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Publication numberUS2469589 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 10, 1949
Filing dateSep 20, 1948
Priority dateSep 20, 1948
Publication numberUS 2469589 A, US 2469589A, US-A-2469589, US2469589 A, US2469589A
InventorsJack Barricini
Original AssigneeToy Pop Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Confection with support therefor
US 2469589 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 10, 1949.

J. BARRICINI CONFEGTION wrru SUPPORT THEREFOR Filed $ept. 20, 1948 INVENTOR. JACK BARR/C/Nl.

ATTORNEK Paten ted May 10, 1949 CONFECTION wrrn SUPPORT. .rr r'mnnroa Jack Barricinl, Searsdale, N, Y., assignor, by

mesne assignments,- to The ToyPop Corporation, New York,'N. 1 a corporation of Delaware Application September 20,1948, Serial 1%." 5 0',1 s o Y 1 This application is a continuation in part of my prior application, Ser. 768,564, filed'August 14, 1947, now abandoned.

This invention relates generally to improvements in confections and more particularly to sticks or supports for confections such as candy,

ice-cream, ices, chocolate, cake, et cetera, to i facilitate the confection being sucked or eaten,

while the stick or support is held by the hand of the eater.

It is a prime object of the present invention to provide as a new article of manufacture, a confection comprising an eatable member and a stick or support for the eatable member; the stick or support being a non-toxic synthetic elastomeric body having an enlarged end portion, preferably in the form of an ornamental figure, anchored or imbedded' in the eatable member; and having the opposite end portion projecting therefrom and forming a handle, the elastomeric material being characterized by freedom from chemical migration and from combining with the eatable member.

A still further object of the present invention is to employ as the stick or support for the confection a synthetic elastomeric material which is further characterized by being tasteless, odorless, moisture resistant, tough yet resilient, sterilizable, non-soluble in mouth acids and which may be easily washed clean after the confection has been consumed.

Another object of the present invention is to provide flexible non-inflammable stick serving not onlylas a support for the eatable member, but also as a handle and to make the stick ornamental and aesthetic looking, enabling the stick to serve other functions such as a toy for children.

Yet another object of the present invention is to make a confection support or stick of suitable elastomeric or flexible material and to provide this material with a coating or layer of non-toxic synthetic elastomeric material possessing the aforementioned qualities or characteristics.

A still further object of the present invention is to produce a pliable or flexible stick for supporting an eatable member; the stick bein made wholly of polyethylene or being provided with a coating or layer of polyethylene.

Heretofore, sticks used to support eatable members such as, for example, lollypops, icecream, ices, or the like, were substantially uniformly flat or cylindrical and were chiefly made out of wood or cardboard, presenting a hazard particularly to children. The stick being subinto the eatable member.

stantially uniform in shape and thickness frequently permitted the confection to turn or slide thereon and to entirely leave the stick while being eaten or sucked on.

Where a wooden stick was employed, it was apt to break or peel, or splinter, subjecting the child to injury; and where a cardboard or fibreboard stickwas used, it was apt to become soft or mushy, to lose'lts stability and tear, and parts of the stick adhering to the confection could be taken accidentally into the mouth together with the confection.

The present invention presents a distinct advance in the art because it eliminates the dangers heretofore encounterd in commercial products of this nature which usually have used wooden sticks and been subject to known objections. Many, attempts have been made heretofore to correct these objections, but the very number of those emphasizes the need for such correction and yet the conventional products still are made almost entirely of wooden sticks. Apparently these numerous suggestions have not been satisfactory. As representative of these suggestions may be mentioned besides wood and cardboard heretofore mentioned, such products as rubber, crude rubber compositions, twisted paper, cord, cellophane and other cellulosic sheet materials. These products have many objections, particularly in affecting the taste of the eatable member and in migration of the chemicals Paper, rubber and even cellophane, deteriorate and become brittle in storage, fragments of which might be broken off in or with the candy and be consumed by children with deleterious efiect. These materials are inflammable and, therefore, from a desirable standpoint are not efficiently suited for the purpose intended, particularly when the confection is being consumed by children.

