Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2472265 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 7, 1949
Filing dateMar 19, 1946
Priority dateMar 19, 1946
Publication numberUS 2472265 A, US 2472265A, US-A-2472265, US2472265 A, US2472265A
InventorsHarry Phillips
Original AssigneeHarry Phillips
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of securing together moccasin vamps and plugs
US 2472265 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 7, 1949, H. PHILLIPS METHOD OF SECURING TOGETHER MOCCASIN VAMPS AND PLUGS v 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 19, 1946 INVENTOR ATTORNEYS June 1949- H. PHILLIPS METHOD OF SECURING TOGETHER I MOCCASIN VAMPS AND PLUGS I Filed March 19, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTQR HAPPY fl/LL/PS BYW LT ATTORNEYS Patented June 7, 1949 FFlCE Harry Phillips,.New. York, N. Y. Application lviarch 19, 1946, Serial No. 655,423

1 Claim. 1'.

I his invention relatesv to an improvement in the method of manufacturing the so-called moccasin type of' shoe, that is,v a shoe of the true moccasin type.

Such shoes have been previously made by a method which includes hand stitching the vamp to the upper while on a last. In the use of this new method the costly hand stitching onthe last is eliminated and the resultant shoe retains the characteristic of the true moccasin type of shoe having the raised seam around the fore part where the outer edges of the plug and the front section of the upper are joined together.

Broadly stated, the invention includes the steps of temporarily stitching, by hand or otherwise, the front portion of the upper to the upturned edges of the plug and then machine stitching these same edges together below the line of the hand stitching. Both of these operations are performed without the use of a last. After these operations, the stitched edges are cut or severed so as to remove the parts which are held together by the temporary stitching. This leaves the shoe with the raised seam effect having the regular machine stitches. .The shoe is then finished in the usual manner.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and such other objects as may hereinafter appear the invention consists in the method and process hereinafter described, it being understood, however, that various changes ma be made in practice within the scope of the appended claim without digressing from my inventive idea.

In the drawings,

Figure 1 represents a perspective view of a finished moccasin type shoe made in accordance with my invention.

Figure 2 represents a vertical section taken on line 2-2 of Figure 1, before the shoe is finished and showing both the temporary stitching and the permanent stitching connecting the edges of the vamp to the edges of the upper and before the parts which are joined by the temporary stitching are severed or cut.

Figure 3 is a vertical section taken on line 3-3 of Figure 1 looking in direction of the arrows.

Figure 4 is a vertical section taken on line dl of Figure 1 looking in direction of the arrows.

Figure 5 is a rear elevation of the finished moccasin type shoe.

Figure 6 is a top plan view of the bottom of the heel portion thereof before the lift is fitted.

Figure 7 represents views of the series of blanks from which the shoe upper and heel portions are made and include the following: A is the large blank which is made of suitable leather or other material and forms the bottom, sides and upper of the shoe, B isthe blank which is used to form theplug of the completed shoe, C and D are two parts which constitute the back stay, E represents a blank which in the finished shoe is stitched over the upper andthe rear part of the plug, F represents a blank which is stitched around. the top edge of the. rear portion of the upper.

It is not believed to be necessary to describe the details of the shape of the larger blank A, which, when assembled, forms the bottom and sides of the upper of the completed shoe. However, it is important to note that the edge of the front portion is perforated with a series of holes I, these holes being uniformly spaced. The smaller blank B, which, as stated, later forms the plug of the complete shoe, has a portion 2 which corresponds in configuration to the forward portion of the blank A. This portion 2 of blank B is also perforated, as at 3, around its edge, these perforations being spaced equi-distantly. It is to be noted, however, that these perforations are spaced apart a less distance than the distance between the perforations I of blank .A,

The first step of the process includes the stitching of the edges of the blanks A and B together with the plug blank edge upturned in contact with the bottom blank sides, the stitches ll (Figure 2) extending through the complementary perforations l and 3 and preferably being made by hand. This operation roughly forms the fore part of the moccasin, as it temporarily secures the plug and the fore part of the upper together.

