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Publication numberUS2465250 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 22, 1949
Filing dateJan 26, 1945
Priority dateJan 26, 1945
Publication numberUS 2465250 A, US 2465250A, US-A-2465250, US2465250 A, US2465250A
InventorsMccready Howard W
Original AssigneeEdwin H Tompkins
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Therapeutic device
US 2465250 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

mch 22, 1949. Hfw. MCCREADY v THERAPEUTIC DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Jan. 26, 1945 MarchZZ, 1949. H. w. Meel-READY 2,465,250

TI'IE1:U\.]:"E}U'IICI DEVICE Filed Jan. 26, 1945 l 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

i x y l @l/@MM MZQW Patented Mar. 22, 1949 UNITED STATES `PATENT OFFICE THERAPEUTIC DEVICE Howard W. McCready, New York, N. Y., assgnor to Edwin H. Tompkins, New York, N. Y.

Application January 26, 1945, Serial No. 574,767

8 Claims. (Cl. 12S-46) This invention relates to therapeutic devices of the type in which gyratory impulses are imparted to local zones of the human body.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved device of this type, with which the gyratory impulses imparted to the body will be restricted to a minimum extent by the housing for the device, with which the device may be manipulated and held in the hand without ma#- terially restricting the gyratory impulses transmitted to the body, and which will be relatively small, effective, practical, eicient, compact and inexpensive.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved device for imparting gyratory impulses to local zones of the body, which may be held in the hand and manipulated, with which the means for creating the gyratory impulses Will have a maximum freedom of movement relatively to the housing in which it is incorporated, and by which it is manipulated, with which the part engaging the body may be removed for cleaning and sterilization, and which will have a minimum of assembly operations.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved device for imparting gyratory impulses to a local zone of the body, with which the impulses may be transmitted to the body through .bristles as a brush, or through massage elements or a cushioning pad, as may be desired.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description of one embodiment of the invention, and the novel features will be particularly pointed out hereinafter in connection with the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawing: .y Fig, 1 is a longitudinal, sectional elevatio of a device constructed in accordance With this invention, in the nature of a hairbrush;

Fig. 2 is a transverse, sectional elevation of the same, the section being taken approximately along the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a perspective of portions of certain parts of the device separated from each other and illustrating details of assembly and of the manner of securing the motor plate in position at one end;

Fig. 4 is a plan of the same, with the bristle plate removed;

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of part of a member to replace the bristle carrying plate or member;

Fig. 6 is a similar side elevation of part of another member to replace the bristle carrying plate or member; and

Fig. 7 is a plan of the part of the member shown in Fig. 6.

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention and referring particularly to Figs. 1 `to 4, the improved device includes a hollow housing I having, if desired, a handle 2 extending from one end thereof. The housing has a chamber 3 with an open face 4. A rigid plate 5 is disposed across the chamber -3 adjacent the open face 4 of the housing, so as to close the housing at such open face. The end wall of the housing, opposite from the handle 2, on its inside face is provided with a groove 6 in which is disposed a U-shaped cushion or channel strip 'I. with the groove or channel facing into the chamber and receiving one end edge of the plate 5. The handle 2, on its face toward the open face 4, has a channel 8, see Fig. 3, which extends the full length of the handle and into the chamber 3, and this channel 8 is closed by a handle strip or bar 9, see Figs. 1 and 4, which ts flush in the channel 8 against a shoulder I0. The handle bar 9, has one end forming part of an end wall of the chamber 3, which carries a U-shaped cushion or channel strip II, with the groove or channel facing inwardly and at the level of the plate 5. The adjacent end edge of the plate 5 is received in the groove or channel of the cushion I I.

The cushions I and II are of soft, resilient, easily compressed material such as very soft gum rubber or sponge rubber, and provide the sole and a oating support for opposite end edges of the plate 5. The plate 5, around its entire marginal edge, is spaced from the wall of the chamber 3 so that it floats entirely in the cushions 1 and II. The handle bar 9 is held in place, at one end, by a locking pin I2, shown in Fig. 3 as removed from the handle, which passes Vthrough aligned openings I3 in the handle 2 at opposite sides of the channel 8, but close to the 0 body I, and also through a passage I4 in the adjacent end of the handle bar 9. One or more fasteners I5 pass through the handle 2 into the bar 9 adjacent the free end of the handle. The fasteners I5 may be screws which are threaded into the bar 9.

