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Publication numberUS2467180 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 12, 1949
Filing dateJan 26, 1946
Priority dateJan 26, 1946
Publication numberUS 2467180 A, US 2467180A, US-A-2467180, US2467180 A, US2467180A
InventorsAnderson Curtis A
Original AssigneeAnderson Curtis A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for target practice
US 2467180 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

c. A. ANDERSON 2,467,180

April 12, 1949.

MACHINE FOR TARGET PRACTICE Filed Jan. 26, 1946 5 Sheets-Sheet l I8 65 *2 d 55 60 H4 4-8 v I0 I 5a o EcToR| 43 2 ("war/3AA Ivor/7s o/v I N V ENTO R ATTORNEY April 1949- 'c. A. ANDERSON 2,467,180

MACHINE FOR TARGET PRACTICE Filed Jan. 26, 1946 '3 Sheets-Sheet 2 BY h [rd Mum A T'TORNEY April 12, 1949. c, ANDERSON 2,467,180

MACHINE FOR TARGET PRACTICE Filed Jan. 26, 1946 s Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. 0UHT /SA.A/VDER$0N BY 29A fi- Maw,

A 7'TOR/VEY Patented Apr. 12, 1949 UNITED STATES FATENT OFFICE MACHINE FOR TARGET PRACTICE Curtis A. Anderson, Mamaroneck, N. Y.

Application January 26, 1946, Serial No. 643,611

17 Claims. 1

My invention relates to machines for target practice and has particular reference to machines in which a moving target is provided for an operator to exercise his skill in correctly aiming at the same.

My invention has for its object to provide a machine of the foregoing general character in which a moving target is provided to be viewed by an operator in an observation window, and further means are provided for the operator to place an imitation gun sight in line with the target and to simulate shots at the target.

A further object of my invention is to provide means in the machine for recording the shots and also for recording the hits, i. e. shots made at the exact moments when the target is exactly in line with the gunsight.

I prefer to provide my machine with a movable stick to be manipulated in a manner similar to the manipulation of a control stick on an airplane, conditions being thereby created similar to the conditions in which a pilot of a fighting plane maneuvers his airplane to obtain a sight on the enemy plane.

An allied object of my invention is to provide means to render the machine operative by dropping a coin in a coin slot, and to limit the time of operation of the machine by a predetermined length of time, at the expiration of which the machine will stop until a new coin is deposited.

The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of my invention are more fully explained in the following specification and accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. l is a sectional elevational view of the machine in which a photocell is employed for registering hits;

2 is a front view of the same partly in section taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a top plan view partly in section taken on the line 33 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a detail View of a motor operated mirror;

Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic View of electrical connections and wiring used in my machine;

Fig. 6 is a sectional elevational view of a modified machine without the photocell;

Fig. 7 is a detail view of the manually operable for moving the projector;

8 is a fractional diagrammatic view of the electrical connections for Fig. 6.

My machine in a form shown in Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive comprises a housing I having a front ex: tension 2 of a reduced height. A screen 3 in the shape of a disc 3, made of frosted glass or similar translucent material, preferably of a convex shape, is placed in a window 4 in the front wall 5 of the housing I. A miniature image of a flying object such as an airplane 3 is projected on the screen 3 by a suitable projector 9 of a conven-. tional type through two mirrors II], II as shown in dotted lines [2. The upper mirror H is con-. tinuously moved in all directions, causing the image 8 to be moved all over the screen. The mirror H for this purpose is mounted on a universal ball and socket type bearing as shown in Figs. 1 and 4, consisting of a ball [4 extending from the rear side of the mirror, rotatively supported in a round socket I5. The latter is supported on legs I6 mounted on the rear wall of the housing. The mirror is moved on its bearing in all directions by an electric motor I! with a suitable speed reducer through cams 20, 2|. Cam 2G is connected to the motor by a shaft l9 and engages a roller 22 rotatively supported in a bracket 23 mounted on the rear side of the mirror. The second cam 2| is mounted on a shaft 26 rotatively supported in a bearing 25 in one of the legs l6 and connected by bevel gears 26 with the shaft iii. The second cam 2| engages a roller 27 rotating in a bracket 28 mounted on the under side of the mirror. The cams 20, 2| are provided with a plurality of lobes and depressions for causing the mirror to oscillate in an irregular manner. A spring 30 is provided for urging the mirror toward the rollers.

