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Publication numberUS2470665 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 17, 1949
Filing dateJul 8, 1947
Priority dateJul 8, 1947
Publication numberUS 2470665 A, US 2470665A, US-A-2470665, US2470665 A, US2470665A
InventorsStiehl Charles William
Original AssigneeStiehl Charles William
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction apparatus
US 2470665 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 17, 1949. c. w. STIEHL 2,470,665

SUCTION APPARATUS Filed July 8, 1947 FIG.II

33 CHARLES w; STIEHL,

Patented May 17, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 7 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in suction apparatus, and more particularly to improved su'ction tube apparatus for use in decompressing a distended stomach or intestine, for withdrawing contents of the stomach or intestine in gastric analysis procedure, and for similar purposes to which suction tube apparatus is applicable. By reversal, the herein apparatus may also be employed in introducing fluids to the stomach or intestine for treating purposes.

In the treatment of patients who are obstruct ed or who, after operation, are unable to pass secretions or contents through the stomach and/or intestine, it is necessary to draw of? the gastrointestinal secretions or contents until such organs are again able to take over the function of passing them through. Various forms of suction tube apparatus designed for this treatment are known, but, generally speaking, they are open to the objection that they are likely to become plugged by the gastro-intestinal walls being sucked into the inlet or suction opening or openings of the tube under the suction efiect of the apparatus. It is accordingly an object of the present invention to provide an improved suction tube apparatus incorporating means for positively preventing the gastro-intestinal walls from being drawn into all of the suction openings of the suction tube by the suction created in the stomach or intestinal cavities, thereby rendering the action of the suction tube apparatus more certain and positive, as compared to prior devices of similar function.

Another disadvantage to the use of a known type suction tube apparatus is that it employs two different tubes, one for decompressin-g the stomach and the other for decompressing the intestine. It is a further object of the invention to provide a suction tube apparatus eliminating the requirement of separate gastro and intestinal decompression tubes and which, on the other hand, provides unitary apparatus serving the dual purpose of decompressin-g either the stomach or intestine, as desired. In this connection, it is noted that the suction openings of a suction tube passed into the intestine are likely to become plugged by the intestinal walls being sucked into the suction openings of the tube, to the same degree as the gastric walls lining the stomach tend to plug such suction openings.

Hence, it becomes obvious that suction tube apparatus optionally capable of decompressing either stomach or intestine and incorporating means for preventing the plugging of all of its suction openings by either the gastric lining of the stomach or the intestinal walls gives better overall results as compared with those obtained with known suction tube apparatus.

More specifically, the invention contemplates andv aims to provide an improved gastro-intestinal suction tube apparatus characterized by the inclusion of means functioning as a hood or shield disposed about the suction openings of the tube and which is capable of maintaining the gastro-intcstinal walls spaced from said openings, whereby to facilitate withdrawal of secretions or contents of the stomach and intestine without'the danger of the wall or walls thereof plugging said opening under the efiect of suction.

More detailed objects of the invention are to provide improved suction tube apparatus which may be relatively inexpensively manufactured, which may be easily swallowed and thereupon passed into the stomach or intestinal openings to be decompressed, and which is characterized by thoroughly dependable operation.

Other objects and features of advantage of the improved suction tube apparatus of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description thereof taken with the accompanying drawings illustrating its salient features, in which- Fig. 1 is a more or less diagrammatic View of suction tube apparatus according to the invention as the same is employed in treating a patient;

Fig. 2 is a section taken through the inlet or suction-opening end of the apparatus illustrated in Fig. 1;.

Fig. 3 is a section taken along the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Figs. 4 and 5 are detail part-sectional views taken through the walls or sacs forming a protective hood disposed about the aforesaid suction or inlet openings of the suction tube, Fig. 4 generally illustrating the relationship of said walls prior to inflation, and Fig. 5 illustrating the relation of said walls upon inflation; and

Figs. 6 and 7 are views corresponding to Figs. 4 and 5 illustrating a modified construction of protective hood.

Referring to the drawings, wherein like reference characters designate like parts throughout the several views, suction tube apparatus according to the invention employs a dual passage tubul ar member i0 preferably of full circular section and consisting of a large-diameter tube H and a smaller-diameter tube 12 enclosed within the periphery of the larger tube H, as seen in Fig. 3. The large-diameter tube H functions as a suction tube providing a suction passage from the stomach or intestine, and the smaller-diameter tube l2 as a positive pressure tube whose function will be hereinafter more specifically described.