Cellophane may contain chemicals which may be injurious through migration. Such migration is accelerated through elevated temperatures. Cellophane becomes embrittled at low temperatures and would break in the candy. Besides it contracts at low temperatures. Crude rubber compositions usually contain plasticizers which may migrate and act similarly to cellophane under various conditions of temperature. Rubber will crack, become brittle and deteriorate with age. Consequently when dealing with an article of the nature herein contemplated, where the same is not consumed within a relatively short time, these factors are highly important. Wooden sticks commonly used in lollypops today are usually stiff and rigid and are likely to splinter, thus being a cause of injury, particu larly, to children who suck on them. Where the stick is made of twisted paper or rope, as the product is consumed the mouth moisture softens the material of the stick so that the candy is released from the stick and becomes a hazard. Furthermore, portions of the foreign material may be consumed with the candy.

It is, therefore, another important object of the present invention to provide a relatively economical and practical stick or support for a confection which overcomes the heretofore menticned disadvantages and satisfies the abovementioned objects.

I have discovered that the objections to such known materials could be overcome by forming the stick of non-inflammable, non-toxic synthetic elastomeric material in which no chemicals migrate from the remaining body, such as, for example, polyethylene. Polyethylene retains its toughness and flexibility without the assistance of a plasticizer and is heat stable. 7

Furthermore, the stick formed of the material contemplated herein has the desired flexibility, is non-toxic, tasteless and odorless, will not break down and combine with candy, may be molded or fabricated inexpensively, is age-resistant so as not to change even after a period of years and has sufficient strength to hold the candy-and what is of importance is the non-inflammability of the material. The material selected is tough, moisture resistant, sterilizable and non-soluble in water and mouth acids. Among the safety features of polyethylene as adapted to this invention, may be mentioned, firstly, flexibility to avoid injury to a child should the stick be forced into the mouth or other parts of the body, accidentally; secondly, because of the toughness of polyethylene the candy may be anchored to the stick preventing the user from choking on the complete mass of candy by otherwise leaving the stick or by the stick breaking off.

The above and other objects and advantages will be more readily understood and amplified by reference to the following description and accompanying drawing depicting, by way of example only, certain forms of the invention and in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a confection according to the invention;

Fig. 2 is an edge view thereof;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of a confection according to the invention in a slightly modified form;

Fig. 4 is a section through 4 4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is an edge view of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is an edge view (partly in section) showing the invention in another modified form; and

Fig. 7 is a section through 1-1 of Fig. 6.

Referring now more particularly to the drawing, there is disclosed a solid mass of candy i0, supported by stick or support member II. The candy ID is shown, by way of example, as being transparent or translucent through which the figure 0r ornamental part l2 (at its upper end) is visible. It is quite evident that the stick or member ll may be employed to support any desired confection or edible, such as candy including chocolate, ice-cream, ices, cake, or the like. It is further quite evident that the stick or support Il may assume any desired shape and be formedwith any desired embellishment, ornament or figure.

The stick or support H or H! to which the confection H) or H is anchored, is made of non-toxic non-inflammable synthetic elastomeric material III characterized by freedom from chemical migration and from combining with the eatable member and having heretofore mentioned characteristics and qualities. As stated heretofore, polyethylene is an example of such material.

Polymers of ethylene known as polyethylene or polyethylene resins are essentially straight-chain polymers of ethylene that is, straight-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons of varying molecular weights. They are chemically inert and closely related to parafiin, and consequently these resins.

exhibit many of the properties of ordinary paraffin wax. The polyethylene resins preferably adapted for carrying out the purpose of the invention are paraflin-like compounds of high molecular weight and the mechanical difference between ordinary paraffin wax and these polyethylene resins is due to the high molecular weight of polyethylene. Filled polyethylene compounds also may be employed as the support or stick for the confection, these materials containing an inert filler or fillers which impart a degree of rigidity to the material.