A small, electric motor I6 has its base I'I secured by lugs I8 and screws I9 to the inner face of plate 5 so that the motor will lie in the chamber 3, closed by the plate 5. Circuit wires 20 for the electric motor extend from the motor through the channel 8 to the free end of the handle where they are connected to terminals 2I carried by a cross bar 22 of insulating material secured in the channel 8 a short distance inwardly from the open end of the channel. These contact posts 2| are concealed entirely vthe motor.

within the handle, but may be reached at the free end of the handle to apply thereover a connector plug by which a connection from an operating circuit may be made to the motor I6.

The motor I6 may be of any suitable type with a shaft 23 mounted for rotation, in the frame of the motor, about an axis which is approximately parallel to the plane of `the plate and extending in a direction lengthwise of .the plate 5, that is, in the dimension of the plate 5 between the ends secured in the cushions l1 and II. The shaft 23 is provided with anaxial unbalance of substantial extent well in excess of any accidental and unintentional unbalance due to inaccuracy of manufacture, so that when the motor operates and shaft 23 rotates .about its axis, the unbalance will cause the entire motor I6 to gyrate in a small, closed looppath parallel to and adjacent the axis of the shaft 23. Since the motor is mounted directly'on the plate 5, such gyrations will be transmitted Yto the plate 5. The motor I6 is spaced .entirely 4from the walls of the chamber 3, so that Lit is floatingly mounted for movement with the plate 5, and thus the motorand plate gyrate together withln the housing.

`The motor is illustrated as of the small, make and break, magnetic type in which an armature `2li is fixed on the shaft 23 for rotation therewith, with its ends moving past the poles .ofa

AU-shaped electromagnet, the winding of which-is `connected in series with a make and break-de- Yvice 25 voperated by a cam lon the shaft v23,to

open the circuit through the electromagnet as the ends of armature 24 closely approach a posi- =tion across the poles of the electromagnet. Inertia carries the armature past the `deadcenter :position with respect to the poles, and after the Varmaturepasses such a position, the cam on the :shaft 23 re-establishes a circuit through the elecftromagnet which'causes another attraction between the armature andthe poles of the electroy'magnet to give the armature a furtherr rotary Aimpulsethat keeps it in motion.

This is a wellknown type of electric motor which has been extensively used inxelectric razors for shavers,iexcept.that the motor used for shavers fand .other k.similar purposes does Vnot have any additional or avoidable axial unbalance. This .unbalance may be easily obtained by applyingan eccentric weight 26 to the rotatable shaft 23 of In this type of motor this added unbalance is easily. obtained by attaching a body 'to one side of thearmature, as shown'in Fig. 2,

it being understood that the added weight or body isof non-magnetic material, such as lead.

An auxiliary plate or member 21, is disposed face to face against the plate 5 at the open .face i4 of the housing. This plateor member'21is 'detachably secured to the plateib in any suitfablemanner, such as by snap fasteners Y28,:-one element of which is carried by the plate 5 and "the other by the abuttingface ofthe memberl.

There are preferably at least twoo'f -suchiaslteners 28, onejadjacenteach end 'of the plate 5. 'The member 21,`when secured tothe plate 5,^is

spaced everywhere from the wall of thechamber '3 at the open face d, so that it contacts only with thegplate 5. Because of this, the member 2'! will partake of the gyrations of the motor and plate 5 which were explained above, If desired, very soft, resilient cushions 29 may be disposed be- '.tween the side edges of the plate 5 and the shoul- `der 3D on the inside wall of the chamber 3. Very 'soft gum rubber and spongerubber, are'excellent materials of which cushions 29 can be made, and since they extend along the sides of the chamber 3 adjacent the open face 4, they prevent any accidental contact of the member 21 directly with the housing I at the open face 4.

The member 21 carries a plurality of groups of bristles 3|, such as are commonly used in halrbrushes,'which extend generally normal to *the `plane 'of'the outer "face of member 21, or transversely of the axis of rotation of the unbal- Ianced shaft 23. Along the end and side edges, the bristle groups 3l may, if desired, be tilted outwardly slightly or sidewise, in a direction away Tirom"the-'otherbristlea as shown in Figs. l and 2.

The bristles f'aresecured in the member 21 in the usual .mannerin which bristles for brushes are secured in a base.

'In aconstruction such as above described and illustrated in Figs. 1 to`4, the brush may be used :in-.the'mannerof an ordinary hairbrush by grasping it atthe .handle2 and sweeping the bristles 3| over-thefskinor scalp in the manner usual `in hairbrushes. .It may beso used even though the motor :I6 is idle. When .a therapeuticaction .is `desirecLzfa circuit connector is applied to the free :endof the handlel over thecontact posts 2 I, which supplies operating current to the motor I5. The motor IIS `then rotatesthe shaft 23, and the axial imbalance of that shaft causes the motor, the Vplate 5, themember 21 and the bristle groups 3l :tofgyratebodily relative to the housing I, even though the housing is held firmly by the handle I2,1or byzone grasping .the housing I. Since the motor'I'gtheplate 5 and the member 21 are all "iioatingly'mounted relatively to the housing, their .'gyrations will not be hampered or restricted by :aflrmfgra'spingnofthe housing Ior its handle 2.