The tubular member ii] is connected at its relatively outer end into a branch fitting l4, through which a length of supplementary tubing i5 ex tending to a collecting vessel i6 is connected to the suction tube ii. The interior of the vessel It is in turn connected by a tube ii to a source of controlled partial vacuum such as a Wangenstein suction apparatus (not shown). A suitable source of positive pressure illustratively shown as a syringe i8 is connected through tubing l9 and fitting M to the smaller pressure tube i2 of the main tubular member iii.

At its inner or stomach end, the suction tube ii is shown to be closed by a rounded head Ila (Fig. 2) provided with a plurality of openings lib, i ic through which suction is applied to the stomach or intestine. As is well understood, the head end of the dual passage tube i0 is swallowed and worked downwardly into the cavity of the stomach, or into the intestine as shown in dotted lines (Fig. 1), depending on which organ is to be decompressed. To assist in proper placement of the tube, the dual passage tube ii] is molded from relatively hard rubber or equivalent material, so that it can readily be forced into the stomach or intestine by proper manipulation applied to the outer end thereof. Upon the suction means being placed in operation, a condition of vacuum is created in the suction tube ii, and thereby in the stomach or intestine through suction openings lib, iic,

When vacuum is created in the gastro-intestinal cavities, as aforesaid, it ofttimes happens that the gastro-intestinal lining or wall is sucked into the suction openings lib, lie, with the result that said openings become plugged. To overcome this difiiculty, the invention provides means for hooding or shielding the suction end of the tube in such manner that its suction openings are at all times maintained spaced from the gastro-intestinal walls, said means at the same time permitting suction applied through the suction tube to effect the-drawing off of the secretions and contents desired to be removed from the stomach or intestine, as well as the venting of gases accumulating therein. For this purpose, I provide about the head or suction end of the tube ii a protective hood generally designated 22, which illustratively comprises inner and outer balloon-like sacs 23, 2%, respectively, of thin, tissue-like rubber or equivalent material. As seen in Fig. 2, the open ends of the sacs are sealed to one another and to the outer surface of the main tubular member it as by vulcanizing. The sacs 23, M are connected at a multiplicity of points throughout their surfaces by tubules 22.5 which are sealed at their ends to the edges of corresponding openings provided in the sacs, whereby the tubules provide a multiplicity of through passages extending from exterior to interior of the so assembled sacs. Moreover, and as best seen in Figs. 4 and 5, the described assembly of sacs with sealed connecting tubules 26 provides in airand liquid-tight space between sacs to which a suitable pressure medium such as air, water or mercury may be admitted to effect distension or inflation thereof. When so inflated, the sacs form a protective hood or shield disposed about the suction openings lib, lie of the suction tube ii, the tubules 26 providing open- 4 ings through which gases, secretions and/or contents of the stomach or intestine may pass to the interior of the hood and thence to the tube ii through the suction openings lib, lic.

To admit an inflating pressure medium to the space between the outer and inner sacs, the assembled sacs are connected to the tubular member ii] in such manner that the outlet end of the pressure tube i2 thereof communicates with the space provided between the sacs. Accordingly, the outlet end of the pressure tube i2 is preferably angled as at 28 to extend through an opening in the inner sac 23, whereby the pressure tube directly communicates with the space between sacs. Upon a pressure medium being supplied to the pressure tube It as by syringe l8, such pressure passes to the space between sacs and causes inflation or distension thereof, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2, and as indicated in Fig. 5. When inflated as aforesaid, the sacs 23, 2-3 function as a protective hood which maintains the gastro-intestinal lining or walls spaced from suction openings lib, lie, and thus eliminates the possibility of their being sucked into and plugging these openings. Even if the stomach or intestinal walls close on some of the tubule openings, for example those on a side of the hood engaging said walls, the tubule passages on the other side of the hood remain open so that the vacuum in the tube ii is eifective through the unplugged openings, with the suction openings i lb, lie of the main suction passageway being at all times maintained open.

In the use of the suction tube apparatus described, the suction end of the tube is placed in the patients mouth with the protective hood defiated, in which condition it may readily be swallowed by the patient. Due to the relative stiffness of the dual passage tube ill, the inlet end thereof may be readily forced into the stomach or intestine, as desired (Fig. l) pushing the collapsed hood before it. Upon the inlet end and its protective hood being properly positioned, the hood is inflated to the desired degree by supplying a pressure medium to the space between the inner and outer sacs forming the hood, and thereupon suction is applied in the usual manner through the suction passage ii of the main tube.

