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Publication numberUS2469064 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 3, 1949
Filing dateFeb 7, 1945
Priority dateFeb 7, 1945
Publication numberUS 2469064 A, US 2469064A, US-A-2469064, US2469064 A, US2469064A
InventorsCampbell Edmund M
Original AssigneeMine Safety Appliances Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adhesive compress
US 2469064 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 3, 194 a E. M. CAMPBELL ADHES IVE COMPRES S Filed Feb. '7, 1945 IN VENTOR.

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fld- WWW Patented May 3, 1949 ADHESIVE COMPRESS Edmund M. Campbell, Pittsburgh, Pa., assignor to Mine Safety Appliances Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application February 7, 1945, Serial No. 576,604

3 Claims.

This invention relates to adhesive compresses.

The adhesive compresses with which this invention is concerned are those in which a dressing pad is carried by the central portion of the adhesive side of a short strip of adhesive tape so that the pad can be applied to a wound and held in place by sticking the projecting ends of the tape to the skin. Until such a compress is used, the sterility of the dressing pad is preserved by a pair of overlapping sterilized fabric strips which overlap the pad. Strips extend away from the pad in opposite directions and are stuck to the tape on both sides of the pad. When it is desired to use the compress the protective strips are removed from the tape to expose its adhesive end portions and the pad. However, in many cases one of the protective strips, which generally are made of crinoline, adheres to the dressing pad as well as to the tape. In lifting the adhering strip from the pad the fingers often touch the pad and thereby destroy its sterility.

The principal object of this invention is to provide an adhesive compress in which the protective strips will not adhere to the dressing pad.

The preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view of my adhesive compress, and Fig. 2 is a side view showing the compress bent backwardly to cause th inner ends of the protective strips to swing away from the dressing pad.

Referring to Fig. 1 of the drawings, a sterile dressing pad I of gauze or the like is applied to the adhesive surface of a short length of adhesive tape 2 of any desired width. The pad, which may be medicated or impregnated with an antiseptic, is disposed about midway between the ends of the tape. Adhering to the tape on opposite sides of the pad is the usual pair of protective fabric strips 3 and 4, the inner ends of which overlap above the pad sufliciently to cover it and protect its sterility. The material that has been found most suitable for these strips is crinoline, although other materials may be used.

It is a feature of this invention that the inner strip of crinoline is prevented from adhering to the dressing pad, as it otherwise may do when the elements of the compress are pressed together during manufacture. Accordingly, a sterile separating member 5 is placed between the inner strip 3 and the pad to space them apart. This separator is made of a material non-adherent to th pad so that when the compress is bent, as shown in Fig. 2, the separator and both strips will be moved away from the pad. Of the materials suitable for use as a separator, glazed paper, especially waxed or glassine paper, has been found to be especially suitable. Although the separater may be disposed loosely in the compress so that it will fall out when the compress is opened, it is preferred that one edge of the separator be stuck to the tape close to one side of the pad.' Preferably, the separator is stuck to the tape at the end that carries the inner protective strip 3.

With an adhesive compress made in accordance with this invention there is no danger of either protective strip adhering to the dressing pad. Consequently, it is unnecessary to use the fingers close to the pad where they might touch it and destroy its sterility.

According to the provisions of the patent statutes, I have explained the principle and construction of my invention and have illustrated and described what I now consider to represent its best embodiment. However, I desire to have it understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically illustrated and described.

I claim:

1. An adhesive compress comprising an adhesive tape, a dressing pad adhering to th central portion of the adhesive side of the tape, two overlapping strips of protective fabric overlying said pad and adhering to the tape on opposite sides of the pad, and a separator non-adherent to the pad disposed between the pad and inner protective strip to keep the latter from sticking to the pad.

2. An adhesive compress comprising an adhesive tape, a dressing pad adhering to the central portion of the adhesive side of the tape, two overlapping strips of protective fabric overlying said pad and adhering to the tap on opposite sides of the pad, and a separator non-adherent to the pad disposed between the pad and inner protective strip to keep the latter from sticking to the pad, one edge of said separator being stuck to the tape at one side of the pad.

3. An adhesive compress comprising a substantially straight adhesive tape, a sterile dressing pad adhering to the central portion of the adhesive side of the tape, two overlapping strips of sterile crinoline overlying said pad and adhering to the tape on opposite sides of the pad, and a sterile separator non-adherent to the pad disposed between the pad and inner crinoline strip to keep the latter from sticking to the pad, one

edge of said separator being stuck to the tape UNITED STATES PATENTS clos to the pad and. between said inner strip Number Name Date and the tape- 1,671,825 Johnson May 29, 1928 EDMUND M. CAMPBELL 5 2,133,609 Enstis Oct. 13, 1933 2,145,755 DlCkSOIl Jan. 31, 1939 REFERENCES CITED FOREIGN PATENTS The following references are of record in the Number country D file of $1115 P 595,875 France Oct. 10, 1925 France Nov. 22, 1933

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1671825 *Oct 6, 1925May 29, 1928Johnson & JohnsonPackaging surgical cotton
US2133609 *Jul 20, 1934Oct 18, 1938Kendall & CoSurgical dressing
US2145755 *Sep 13, 1937Jan 31, 1939Johnson & JohnsonSurgical dressing
FR595875A * Title not available
FR755273A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2553270 *Apr 2, 1949May 15, 1951Ecusta Paper CorpBandage
US2572641 *Mar 10, 1947Oct 23, 1951Charles ManleyWound dressing
US2714382 *Jul 21, 1952Aug 2, 1955Solis Alcala MaximinoEmergency bandages
US4176664 *Mar 13, 1978Dec 4, 1979Stanley KalishImpregnated bandage
US4457754 *Jan 29, 1982Jul 3, 1984E-Med CorporationMulti-purpose securement strip for use on the body of a patient
US4928680 *Sep 9, 1988May 29, 1990Smith & Nephew PlcAdhesive coated dressing and applicators therefor
US5733251 *Aug 20, 1996Mar 31, 1998Medical Device Designs, Inc.Pop top dressing applicator
US5843011 *Aug 11, 1997Dec 1, 1998Lucas; GregorySelf adhesive bandage roll
US6362388Nov 30, 1999Mar 26, 2002Gregory J. LucasAdhesive bandage
WO1999007316A1 *Aug 6, 1998Feb 18, 1999Gregory LucasSelf adhesive bandage roll
WO2007048171A1 *Oct 17, 2006May 3, 2007Tracey Lee EdwardsA medicated dressing for wound healing
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/57
International ClassificationA61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/0203
European ClassificationA61F13/02B