The'gyrations of 'the member 21 and bristle groups3l Will be about axes parallel to the yaxis fof'the shaft 23, and'when the bristle :groups 3l are appliedtothe scalp or to the skin of the body -in 'thelmanner in which brushes yare .ordinarily appliedtothe skin, the bristles will impart ato the scalp or skin, corresponding gyratory impulses-which serve to 'stimulate blood circulation in the scalp-and also stimulate 'the skin Jnerves, or nerve terminals in the skin, on the localsurfa'ce of the'body over which the bristles are v'moved or against which they are pressed. rIt'might ordinarily be expected that such lateral "gyrations of the motor and bristles -would do no fmore'than "ex'thebristles '3I, but it has been v'found that'a rather unusual action on the skin or scalp is caused 'by 'the bristles '3|, which is very different fromthe mere sidewise swishing 'orbrushing ofthe bristles over the scalp that 'occurs when an ordinary brush is moved over the scalp in an ordinary brushing action.

Gyratory impulses transmitted to the body through'the 'bristle'groups 3| not only stimulate 'the local blood circulation through the skin and l'skin layers, v'butvalso cause a relaxation of the vnerveterminalsl in the'skin or adjacent Iparts ,of the body. The-sensation is very pleasing yto the "patient, 'and-it is decidedly different from the effects caused by ordinary vibration'of oscillation' back andforth in'the'same'path that has been a common feature of so many vibratory brushes and therapeutic devices heretofore. The body action and the physical sensation created by'this device are distinctly diierent from those 'created by the ordinary action of a brush, and by vibratory or oscillatory movements oa brush.

vIn the Aembodiment of the invention shown in Fig. 5, the member 21 which replacesv the member 21 carrying the bristle groups 3| as in Figs. 1 to 4, carries a pad 32 which is preferably of sponge rubber or other soft, resilient material, that may be used, if desired, when the device is applied to a part of the anatomy where no brushing action of the hair is required. The pad 32, however, will stimulate local blood circulation in an area against which it is held, when the motor is operated, as well as relax the nerves in the adjacent portion of the body.

In Figs. 6 and 7 the member 21, instead of having the bristle groups 3l or the pad 32, carries a plurality of exible, resilient pins 33 which extend from the outer face of the member 21 in a direction approximately norma] to that face of the member. These pins 33 are quite freely flexible sidewise, and While they may be solid, flexible rubber pins of any suitable diameter, they are preferably tubular and may have somewhat the appearance and characteristics of small pieces of rubber tubing of approximately the Same length disposed endwise against a face of the member 21. When these pins 33 lare applied against a local surface of ones anatomy, they will have a stimulating eiect on that part of the anatomy very much the same as the bristle groups 3| have, but since the pins 33 are somewhat stiffer than the bristles, they transmit ysomewhat stronger gyratory impulses to the body surface against which they are pressed, These pins 33 may be of the same or diierent sizes, and arranged in any suitable order or plan on the member 21.

The plate 5 and member 21 constitute a unit `that may conveniently be termed a member or element which is floatingly mounted in the housing and which is gyrated by the motor I6 with the axial unbalance, but this unit or member is separable into two parts, one of which, such as plate 5, normally remains in the housing to pro 'tect the motor I6 from tampering and from injury due to blows thereagainst or to liquids being spilled thereon, and the other of which, such as member 21, may be detached for cleaning or sterilizing, or for replacement by a member 21 having a pad 32 or flexible pins 33. In the manufacture of the device, the motor may be assembled separately, then attached to the plate 5.

In assembling, the .plate 5 is placed across the housing, and the handle bar 9 applied to the handle and attached thereto, which secures the plate 5 in position and closes the chamber 3 of the housing at the open face. One of the parts 21, with the bristles, pad or exible pins thereon, is then applied by snapping it to the plate 5 by the snap fasteners 28, and the device is then ready for use. These snap fasteners 28 are a very inexpensive and simple means for securing member 21 to the plate 5, but any other form or type of detachable connection between the member 21 and the plate 5 is, of course, contemplated as a part of the invention in its broadest scope. The cushions 1 and Il, and the side cushions 29 are preferably of sponge rubber or a. very soft, resilient gum rubber, but they may, of course, be replaced with any other suitable and available soft cushioning means.