It will be understood that means other than tubules 26 for providing suction passages between the exterior and interior of the hood may be employed. For example, and referring to Figs. 6 and '7, the sacs 33, 34 may be spot-connected together at a multiplicity of spaced points 35 throughout their surface areas as by vulcanizing, openings 35 being thereupon punched through the sacs at such points of connection. Said openings 36 provide a multiplicity of passages extending from exterior to interior of the assembled sacs, and the manner of connecting the sacs together results in the formation of a sealed, air-tight space between sacs.

Without further analysis, it will be appreciated that suction tube apparatus as described achieves the desirable objective of preventing the suction openings of the suction tube from being plugged by the gastro-intestinal lining or walls, under the influence of suction created through the tube in the stomach and intestine. Hence, a more certain and positive functioning of the apparatus of the invention is assured, as compared with prior suction tube apparatus. The described suction tube apparatus is also of advantage in combining in a single piece of apparatus means for decompressing the intestine as well as the stomach,

since the suction tube apparatus as herein proposed may be used with equal facility in treating distension of both the intestine and the stomach.

Inasmuch as the protective hood is normally collapsed and as the sacs forming the same are made of soft, tissue-like rubber or equivalent material, the mounting thereof as proposed at the suction end of the tube introduces no difficulty in swallowing, so that the improved apparatus may be employed in treating distended stomach or intestine conditions, in the same manner as prior suction tube apparatus.

It will be appreciated that the described suction tube apparatus may be used also in withdrawing the contents of the stomach or intestine for the purpose of obtaining a gastric analysis. It is also possible to use the herein apparatus as a means for introducing treating fluids to the stomach or intestine, as by detaching the suction apparatus and running the treating fluid under pressure (or gravity) into tube H and out through the multiple openings of the sacs into the stomach or intestine. All such uses and applications of the described apparatus are of course intended to be embraced within the scope of the present invention.

As many changes could be made in carrying out the above construction without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. In gastro-intestinal suction tube apparatus, a tubular suction member having a suction opening in an end thereof, a perforated protective hood carried by the tubular member adjacent said end for maintaining the suction opening spaced from the gastro-intestinal walls, said hood comprising inner and outer sacs of soft, tissue-like rubber connected in such manner as to provide a plurality of openings extending from exterior to interior thereof and a sealed space between the sacs, and means for supplying pressure medium to the space between the sacs whereby to inflate the same to the form of a protective hood disposed about said suction openings.

2. Gastro-intestinal suction tube apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sacs are connected by tubules sealed at their ends to the outer and inner sacs, respectively.

3. Gastro-intestinal suction tube apparatus as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sacs are spotconnected to one another at a plurality of points throughout their surfaces, and the openings are punched through said sacs at their points of connection.

4. In gastro-intestinal suction tube apparatus, a dual passage tube, the passages thereof being connected at their one end to sources of vacuum and positive pressure, respectively, the other end of the vacuum passage having a suction opening, an inflatable protective hood carried by said tube adjacent its other end adapted upon infiation to maintain the suction opening spaced from the gastro-intestinal lining or walls, said hood being provided with a plurality of through openings extending from exterior to interior thereof, and means for inflating said protective hood by pressure admitted thereto through the pres sure passage.

5. In gastro-intestinal suction tube apparatus, a dual passage tube, the passages thereof being connected at their one end to sources of vacuum and positive pressure, respectively, the other end of the vacuum passage having a suction opening, a perforated protective hood carried by said tube adjacent said other end, said hood comprising inner and outer sacs of soft, tissue-like rubber whose walls are connected to each other in such manner as to provide a plurality of openings from exterior to interior thereof and a sealed space be-- tween said sacs, said pressure passage communicating with the space between said sacs to supply pressure to said space, the arrangement being such that said sacs are inflated by pressure admitted to the space therebetween to form a perforated hood maintaining the suction opening spaced from the gastro-intestinal lining or walls.

6. Gastro-intestinal suction tube apparatus as set forth in claim 5, wherein the sacs are connected by tubules sealed at their ends to the outer and inner sacs, respectively.

'7. Gastro-intestinal suction tube apparatus as set forth in claim 5, wherein the sacs are spotconnected to one another at a plurality of points throughout their surfaces, and the openings are punched through said sacs at their points of connection.

CHARLES WILLIAM STIEHL.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 985,865 Turner, Jr Mar. 7, 1911 1,209,846 Kells Dec. 26, 1916 1,444,714 Teschima Feb. 6, 1923 2,230,218 Asche Feb. 4, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 2,450 Great Britain 1886

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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/103.1, 600/581, 604/268
International ClassificationA61M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M1/0084, A61M2210/0625, A61M2210/1053
European ClassificationA61M1/00T2