For bringing the image 3 into the center of the screen where hairlines 3| intersect each other, a manually operated mechanism is provided for moving the mirror E0 in different directions so as to counteract the displacements of the image caused by the operation of the cams 20, 2|. Mirror H3 is also mounted on a ball and socket type bearing, being provided with a ball-shaped projection 32 at the under side rotatively supported in a round socket 33 which is in turn supported on legs 34 mounted on the base 35 of the housing. The ball-shaped projection 32 is provided with a depending rod 36 pivotally connected at 38 to one end of a rod 39 whose other end is pivotally connected at 40 to the lower end of an operating stick 42. The latter is provided with a ball 43 at its intermediate portion rotating in a bearing 44 supported on legs 45 mounted on the base 35. The upper portion of the stick &2 extends through a large hole 46 in the upper wall 41 of the extension 2 and is provided with a suitable handle 48 for its manipulation. By rocking the stick i2 back and forth, the mirror is made to be rotated in a vertical plane. For its rotation in another vertical plane at right angles to the first plane, the lower end portion of the stick is placed in a fork-shaped end portion 50 of a second rod rotatively supported in its intermediate portion on a pivot 52. The other end of the second rod 5| is provided with a similar fork 53 engaging the lower portion of the rod 3-6. Thus, by rocking the stick 42 from side to side, the mirror ill is caused to rotate in a second vertical plane at right angles to the first plane. By suitably moving the stick 42 in all directions, the movements of the upper mirror II can be compensated for maintaining the image 8 exactly in the center of the screen 3.

The machine is provided with a coin actuated switch for starting operation of the motor ii. A second motor operated switch is also provided for limiting the operation of the machine to a predetermined length of time such as one minute,

for instance. A coin slide 55 is provided for this purpose with a coin slot 56. The slide can be manually moved for dropping the coin into a coin box 57. A door 58 is provided with a lock for removing the coins. A switch 59 (Fig. 5) of a conventional or other construction is provided for starting operation of the motor ll. The coin mechanism may be also of a conventional or other construction and is shown only diagrammatically in Fig. 1.

During operation of the machine, the operator can at any moment shoot at the target 8 by depressing a trigger or button 50 on the stick 42. The button closes a circuit, described more fully hereinbelow, for starting operation of the second or timing motor 6! (Fig. 5) and of a buzzer 62 for producing a sound efiect to indicate that the target is being shot at. The second motor 5! operates a needle 63 of an indicator 64 for indicating the number of shots expended. A second indicator G5 is provided with a needle 56 operated by a third motor ill for registering actual hits at the target. Such hits occur only when the image 8 is brought exactly into the center of the screen 3 at the point of intersection of the hairlines 3| and when the trigger 50 is depressed. Motor is then energized by a circuit including a photocell 'il in the center of the screen 3. The photocell is made conductive when the beam of light i2 is directed against it, closing a circuit for a relay 72 which in turn closes the circuit for the motor 10, causing the indicator 65 to register actual hits.

