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Publication numberUS2468164 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 26, 1949
Filing dateApr 5, 1946
Priority dateApr 5, 1946
Publication numberUS 2468164 A, US 2468164A, US-A-2468164, US2468164 A, US2468164A
InventorsBrewster Gordon L
Original AssigneeBrewster Gordon L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vaporizer device
US 2468164 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 26, 1949.

G. L. BREWSTER VAPORIZER DEVICE Filed April 5, 1946 INVENTOR GORDON L. B REWSTER ATTORNEYS Patented Apr. 26, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE VAPORIZER DEVICE Gordon L. Brewster, Evanston, Ill.

Application April 5, 1946, Serial No. 659,775

2 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in Vaporizers and more especially to a device of that character which is adapted to be used in connection with an electric lamp bulb.

.Heretofore vaporizersor disseminating devices have been of the type which substantially encase an electric light bulb thereby obscuring a material portion of the light. This type of device was further unsatisfactory in that the body portion was usually sufficiently large and heavy so as to prevent ready radiation of the heat emitted by the lamp bulb thereby causing the lamp bulb to overheat.

The heretofore used type of Vaporizers usually brought the material carrying the volatile substance into direct contact with the lamp bulb thereby dissipating the substance in a short period of time and necessitating constant replacement of the volatile substance. It was to overcome these and other obvious objections that the present invention was conceived.

The main objects of this invention are to provide a vaporizer which will slowly radiate fumes from an impregnated liner contained therein; to provide a perforated metallic vaporizer having a filler of paper or other cheap absorbent material which may be impregnated with a volatile substance; to provide a vaporizer of this character which may be readily recharged when worn out; to provide a device of this character which when mounted on an electric bulb will not materially obscure the light emanating from the bulb; to provide a device of this character which will fit snugly about the stem of an electric bulb; to provide a vaporizer which will add to the ornamental appearance of an electric bulb; to provide a vaporizer having an absorbent liner which can readily be impregnated with the fluid desired to be vaporized and which, although substantially entirely exposed to the walls of the light bulb, is not in direct abutting contact therewith; to provide a device of this character whereby the heat radiated from an electric bulb will slowly vaporize the volatile material carried by the liner of the device; to provide a device of this character with which the surrounding air can be saturated with a vapor having medicinal, disinfectant or perfuming, or insecticide qualities; and to provide a, vaporizer which is simple, inexpensive and easy to manufacture.

An illustrative embodiment of this invention is shown in the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of my invention.

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view showing the vaporizer in cross section.

Fig. 3 is a side elevational view showing the lamp bulb in a, suspended position.

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2 but with the light bulb removed.

Fig. 5 is a top plan view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1, but with the light bulb removed.

Referring in detail to the drawings, the outwardly flaring housing or carrier I is open at both ends, is preferably constructed of a rigid, light, workable, non-inflammable metallic material and generally conforming to the contour of the neck of an electric light bulb. The housing i is provided with an annular flange or spacer base 2, integrally secured to the lower marginal edge (as viewed in Fig. 2) of the housing I, the free end thereof being bent upwardly to act'as a circular bearing surface and define the lower opening The upper end of the housing I is also provided with an annular flange or spacer integrally secured to the inner wall below the top marginal edge of thehousing and having its free end 5 bent inwardly and downwardly to define the large or upper opening 9 and act as the upper bearing surface. Perforations 6 are dispersed throughout the housing I and may be in a geometric or ornamental design.

An annular tube-like liner or saturator I comprising an outwardly flared body, preferably constructed of asbestos, cement or any other suitable non-inflammable compound, moulded, cast or shaped to conform to the shape of the neck or stem of a lamp bulb and having both ends thereof open, is designed to be encased within the housing and secured in position by the flanges 2 and 4 and their bent ends 3 and 5.

The liner I is impregnated with a volatile or vaporizable substance, in liquid form, at any time either before or after it is positioned within the housing by submerging it for a time in the liquid of the substance desired to be vaporized. After the liner has become fully saturated, it is removed from the fluid, the excess moisture being removed by drying or by wiping off.

The impregnated liner is encased in the housing and the housin is slid over the stem portion of a lamp bulb and the light bulb screwed into the light socket. It will be noted, especially from Fig. 2, that the bent ends or bearings 3 and 5 of the flanges 2 and 4 respectively bear directly on the lamp bulb wall and prevent the liner from coming into direct contact with the lamp bulb and at the same time prevent the vapor from the liner I from escaping along the side of the lamp stem.

It will be apparent from Figs. 1 to 3 that the device may be used in conjunction with a lamp bulb which is either in a suspended or upright position. When used on a lamp which is used in an upright position, the flange 2 bears directly against the marginal edges of the open end of the lamp socket. It will also be apparent that the device encloses only the stem portion of the bulb and does not, therefore, materially obscure any of th light emanating from the bulb.

When the saturated Vaporizer is positioned on the lamp bulb stem and the bulb is turned on, the heat generated by the bulb will slowly volatize the substance contained in the liner and will slowly radiate and force the fumes out of the housin l through the perforations d from Where they will be diffused through the surrounding air by convection.

The stem of the lamp bulb being relatively cooler than the remainder of the bulb, the fumes from the liner, positioned thereabout, will be dissipated at a much slower rate than they would be if the liner were in contact with a hotter portion of the bulb. The relatively slow dissipation of the fumes insures an even and constant distribution of the fumes over a relatively long period. of time,

It is to be understood from the foregoing scription that the liner may be recharged from time to time by dipping the entire device into the desired fluid or may be replaced by a new liner.