It will be understood that various other changes in the details, materials and arrangements of parts, which have been herein described and illustrated in order to explain the nature of the invention, may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the invention, as expressed in the appended claims.

Iclaim:

1. A therapeutic device comprising a hollow housing having an open face, and a handle extending therefrom in a direction parallel to said open face, said handle having a channel on the same side as the open face of the housing, and extending endwise into the chamber of said housing, a bar detachably coupled to said handle, closing said channel, and having an end portion forming a closure for the opening ofthe channel into said chamber, a soft, resilient cushion carried by said end portion of said bar, another soft, resilient cushion carried by said housing at the opposite side of the chamber, an element supported by said cushions in fully spaced relation to the walls of said housing and bar, an electric motor secured to the inner face of said element and spaced fully from the walls of said chamber, said motor having a shaft driven thereby, with a substantial axial unbalance well in excess of any accidental and unintentional unbalance due to inaccuracy of manufacture, the axis of said shaft being parallel to said open face, and a part extending outwardly from said element beyond said open face for contact with a local zone of the anatomy.

2. A therapeutic device comprising a hollow housing having an open face, and a handle extending therefrom in a direction parallel to said open face, said handle having a channel on the same side as the open face of the housing, and extending endwise into the chamber of said housing, a bar detachably coupled to said handle, closing said channel, and having an end portion forming a closure for the opening of the channel into said chamber, a soft, resilient cushion carried by said end portion of said bar, another soft, resilient cushion carried by said housing at the opposite side of the chamber, an element supported by said cushions in fully spaced relation to the Walls of said housing and bar, an electric motor secured to the inner face of said element and spaced fully from the walls of said chamber, said motor having a shaft driven thereby, with a substantial axial unbalance well in excess of any accidental and unintentional unbalance due to inaccuracy of manufacture, the axis of said shaft being parallel to said open face, a part extending outwardly from said element beyond said open face for contact with a local zone of the anatomy, circuit wires for said motor extending along the channel from said chamber, a member provided across said channel adjacent the free end of the handle, and circuit connectors carried by said last named member so as to extend in a direction outwardly and endwise of the handle, and connected to said circuit wires, said member being conined in said channel by said bar.

3. A therapeutic device comprising a hollow housing having an open face, and a handle extending therefrom in a direction parallel to said open face, said handle having a channel, on the same side as the open face of the housing, and extending endwise into the chamber of said housing, a bar detachably coupled to said handle, closing said channel, and having an end portion forming a closure for the opening of the channel into said chamber, a soft, resilient cushion carried by said end portion of said bar, another soft, resilient cushion carried by said housing at the opposite side ofA the chamber, an element supported by said cushions in fully spaced relation to the walls of said housing and bar, soft, resilient strips extending along the remaining periphery of said element between said'element and the side walls of the housing, an electric motor secured to the inner face of vsaid element and spaced fully from the walls of said chamber, said motor having a shaft driven thereby, with a substantial axial unbalance Well in excess of any accidental and unintentional unbalance due toinaccuracy of manufacture, the axis of said shaft being parallel to said open face, and a part extending outwardly frorn said element beyond said open face for contact with a local zone of the anatomy.

4. A skin stimulating device comprising a housing which may be manipulated and having a chamber therein, an electric motor disposed' in and only partially filling said chamber and having a shaft rotatably driven thereby, the shaft having a substantial axial unbalance well in excess of any accidental and unintentional unbalance due to inaccuracy of manufacture, means resiliently and floatingly mounting said motor within said chamber Afor movement in all direcltions crosswise of the axis of rotation of said shaft, and providing the sole and a floating support of said motor in said chamber, a member extending from said motor to the exterior of said housing, spaced from said housing so as to be free to move with said motor, and terminating outwardly in a relatively broad and generally flat surface approximately parallel to the axis of rotation of said shaft, and a plurality of resilient, freely flexible, elongated elements projecting from said broad surface of said member exteriorly of said chamber for contact with a local zone of the skin to which the gyratory movements of the motor will be imparted as gyratory impulses.