Electrical connections are shown in Fig. 5. Electric current is taken from a source of supply which may be alternating current or direct current and is shown as an alternating current. One terminal 76 of the source is connected by leads T1, T8 with one terminal of the motor 51, the other terminal of the motor I! being connected by leads 79, 80 through the coin operated switch 59 with the other terminal 8| of the source of current. The switch 59 is closed for a short time by the coin, sufiicient for starting the motor rotation, whereby a holding circuit for the motor is closed by a motor operated switch 82. The latter comprises a disc 82 operatively connected to the motor and provided with diametrically opposite projections 84, 85, normally acting on switch arms 86, 87 for separating them from contacts 88, 89. The arms 86, 8t are resilient and tend to engage the arms 38, 89 respectively. The projections 84, 85 leave the arms 86, 81 as soon as the motor starts rotation by temporarily closing the coin switch 59, thereby causing the contact arms 86, 88 to be closed, as well as the contact arms 8?, 89. The arm 83 is connected by leads 99, iii and '39 with one terminal of the motor ii, and the control arm 86 is connected by a 92 with the lead 86. As a result, the motor will continue rotation, being energized by a holding circuit which may be traced as follows: from the supply lead W by the lead '58, motor ii, leads ?9, Elli, contact arms 38, 86 and lead 92 to the other supply lead 88. The motor will continue its rotation until the disc 82 makes one revolution when the projections 84, will again separate the contact arms 88, S6, deenergizing the motor until another coin is deposited in the slot.

The projections 86, 85 also operate a contact arm $35 which is resiliently urged into engagement with a contact arm 96 and is separated therefrom by one of the projections 83, 85 (the arm 95 is shown in Fig. 5 at a distance from the projection 8t, it being understood that the projection a l acts simultaneously on both arms 86 and 95). The arm 96 is connected by a lead 9'! with the lead 9!, and the arm 95 is connected by leads 98, 99 and switch 55 with a contact arm Hill engageable with a resilient contact arm llll connected by a lead N32 to a lead E93 extending to the coin switch 59. The arm ml is held separated from the arm Hill by a projection Md on a cam-shaped disc H85 operatively connected to the motor iii. The motor 6! is started momentarily by closing the coin switch 59, the circuit being closed as follows: from the supply line 8% by the switch 59, lead ma motor 65, and a lead me to the other supply line ll. The motor, however, is immediately stopped as soon as the switch 59 is again opened, leaving, however, the contact arm Ii)! engaging the arm lilll, thereby establishing a new circuit for the motor 6! through the trigger switch 60, as follows: from the supply line 11 by the lead H36, motor 6!, leads I63, 32, contact arms lei, lllii, lead 93, trigger switch Fill, lead 98, closed contact arms 95, 36, leads 9?, 9!, 99, closed contact arms 88, 8t, and lead to the other supply lead 80.

Thus the operator, whenever he succeeds in placing the target 3 in the center of the screen 3, can start shooting by depressing the trigger switch fill thereby energizing the motor for rotation, the successive shots being registered on the dial 541, it being assumed that each division of the dial corresponds to one shot. At the same time the buzzer 62 will operate, creating a sound effect to indicate the shots. The buzzer is connected to the terminals of the secondary MS of a transformer l i I. A signal lamp l I2 may be also connected across the secondary Hi; to indicate that the shooting takes place. The primary H3 of the transformer Hi is connected at one end by a lead l M to the lead I82 and at the other end by a lead H5 to a lead H6 extending to the contact arm 81, which now engages the other contact arm 85 connected by a lead ill to the lead 78. Hence the buzzer can operate only when the main motor I? is operating and when the trigger switch 6t is depressed. The operation of the main motor is indicated by a signal lamp l 18 connected by H9, I20 with the leads 9! and "i8, respectively.

