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Publication numberUS2471236 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 24, 1949
Filing dateDec 7, 1945
Priority dateDec 7, 1945
Publication numberUS 2471236 A, US 2471236A, US-A-2471236, US2471236 A, US2471236A
InventorsParker Allen J
Original AssigneeParker Allen J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning device for fuses and fuse holders
US 2471236 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1949- v A. J. PARKER 2,471,236

CLEANING DEVICE FOR FUSES AND FUSE HOLDERS Filed Dec 7,' 1945 IN V EN TOR.

421m J. Par/667;

Patented May 24, 1949 CLEANING DEVICE FOR FUSES AND FUSE HOLDERS Allen J. Parker, West Palm Beach, Fla. Application December 7, 1945, Serial No. 633,574

.3 Claims.

This invention relates to an improvement in cleaning devices and has particular reference to a device for removing and cleaning electric fuses and fuse holders.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a device for quickly and conveniently removing a fuse from its terminal holder in a manner that will avoid breakage ofthe fuse or injury of the fuse holder.

A further object of the invention resides in means associated with the device for quickly and efficiently cleaning the terminals of the fuse holder and then the opposite ends of thefuse.

Another object of the invention resides in the extreme simplicity of the device, is strong, durable and highly eflicient in use.

Other important objects and advantages of the invention will present themselves during the course of the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the device with a fuse and fuse holder to be cleaned,

Figure 2 is a face view of the device,

Figure 3 is an end view thereof,

Figure 4 is a face view of the device, shown in the position for removal of the fuse,

Figure 5 is an inverted face view illustrating the method of cleaning the fuse ends,

Figure 6 is a. face view, partly in section of a slightly modified form of the invention, and

Figure 7 is a vertical section taken on line 7-7 of Figure 6.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to like parts throughout, the numeral 5 designates a fiat, preferably metal shank portion, provided at one end with a tubular head 6. Positioned in the tubular head 6 and extending therebeyond an equal distance on either side, is a cylindrical cleaning element 1, preferably formed of metal and having its circumferential surfaces serrated or roughened for providing an abrasive surface to clean the fuse terminals 8 of a fuse block 9. The opposite end of the shank 5 terminates in a hooked extension I 0 having its inner and concave surface provided with a suitable abrasive II of any desired form. The abrasive I i may be omitted and the inner surface of the hook roughened by serrating. The hook portion In is formed slightly wider than the shank 5, for a purpose to be presently explained. The terminals 8 are normally adapted to support a conventional fuse, having a glass body portion l2 and metallic ferrules l3, the ferrules l3 seating in the terminals 8 as is customary.

In the use of the device, it being assumed that 2 1 the terminals 8 and ferrules l3 have become corroded and interrupt the flow of electrical current therethrough, the hook in is engaged beneath the body l2 of the fuse, as shown in Figure ,4 and pulled upward, lifting the fuse from the terminals. The width of the hooked end In is substantially that of the glass body l2 and the lifting action exerts an even pressure throughout the length of the glass, thereby avoiding an uneven pressure with its frequent fracturing of the glass. This even Withdrawing pressure assures the removal of the fuse without damage. After the fuse has been removed, the device is inverted and the cleaning element I forced into the fuse terminals. Rocking of the device back and forth completely cleans all foreign deposits from the contact surfaces of the terminals. After the terminals have been cleaned, the device is'removed and inverted, as in Figure 5 and the ends of the fuse are alternately inserted against the abrasive II and rotated thereagainst by hand until all foreign matter has been removed. 7

The structure as illustrated in Figures 6 and 7 is identical in shape and size to that first described and comprises a shank 5, head 6 and oppositely extending cylindrical cleaners l. The body 5 terminates at its opposite end in the hook ID, as before. In this form of the invention, the shank 5, head 6, cleaners 1 and hook I 0 are formed as an integral structure, preferably of a molded substance, such as plastic and the cleaners 1 have their surfaces coated in any convenient manner with an abrasive substance, such as Carborundum. Since most of the conventional plastics are of a dielectric nature, such an article aids in preventing accidental shock when used around fuse blocks. The inner surface of the hook I0 is likewise coated with an abrasive. The use of this form of the invention is identical with that first described. In the first form of the invention, the cleaner 1 is engaged in the head 6 in a manner to hold it against turning and disengagement, either by a force fit or by the use of a suitable set screw, not shown.

It will be seen from the foregoing that an extremely simple and effective device has been provided for efiiciently cleaning the fuse ends and fuse terminals of corrosive deposits. The device lends itself to any conventional fuse block and the method of removing the fuse is especially convenient, since in many cases the fuse blocks are placed in more or less difficult spots that make it difficult to remove the fuse without injury to both the fuse and the fuse holder. The device may obviously be made in varying sizes to suit the particular type of fuse to be cleaned,

may be grasped and pulled upon after hook In has been engaged about the fuse to be removed,

as in Fig. 4. The hook 101m turn serves as a v finger grasp when the ends I are to be oscillated in the corroded terminals. dimensioned and provided internally with an abrading surface, to cause it to function as shown in Fig. 5.