5. A skin stimulatingdevice comprising a housing which may be manipulated and held, and having a chamber therein substantially closed but opening outwardly through an open face, an electric motor disposed in and only partially filling said chamber and having a shaft rotatably driven thereby, the shaft having a substantial axial imbalance well in excess of any accidental and unintentional `imbalance due to inaccuracy of manufacture, a relatively rigid member mounting said motor, spaced from the walls of the chamber, and having an outwardly facing, broad, generally flat face, means resiliently and .floatingly mounting said member, and through it said motor, for movement in all directions cross- `wise of the axis of rotation of the shaft, and providing sole and a floating support for said .motor and member from said housing, an element abutting face to face with said generally fiat face of said member detachably coupled theretdand having an outwardly exposed broad face, and a plurality of resilient, freely exible elongated elements secured at their ends to said outwardly exposed face of said element and projecting side by side therefrom for contact with a local Zone of the skin to transmit thereto impulses received from said motor.

6. A skin Ystimulating device comprising a hollow housing which may be held and manipulated, and having an opening to the exterior, a relatively rigid member within said housing, exposed .through said opening, and free of direct Contact with the housing, soft, resilient cushioning means resiliently and floatingly mounting said member from said housing for movement in all directions relatively to said housing and forming the sole and a floating support of said member, motor -operatcd means carried bysaid member .within the housing and spaced fully from the'wallsif said vhousing for imparting to said member rapid iocal periodic movements of small amplitude,v and va plurality of freely flexible elements projecting from said member, exteriorly of said housing, in side by side relation for contact at their ends with the skin and transmitting thereto impulses received from said motor means.

'7. A skin stimulating device comprisinga hollow housing which may be held and manipulated,

and' having an opening to the exterior, a rela.- tively rigid member Within said housing, exposed through said opening, and free of direct contact with the housing, soft, resilient cushioning means resiliently'and iioatlngly mounting said member from said housing but conning it therein for movement in all directions relatively to xsa'id vhousing and forming the sole and a floating sup- -port of said member,motor operated meanscarried by said member within the housing and `spaced fully from the walls of said housing for imparting to said member rapid local periodic movements of small amplitude, and a plurality of freely flexible el-ements projecting from said member, exteriorly of said housing, in side by Side relation for contact at their ends with the skin and transmitting thereto impulses received from said motor means, said motor operated means being operable to impart to said rigid member increments of movement in directions approximately parallel to the longitudinal axes of said nexible elements, whereby impulses will be transmitted lengthwise of said elements to the skin.

V8. A skin stimulating device comprising a housing, having a chamber', an open face leading to the chamber, andgrooves in and extending along opposed Walls of the chamber and parallel to said open face but spaced inwardly therefrom, a strip of soft, elastic material in each groove and projecting into said chamber from the opposed chamber walls, and towards the opposite Wall of rthe chamber, each strip having a channel opening into said chamber and extending parallel-to said open face, a relatively rigid member having its edges received in said channels, supported entirely therefrom, extending across said chamber, and spaced around its entire periphery from said housing, electrically operated means attached to the inner face of said member within said chamber and spaced entirely away from the chamber Walls, for imparting to said member, repeated, rapid, periodic, local movements of small extent, an element detachably secured to the outer face of said member, and a plurality of freely, fiexible long, slender members extending from the outer face of said element, in side by side relation for contact at their outer ends with the skin for transmitting thereto impulses received from said electrically operated means.

HOWARD W. MCCREADY.

REFERENCES CITED 'The following references are of record in' the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 838,096 Fenstermacher Dec. 11, 1906 955,339 Lumsden 1- Apr. 19, 1910 2,018,046 Willson Oct. 22, 1935 2,174,452 Torrison Sept. 26, 1939 2,287,501 Thomas June 23, 1942 2,307,554 Wettlaufer Jan. 15, 1943 2,345,438 Tompkins Mar. 28, 1944

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2540792 *Jan 20, 1947Feb 6, 1951Edwin H TompkinsSkin stimulating and massaging device
US2806235 *Jul 9, 1953Sep 17, 1957Carstairs Roy MVibratory hair brush
US7805794Feb 29, 2008Oct 5, 2010Conopco Inc.Vibrating hair brush
US7814601Mar 2, 2007Oct 19, 2010Conopco, Inc.Vibrating hair brush having isolator support system for controlled vibratory movement
US7865994Feb 29, 2008Jan 11, 2011Conopco, Inc.Vibrating hair brush
US7917983 *Feb 29, 2008Apr 5, 2011Conopco, Inc.Vibrating hair brush
US8342187Feb 17, 2009Jan 1, 2013Conopco, Inc.Vibrating device
WO2006112309A2 *Apr 5, 2006Oct 26, 2006Kiitos Co LtdMassage apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/87, 601/136, 15/22.2
International ClassificationA61H23/02, A46B13/00, A46B13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H23/0263, A46B13/02
European ClassificationA61H23/02R2, A46B13/02