No shots will be recorded on the indicator 65 as hits, however, unless at the time of the shooting the target 8 is placed in the center of the screen 3. The indicating needle or pointer 66 is operated by the motor 10 one terminal of which is connected with the lead 11, and the other terminal of which is connected by a lead I24 with a contact l25'engageab1e by an arma-' ture Him of the relay 12-1. The relay is connected by leads. I21, I28. with an amplifier i229 for the photocell I- I which. is connected with supply leads SI and I3'I'. The armature. is connected by a lead i21I with the lead 98 through the triple trigger switch, fill. Hence; the motor it operates only when the relay I2 is energized and attracts the armature I28, the motor circuit being: as follows: from the supply line 1.? to the one terminal of the motor Ill, through the motor, from the other terminal by the lead IZ-t, contact H25, armature lit, lead I2 I trigger switch 5! lead 98', closed contact arms 95, 96, leads 9t, cl, cc, closed contact arms 88, 86. and lead 92: to the other supply line 8E. Hits are indicated also by a bell I42 connected to the secondary of. a transformer hit", the primary being connected at one end bya lead it' l to. the; lead 12? and at the other end by the lead H6 to the contact arm t l. An arrangement is also provided for causing the motors ti and lit; to continue their rotation when the main motor has stopped and disconnected the circuits for the trigger switch 60 and photocell l- I. The motor 'iIl' is. provided for this purpose with a switch comprising contact arms Ice, Hi, the resilient arm iii being urged into a contact with the arm E38 and separated from the latter by a projection it? on a cam-shaped disc i133 operated by the motor Ill. The arm I is connected by a lead 13's with the lead- I-Z-l, and the. arm is: is connected by a lead I with a contact 638: engaged by the resilient contact arm 86. when the latter is deflected by the protection at of the disc 52. A similar switch is provided at. the motor 6! consisting of contact arins I38, 139 connected with leads m3 and 335, respectively, the resilient arm it?) being engageable by a projection Mt on the disc Hit.

It may be seen that if the disc 82 engages the arms st and 81, breaking the operating circuits and stopping the mainmotor I1, and if the discs lost and, @333 have not yet completed their cycles of rotation so that. the contact arms 538, I39 are closed as Well as the contact arms I38. l3l then the motors 62!, It will be energized by independent circuits which can be traced as follows: from the supply line H to the motor til, then through lead L36, closed contact arms 93G, lei, lead I35, contact I36, arm 88, and lead 92 to the other supply lead 80. Motor it will, therefore, continue its rotation until the contact arms tad, 53-17 are separated by the projection 532 or 532". The bell M2 does not rin however, during this additional rotation since. its circuit is disconnected by the projection 85 which now separates. the arms 8'3, 533. The motor it? may still continue its rotation, however, if the projection bill has not yet reached the contact arms Hi3, Ltd, which will remain there-fore closed. The motor circuit can be traced as follows: from the supply line ll by the lead I06, motor iii, lead. 5G3", closed contact arms I38, I39, lead 835, closed contact its and arm 8-5, and lead 9,2 to the other supply line 80. The motor 6!. will, then complete its rotation until the projection IM or its separates the arms 38, I351.

It may be noted that. each needle or pointer 83 and 6B completes but. one-half revolution for its complete cycle so. that one or the other end of the pointers or needles is alternately used for irdicating units on the scales 6d, 65, the lower half of each. scale being covered and invisible as shown in Fig. 2. The. units: of the scales E 5, tit corre spond to certain time elements but theymay be calibrated to indicate the number of shots on the, scale 84. and successful hits on the scale 65. Lamps H2, MI are so arranged as to render the scales E4, 65' visible only when the pointers 6T1, (i=6: are moving.

A modified machine is. shown in Figs. 6., '1' and 3. The projector and the motor are mounted in a common elongated casing I50 in the upper portion of the; housing i so that the. beam I2; is directed on the screen 3. without the use of any mirrors. The casing IE0 is mounted for rotation in a horizontal plane, being provided with vertical trunnions ici, l5! rotatively supported in a aimbal ring The latter is provided with horizontal trunnions iii i, i551 rotatively supported a yoke I55 mounted on a base I55. The base I56 is rotatively mounted at $52: in, a yoke Hitwhich is mounted at the upper end of a rod I150. The rod is rotatively supported in brackets H33, I64 extending from the rear Wall ofthe housing I., The lower end of the rod IE0. is provided with an arm. H3, the distal: end of the; am being pivoted at t l-ti to the rear end of a rod H5. The front end of the. rod: H5 is forked at 43., engaging the lower portion, of the stick L2" The intermediate portion of the rod I15 is pivoted at on a post: 52.. Thus by moving the stick t2 from side to side, the rod L60 can be rotated on its axis together with the; projector casing I53.