It is to be understood that numerous details of the invention herein shown and described may be altered or omitted without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by the following claims:

I claim:

1. A vaporizer of the class described adapted to be supported by and surround the neck of an electric light bulb comprising a non-flexible housing shaped to enerally conform to the contour of the neck portion of an incandescent bulb, the upper and lower ends of said housing being opened, and the outer wall being perforated, in-

wardly projecting imperforate annular flanges integrally secured to the inner wall of said housing and adjacent the upper and lower ends of said housing, the free ends of said spacer flanges being bent inwardly to form bearing members, and non inflammable absorbent material impregnated with a vaporizable substance secured in said housing by said spacer flanges to space said material away from the walls of the incandescent lamp whereby a portion of the heat radiated from the bulb will act upon said absorbent material for disseminating the vaporizable substance.

2. The device according to claim 1 wherein the non-inflammable absorbent material is a relatively non-flexible liner preformed and of a shape generally conforming to the shape of said housing and the neck of the incandescent bulb, and wherein the inner face edges of said annular flanges snugly seat against the neck of the bulb whereby to prevent air from entering the device between the inner face edges of said flanges and the wall of the incandescent bulb.

GORDON L. BREWSTER.

CITED UNFED STATES PATENTS 1,983, 51? Adams Jan. 22, 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1920599 *Sep 13, 1932Aug 1, 1933 Vaporizer
US1966738 *Apr 10, 1931Jul 17, 1934 Perfume vaporizer
US1988617 *May 4, 1931Jan 22, 1935 Volatile deodorant heater
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2532800 *Dec 17, 1947Dec 5, 1950Peter J AdinamisLight fixture
US2741812 *Feb 15, 1954Apr 17, 1956Tellier AndrePerfume dispenser
US2741813 *Nov 24, 1953Apr 17, 1956Rubin SidneyEvaporation disseminator
US4009384 *Mar 10, 1975Feb 22, 1977The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc.Lamp scent unit
US4074111 *Jan 27, 1977Feb 14, 1978Hunter William GeorgeVaporizing attachment for light bulbs
US4647428 *Mar 28, 1986Mar 3, 1987Gyulay Joseph MAir freshener method
US4849181 *Nov 27, 1985Jul 18, 1989Lad TechnologyHeat activated dispenser for vaporizable materials
US4965490 *Jan 9, 1989Oct 23, 1990Gte Products CorporationScent-generating lamp using mating parts
US6035098 *Jul 20, 1999Mar 7, 2000Osram Sylvania Inc.Scent lamp
US6090349 *Jan 12, 1998Jul 18, 2000Hirano; MutsuoDiffuser
US7246919Mar 3, 2005Jul 24, 2007S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.LED light bulb with active ingredient emission
US7318659Jun 23, 2006Jan 15, 2008S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Combination white light and colored LED light device with active ingredient emission
US7476002Oct 12, 2006Jan 13, 2009S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Color changing light devices with active ingredient and sound emission for mood enhancement
US7484860Oct 26, 2006Feb 3, 2009S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Combination white light and colored LED light device with active ingredient emission
US7503675Jan 8, 2007Mar 17, 2009S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Combination light device with insect control ingredient emission
US7520635Oct 12, 2006Apr 21, 2009S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Structures for color changing light devices
US7581851 *Jan 3, 2005Sep 1, 2009Jessica WangScented lighting devices and systems, and methods for making the same
US7604378Oct 12, 2006Oct 20, 2009S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Color changing outdoor lights with active ingredient and sound emission
US7618151Mar 27, 2008Nov 17, 2009S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Combination compact flourescent light with active ingredient emission
US8281514 *Jun 12, 2009Oct 9, 2012Tom FlemingOrganic insect extermination lamp
US8579453Jan 24, 2012Nov 12, 2013Steven Martin CohenDecorative lighting assemblies utilizing scent releasing cartridges and related methods
US20050195600 *Mar 3, 2005Sep 8, 2005S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Led light bulb with active ingredient emission
US20060147353 *Jan 3, 2005Jul 6, 2006Jessica WangScented lighting devices and systems, and methods for making the same
US20070014549 *Jun 23, 2006Jan 18, 2007Demarest Scott WCombination White Light and Colored LED Light Device with Active Ingredient Emission
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US20080066372 *Sep 18, 2006Mar 20, 2008Tom FlemingOrganic insect extermination lamp
US20080232091 *Mar 27, 2008Sep 25, 2008S.C. Johnson & Son, IncCombination Compact Flourescent Light with Active Ingredient Emission
US20090293341 *Jun 12, 2009Dec 3, 2009Tom FlemingOrganic Insect Extermination Lamp
WO1987003207A1 *Nov 25, 1986Jun 4, 1987Lad Technology, Inc.Heat activated dispenser for vaporizable materials and method of manufacture
WO2005086245A2 *Mar 3, 2005Sep 15, 2005S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Led light bulb with active ingredient emission
WO2005086245A3 *Mar 3, 2005Feb 9, 2006Johnson & Son Inc S CLed light bulb with active ingredient emission
Classifications
U.S. Classification392/393, 392/395, 422/125, 219/552, 422/305
International ClassificationF21V33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V33/00
European ClassificationF21V33/00