It is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the precise form shown, but that it includes within its purview, whatever changes fairly come Within'eit'her'the terms or the scope of the appended claims.

Having described the invention, claimed is 1. A device for removing cartridge type fuses from their fuseblock terminals-and for cleaning said terminals; consisting of rigid member of general F-shape comprisinga shank 'anda-transverse-head which lie substantially'at right angles to 'each other the opposite ends of the head being of'cylind'rical form and projecting-substantiallyequidistantly beyond theshank and being roughenedto constitute abrasive-elements dimenwhat lS sioned to abrasively'engage within the terminals I of a; fuse block; the terminal end' of the shank being curved forwardly to form a hook-like meme ber extending across thefree end or said shank, 'saidhook-like member constituting a finger grasp by which the cylindrical roughened ends of the head may be rocked back and forth within, the terminals to, cleanthe same, said'hook-like member beingdimensioned to engage about, the body ofa cartridge fuse to pull the same out of its fuse block terminals when the device is.inverted andtheheadis grasped as a handle andpull'ed outwardly and away from said fuse block.

'21 A device for removing cartridge typefuses from their fuse block terminals and for cleaning'saidterminals, consisting of arigid member. of general'T-shape comprising a shank anda transverse head whichiie substantially at rightangles to each other the opposite endsof theheadbeing of cylindrical form, and projecting substantially equidistantly beyond the shank and, being Further this hook. is,

roughened to constitute abrasive elements dimensioned to abrasively engage within the terminals of a fuse block, the terminal end of the shank being curved forwardly to form a hook-like member extending across the free end of said shank, said hook-like member constituting a finger grasp by which the cylindrical roughened ends of the head may be rocked back and forth within the. terminals to clean the same, said hook-like member being dimensioned to engage about the body of a cartridge fuse to pull the same out of its fuse block terminals when the device is inverted and the head is grasped as a handle and pulled outwardly and away from said fuse block, the concave face of said hook-like member being roughened to provide an abrasive surface and" dimensioned to receive the ends of fusesto, be cleaned.

3. A device for removing cartridge type fuses from their fuse block terminals and for cleanin said terminals, consisting of a rigid member of general F -shape comprising a shank and a transverse head which lie substantially at right angles to each other the opposite ends of the head being of cylindrical form and projecting substantially equidistantly beyond the shank and beingroughened toconstitute abrasive elements dimensioned to-abrasively engage within the terminals of a fuse block, the terminal end of the shank beingcurved forwardly to form a hooklike'member extending across the free end of said shank, said hook-likemember constituting a finger'grasp by which the cylindrical roughened ends of the head may be 1 rocked; back and.v forth within the terminals to clean the same, said hook-like member being dimensioned to engage about the body of a cartridge fuse to pull the same out of its fuse block terminals when the device is inverted andthe head is grasped as a handle andpulled" outwardly and'away from said fuse block, the width of said 'hook-like-member being greater. than the: width of the shank at the junction of the latter with the transverse head.

ALLEN- J; PARKER,

REFERENEES. GIT-ED The following references are of record in the of this; patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,200,089- Dooley Oct. 3; 1916 1952,96 1 Stafiord Jan. 8, 1918 1 ,759,739 Ferris May 20, 193.0

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1200089 *Dec 10, 1915Oct 3, 1916Arthur T DooleySharpening implement.
US1252964 *Feb 3, 1917Jan 8, 1918Clarence B StaffordCleaner for fuse-contacts.
US1759739 *Dec 3, 1928May 20, 1930Fannie FerrisBird-cage-perch cleaner
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2734320 *Jul 26, 1954Feb 14, 1956 Fuse socket cleaning tool
US2834162 *Jun 21, 1956May 13, 1958Emil Adel JohanTool for sharpening peelers
US2922218 *Mar 27, 1957Jan 26, 1960Arthur LewisPipe cleaning device
US3504459 *May 18, 1967Apr 7, 1970Truck Lite CoTerminal cleaning device
US5148572 *Dec 20, 1989Sep 22, 1992Wells James MVideo game console and cartridge cleaning kit
US5201093 *Jul 6, 1992Apr 13, 1993Wells James MVideo game console and cartridge cleaning kit
US9333617 *Aug 29, 2013May 10, 2016Eaton CorporationDecontamination device and method for removing contaminants from electrical apparatus
US20150065016 *Aug 29, 2013Mar 5, 2015Eaton CorporationDecontamination device and method for removing contaminants from electrical apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification451/558, 7/158, 451/461, 15/236.8, 407/29.15
International ClassificationB24B23/08
Cooperative ClassificationB24B23/08
European ClassificationB24B23/08