For rotating the base I56 in a. vertical plane, a second rod Md is, provided slidably supported in the brackets 63, 1.54. and spaced from the rod I166). The upper end, of the rod M16 is provided with a ball Ml engaging. the; base. fist. The lower end of the rod M6 isprovided with a. roller IE5 resting on a tapering orwedge-shaped block I56. slidably restingonthe basev 35 of the housing I.. A spring l il urges the base 556 against the ball I41 A spring llc urges the rod. Ito against the block The block lcli can be moved by a bar ill having a central, opening Itil; straddlingth postv 52,. The front end of the bar I Ii is pivoted at 543 to the lower end of the operating stick 32. The rear end of the bar ill is secured to the block ital for moving the same backv and forth when the stick 4.2 is moved forward or rearward, thereby raising or lowering the rod I45. and rotating the base 55 in a vertical plane.

It should be noted that other suitable connecs tions may be employed between the, stick t2 and the rod I50 for causing rotation of the rod and its axial movement.

For oscillating the beam t2 in different directions, the motor in the casing I5II- is operatively connected. to acam I resting on a pair of rollers IBI, l8?! rotativelysupported in brackets I83 on the base I56 A, spring I 84 urges th casing I59 towards the base I56 thereby also urging the cam into engagement with. the rollers. The lobes and recesses on the cam I80 are so arranged that the casing its is caused to oscillate irregularly both in a horizontal and vertical plane. Cur rent for the motor and projectorin the casing I50 is supplied by flexible leads I88; I89, The. casing is also provided with a contact I90 which engages a stationary contactor I9'I when the beam 12 is, directed into the center of the screen. 3. The contact I90 is connected by a flexible lead I82 to the lead I31, and the contactor IBI is connected by a lead I93 to one end of the relaycoil 12, the other end of the coil 12 being connected to the lead 9 I.

The operation, of the machine shown in. Rigs; 6, '7, and 8 is similar to the operation of; the, machine shown. in Fig; 1

7 It will be understood that various features and principles of each of the embodiments of the invention above described or referred to may be utilized or substituted in the other embodiments. While the invention has been described in detail with respect to certain particular preferred examples, it will be understood by those skilled in the art after understanding the invention, that various changes and further modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, and it is intended therefore in the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen therein; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of the screen in different directions; a member including a switch movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in different directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined position .on the screen; and signal means responsive to actuation of said switch to indicate the moments when the image is brought into said predetermined position.

2. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of the screen in different directions; a member including a switch movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in different directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined position on the screen; signal means responsive to actuation of said switch to indicate the moments when the image is brought into said predetermined position; and means to limit the length of time when the motor is operated.

3. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of the screen in different directions; a member including a switch movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in different directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined position on the screen; a coin operated switch for initially energizing the motor; a camshaped member operatively connected to the motor; switch means operated by the cam-shaped member for maintaining the motor energized for a predetermined length of time; and signal means responsive to actuation of said switch to indicate the moments when the image is brought into said predetermined position.

4. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of the screen in different directions; a member including a switch movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in different directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined position on the screen; a coin-operated switch for initially energizing the motor; a camshaped member operatively connected to the motor; switch means operated by the cam-shaped member for maintaining the motor energized for a predetermined length of time; signal means responsive to actuation of said switch to indicate the moments when the image is brought into said predetermined position; and means to render the signal means inoperative after the motor is deenergized.

5. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of the screen in different directions; a member movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in different directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined position on the screen; signal means to indicate the movements when the image is brought into said predetermined position; and a manually operable trigger switch in said member for rendering the signal means operative.

6. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of the screen in different directions; a member movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in different directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined position on the screen; signal means to indicate the moments when the image is brought into said predetermined position; a manually operable trigger switch for rendering the signal means operative; and means to indicate periods when the trigger switch is operated.