After this operation the assembly is permanently stitched, preferably by machine, on a line 5 below the line of the temporary stitching above referred to. After this permanent line of stitching is completed, or during the stitching thereof, the top edges of the joined plug and upper, including the temporary stitching, are severed or cut substantially along the line 5-5 of Figure 2, so that the fore part of the shoe has the appearance illustrated in Figure 1.

After this operation has been performed, the back stay, composed of the blanks C and D, is placed in position, the blank E is sewed across the rear end of the plug and the corresponding part of the upper, and the blank F is sewed or otherwise secured to the rear portion of the upper edge of the upper.

The shoe is then placed is then cemented in place. to the upper as shown in on a last and the sole Then the sole is sewed Figures 3 and 4, and

afterwards thelift or heel G is secured thereto, in accordance with standard practice.

Most of these operations are more or less standard. The important part of my improvement involves a temporary stitching of the edges of the vamp to the upper edges of the upper and then permanent stitching of these edges together on a line below the line of the temporary stitching and then the severing of the material between the two lines of stitching.

These operations are performed without the use of a last.

The result is a completed shoe of the moccasin type having a uniform machine stitching of the edges of the vamp to the upper edges of the upper. The shoe is the same in construction and appearance as a shoe made in accordance with standard practice but the method above described gives much greater economy in production and actually produces a shoe of better construction and appearance.

What I claim is:

The method of manufacturing a shoe of the true or genuine moccasin type, which includes the provision of a leather blank for the bottom and sides of the completed shoe, said blank being perforated around the edges of its fore part, providing a plug which is perforated around the edges of its fore part, such perforations being spaced apart a less distance than the spacing of the perforations around the edges of said first mentioned blank, assemblin the blank and plug together with the plug edge upturned in contact with the bottom blank sides by stitching through the alined and complementary perforations so as to connect the edge of the plug to the edge of the fore part of the bottom blank, then permanently stitching said blank and plug together along a line below the line of said first mentioned stitchin and severing them along the line between said two rows of stitching.

HARRY PHILLIPS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,052,133 Curtin Feb. 4, 1913 1,128,902 Rawlings Feb. 16, 1915 1,841,328 Gogin Jan. 12, 1932 2,108,415 Simister Feb. 15, 1938 2,302,580 Shields Nov. 17, 1942 2,329,819 Braun Sept. 21, 1943 2,381,356 Lee Aug. '7, 1945 2,421,521 Lee Dec. 10, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1052133 *Mar 18, 1908Feb 4, 1913Shields BrothersMoccasin.
US1128902 *May 19, 1913Feb 16, 1915Eugene J RawlingsMoccasin.
US1841328 *Feb 17, 1931Jan 12, 1932G H Bass & CoFootwear
US2108415 *Mar 14, 1936Feb 15, 1938Simister Louis WMoccasin
US2302580 *Nov 7, 1940Nov 17, 1942Shields Francis JMoccasin
US2329819 *Jul 21, 1941Sep 21, 1943Walter BraunMoccasin type shoe
US2381356 *Feb 22, 1944Aug 7, 1945Jacob SandlerShoemaking
US2421521 *Jul 26, 1945Jun 3, 1947Rca CorpInterlacing system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2564301 *Mar 25, 1950Aug 14, 1951Fed Shoe IncFully slip-lasted and machine sewn moccasin
US2694870 *Dec 7, 1951Nov 23, 1954Jack MeltzerMoccasin type article of footwear
US2774087 *Nov 12, 1953Dec 18, 1956Jo An Shoe Mfg Co IncMethod for securing together moccasin vamps and plugs
US2946069 *Dec 17, 1956Jul 26, 1960Jo An Shoe Mfg Co IncMethod of manufacturing moccasins
US3471948 *Oct 27, 1966Oct 14, 1969Nadler Martin SMoccasin footwear
US4481725 *Feb 22, 1982Nov 13, 1984Clarks Of England, Inc.Moccasin
DE1056967B *Oct 21, 1955May 6, 1959Calzaturificio Verbano E BiancSchuh, dessen Schaft sich teilweise mokassinartig ueber die Laufflaeche erstreckt
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/142.0MC, 36/11
International ClassificationA43B3/14, A43B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/14
European ClassificationA43B3/14