The stick member may be made in a variety of colors, can be washed clean and sterilized so that it can be used for other purposes after it has served for supporting the confection. The upper part or head of the support H or 14 may assume the shape of an animal, alphabet, bird, train, airplane, or any other desirable object or configuration. Fig. 1 shows the upper part of stick H in the shape of a horse l2 and Fig. 3 shows the up per part of stick M in the shape of a bear [8.

The shank of the stick forms a flexible handle and may be of any desired shape or configuration, such as, for example, flat oval in cross section, rounded at the free end l3 and tapering towards the figure 12 (Fig. 1) or flat with beaded outline l5 and raised ridged portion [6, on both sides of the stick to give body and reinforcement ,tion, such as, for example, polyethylene.

to the stick as well as produce an additional anchor for the candy I! (Fig. 3).

Figs. 1 and 7 illustrate a confection comprising candy I9 supported by and anchored to stick 20 embodying the invention in a modified form. Stick 20 having the figured top portion 23 may comprise a body 22 made of any suitable and desirable elastomeric or flexible material which may not in itself have any or all of the desired qualities and characteristics and to which has been applied, in any suitable manner, a coating or layer 22 of non-toxic synthetic elastomeric material characterized by freedom from combining with the eatable member, and from chemical migra- This coating or layer will impart to the stick the desired qualities and characteristics heretofore mentioned.

The stick 20 in itself may comprise a body of suitable elastomeric or flexible material compounded, formulated or combined with the material of which coating or layer 22 is comprised of.

From the foregoing, it is evident that by this invention there has been provided a confection embodying a stick having novel features and which accomplishes and incorporates all of the objects and advantages heretofore set forth.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. As a new article of manufacture, a confection comprising an eatable member and a support therefor, said support comprising a body of polyethylene and having an ornamental figure at one end portion thereof formed of polyethylene integral with the body of the support and imbed- (led and secured in the eatable member.

2. As a new article of manufacture, a confection comprising an eatable member and a flexible support therefor, said support having an ornamental figure at one end partion thereof formed integral with the body of the support and an-. chored in said eatable member, and having the opposite end portion projecting therefrom and forming a. flexible handle, said support having at least the surface part of its anchored portion which is in contact with said member comprising polyethylene.

3. As a new article of manufacture, a confection comprising an eatable member and a support therefor, said support comprising a body of polyethylene and having an anchoring device at one end thereof formed of polyethylene integral with the body of the support and imbedded and secured in the eatable member.

4. As a new article of manufacture, a confection comprising an eatable member and a flexible support therefor, said support having an enlarged head at one end portion thereof formed integral with the body of the support and anchored in said eatable member, and having the opposite end portion projecting therefrom and forming a flexible handle, said support having at least the surface part of its anchored portion which is in contact with said member comprising polyethylene.

5. As a new article of manufacture, a confection comprising an eatable member and a flexible support therefor, said support having an anchoring portion embedded and secured in said member and aflexible portion integral therewith and projecting therefrom forming a handle, said support having at least the surface of its anchoring portion comprising polyethylene.

6. As a new article of manufacture, a confection comprising an eatable member and a flexible support therefor, said support having an anchoring portion embedded and secured in said member and a handle portion integral with said anchoring portion and projecting therefrom, said support having at least the surface of its anchoring portion comprising polyethylene.

'7. As a new article of manufacture, a confection comprising an eatable member and a flexible support therefor, said support having an anchoring portion formed of polyethylene embedded and secured in said member and a handle portion formed of polyethylene integral with said anchoring portion and projecting therefrom.

1 JACK BARRICINI.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES P TENTS Name C Date Ellestad Oct. 19, 1937 OTHER REFERENCES Number

Patent Citations
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US2096611 *Feb 7, 1935Oct 19, 1937Parker Meyer Dennis CompanyConfection
Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification426/104, 446/268, 428/16, 446/72, 446/386, 426/134
International ClassificationA23G9/32, A23G3/00, A23G3/56, A23G9/50, A23G9/44, A23G3/34
Cooperative ClassificationA23G3/563, A23G9/503
European ClassificationA23G9/50D, A23G3/56D