'7. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of the screen in different directions; a member movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by anoperator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in diiferent directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined position on the screen; a trigger switch; an indicator calibrated in units of time; a rotary pointer in the indicator; means to cause the pointer to rotate in response to the operation of the trigger switch for indicating the number of units of time when the trigarea-rte ger switch is operated; 'a second indicator 'ca'librated in units of time; a pointer in the second indicator; and means to cause the pointer to advance on the scale in response to the trigger switch being operated and the projected image being centered at a predetermined point on the screen thereby indicating on the second indicator the number of units or time when the image is centered simultaneously with the operation of the trigger switch.

8. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of thescreen in diherent directions; a member movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in di-fierent directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined position on the screen; a trigger switch; an indicator calibrated in units of time; a rotary pointer in the indicator; means to cause the pointer to rotate in response to the operation of the trigger switch for indicating the number of units of time when the trigger switch is operated; a second indicator calibrated in units of time; a pointer in the second indicator; means to cause the pointer to advance on the scale in response to the trigger switch being operated and the projected image being centered at a predetermined point on the screen thereby indicating on the second indicator the number of units of time when the image is *centered simultaneously with the operation of the trigger switch; means to limit the length of time when the motor is operated; and means to render the indicators inoperative after the motor is deenergized.

9. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of the screen in different directions; a member movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in diiierent directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined position on the screen; a trigger switch; a second motor connected in a circuit with the trigger switch; an indicator having a pointer operated by the second motor and having a scale calibrated in shots or number of time units when the trigger switch is operated; a third motor connected in a circuit with the trigger switch; switch means included in the circuit of the third motor and arranged to close the circuit in response to the image being brought into the predetermined position on the screen; and a second indicator having a pointer operated by the third motor and having a scale calibrated in hits or units of time when the trigger switch is operated simultaneously with the switch means.

19. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of the screen in different directions; 'a member movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in different directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined pos'ition on the screen; a trigger switch; a second motor connected in a circuit with the trigger switch; an indicator having a pointer operated by the second motor and having a scale calibrated in shots or number of time units when the trigger switch is operated; a third motor connected in a circuit withthe trigger switch; switch means included in the circuit of the third motor and arranged to close the circuit in response to the image being brought into the predetermined position on the screen; a second indicator having a pointer operated by the third motor and having a scale calibrated in hits or units of time when the trigger switch is operated simultaneously with the switch means; means operated by the first motor for limiting the length of time of the first motors operation; and means to render the second and the third motors inoperative after the first motor 'is'stoppe'd.

1-1. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; 'a motor inthe housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of "the target to be moved away from the center of "the screen in different directions; a member movably supported in front 'of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the-member for causing the projected image to be moved in diiierent directions so to bring the image into a predetermined position on the screen; a trigger switch; a second motor connected in a circuit with the trigger switch; an indicator having a pointer operated by the second motor and having a scale calibrated in "shots "or numb er of time units when the trigger switch is operated a third motor connected in a circuit with the trigger switch; switch means in eluded in the circuit of the third motor and arranged'to close the circuit in response to the image being brought in-to the predetermined positron on the screen; a second indicator having a pointer operated by the third motor hav ing a scale calibrated in hits or units of time when the trigger switch is operated simultaneously with the switch means; means operated by the first motor for limiting the length of time of the first motors operation; means to render the second and the third motors inoperative after the first motor is stopped; and means responsive to said preceding means to cause the second and third motors to bring the respective indicator pointers to zero positions.

12. A target practicing machine comprising a housing; a translucent screen forming a portion of the front wall of the housing; means in the housing to project an image of a target on the screen; a motor in the housing; means operated by the motor for causing the projected image of the target to be moved away from the center of the screen in difierent directions; a member movably supported in front of the housing adapted to be moved by an operator; means operated by the member for causing the projected image to be moved in difizerent directions so as to bring the image into a predetermined position on the screen; a trigger switch; a second motor connected in a circuit with the trigger switch; an indicator having a pointer operated by the second motor and having a scale calibrated in "shots or number of time units when the trigger switch is operated; a third motor connected in a circuit with the trigger switch; switch means included in the circuit of the third motor and arranged to close the circuit in response to the image being brought into the redetermined position on the screen; a second indicator having a pointer operated by the third motor and having a scale calibrated in hits or units of time when the trigger switch is operated simultaneously with the switch means; means operated by the first motor for limiting the length of time of the first motors operation; means to render the second and the third motors inoperative after the first motor is stopped; means responsive to said preceding means to cause the second and third motors to bring the respective indicator pointers to zero positions; and means to render the indicator scales visible when their pointers are being moved by the second and third motors.

