoe enabling the determination of fit from outside of the shoe
WO2004055758A2 *Dec 10, 2003Jul 1, 2004Bagir Co 1961 LtdIndicator whether clothing has received proper care
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/1, 36/8.4, 73/172, 33/3.00A, 462/1, 36/43
International ClassificationA43D1/00, A43D1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA43D1/027
European ClassificationA43D1/02D