13. A target practicing machine as set forth in claim 9 in which the switch means in the circuit of the third motor is controlled by a photoelectric element.

14. A target practicing machine comprising a screen; a projector for projecting an image of a target on the screen; a motor; cam means operated by the motor for moving the projector, whereby the target image is moved in different directions away from a predetermined point on the screen; manually operable means including a trigger switch for independently moving the projector in difierent directions; and signal means responsive to actuation of said switch to indicate the moments when the image is brought by the manual means into the predetermined position on the screen.

15. A target practicing machine comprising a screen; a projector for projecting an image of a target on the screen; a motor; cam means operated by the motor for moving the projector, whereby the target image is moved in different directions away from a predetermined point on the screen; manually operable means including a trigger switch for independently moving the projector in different directions; signal means responsive to actuation of said switch to indicate 12 the moments when the image is brought by the manual means into the predetermined position on the screen; and means to count the number of units of time when the image is brought into the predetermined position.

16. A target practicing machine comprising a screen; a projector for projecting an image of a target on the screen; a motor; cam means operated by the motor for moving the projector, whereby the target image is moved in different directions away from a predetermined point on the screen; manually operable means for independently moving the projector in different directions; signal means to indicate the moments when the image is brought by the manual means into the predetermined position on the screen; means to count the number of units of time when the image is brought into the predetermined position; and manually operable trigger means for rendering the signal means and the counting means operative.

17. A target practicing machine comprising a, screen; a projector for projecting an image of a target on the screen; a motor; cam means operated by the motor for moving the projector, whereby the target image is moved in difierent directions away from a predetermined point on the screen; manually operable means for independently moving the projector in different directions; signal means to indicate the moments when the image is brought by the manual means into the predetermined position on the screen; an indicator having a rotary element for indicating the total number of units of time when the image is brought into the predetermined position; means responsive to the position of the projector when the image is projected on the predetermined point on the screen for causing rotation of the indicator element; and trigger means to render the indicator element rotating means operative.

CURTIS A. ANDERSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,954,509 Yates Apr. 10, 1934 2,335,257 Binks Nov. 30, 1943

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3709502 *Mar 1, 1971Jan 9, 1973Granta CorpMessage device
US3790172 *Oct 27, 1971Feb 5, 1974Nakamura Seisakujo KkSimulated bombing apparatus
US3815913 *Jan 12, 1972Jun 11, 1974Wren CliffordDual image alignment apparatus
US3990704 *Dec 29, 1975Nov 9, 1976Marvin Glass & AssociatesTarget image projector with simulated gun assembly
US3993309 *Mar 4, 1974Nov 23, 1976Marvin Glass & AssociatesGame apparatus utilizing a display screen
US4052066 *Feb 19, 1976Oct 4, 1977Nintendo Co., Ltd.Light-emission gun amusement machine for home use
US4090712 *May 25, 1977May 23, 1978Shields Jr James RAnimated game
US4296931 *Mar 26, 1979Oct 27, 1981Nintendo Co., Ltd.Projecting-type shooting game apparatus
US4345764 *Jan 30, 1980Aug 24, 1982Gordon Barlow DesignHand-held electronic game
US5190286 *Sep 23, 1991Mar 2, 1993Namco, Ltd.Image synthesizing system and shooting game machine using the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/51, 273/358
International ClassificationF41G3/26, F41G3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41G3/2694
European ClassificationF41G3/26C2