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Publication numberUS2472754 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 7, 1949
Filing dateOct 20, 1945
Priority dateOct 20, 1945
Publication numberUS 2472754 A, US 2472754A, US-A-2472754, US2472754 A, US2472754A
InventorsWarren J Mead
Original AssigneeWarren J Mead
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for making and maintaining an impression of the shape of an object
US 2472754 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- z .June 7,'1949. A 'WINE/ID 2,472,754 METHOD FOR MAKING AND'MAINTAINING AN IMPRESSION OF THE SHAPE OF O CTS Y Filed 0ct. 20, 5

Patented June 7, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT DCF-.KOI

OFFICE METHOD FOR MAKING AND MAINTAIN- ING AN IMPRESSION OF THE SHAPE OF AN OBJECT 4 claims. 1

This invention relates to a method for making and maintaining an impression of the shape of an object, and although it is not limited in its application to making the impression of any particular object, it is well adapted and particularly intended for use in making an impression of the shape of a human foot. For the purpose of illustration, and not of limitation, the invention will therefore be described as applied to that use.

In the making of a shoe to t an individual human foot, which may sometimes be an abnormally or peculiarly shaped foot, difficulty is experienced in fashioning a special shoe last on which a shoe can be built that will satisfactorily conform to the shape and dimensions of the foot.

In carrying out the invention, use is made of the broad principle set forth in my application Serial No.`555,010, filed Se tember 20 1944. The present invent1on makes it possible easTTto obtain a ilrm and faithful impression of the shape of a foot (or other object) in a closed or partially closed cavity of such shape that the object making the impression could not be Withdrawn from an ordinary mold.

In the accompanying drawings which illustrate the invention as applied to making an impression of a human foot,

Fig. 1 is a cross-section of the device;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section of the device;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the device;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the deformable unit used in the bottom of the device;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of one of the other deformable units and Fig. 6 is a fragmentary vertical section similar to Fig. 2 but showing the step of preparing a molded replica of the foot illustrated in Fig. 2.

The casing I is a box-like structure which may be of any size and shape appropriate to the size and shape of the object to be copied. It is shown in the drawings as an oblong structure having bottom, side and end walls and an open top through which the foot and the deformable units may be inserted and removed.

Laid in the bottom of the casing l and substantially filling the lower part of the casing is a deformable impression receiving unit 2, consisting of a sack 3' of sheet rubber or other thin, tough, flexible and extensible material filled with a mass l of granular material, such as sand, mixed with fluid, such as air or water, in such quantity that the mixture as a whole is suillciently mobile to receive an impression of the object, in this case a foot, when pressed into the unit.

The foot 5, shown in rear view in Fig. 1 and in side view in Fig. 2, is then placed upon the top of the sack 3 and pressed into the deformable unit 2 under such weight as is desired, preferably under the full weight which the foot normally carries in order to obtain an impression of the shape of the foot under load as in use, which differs from the shape of a passive foot.

Additional deformable impression receiving units 6, Fig. 5, are provided ofsuch size and shape as to be adaptable to the object, in this example a human foot, and to the casing. Otherwise, each such additional unit has the same characteristics as the above described unit 2 in that it comprises a sack or container 1 filled with a mobile mixture 8 of granular material and fluid.

After the foot has been pressed into the deformable bottom unit 2 and properly seated to form the impression, additional deformable units are closely packed about the foot so that the assembled units will envelop and conform to the shape of the foot and form within the assemblage a partially closed cavity (open only at 9, Fig. 3, about the ankle) shaped like the foot. Two such additional units are shown in the drawings, one placed at each side and overlapping the top of the foot. It will be understood that the assemblage may consist of as many such units as are necessary or desirable to envelop the particular object or part of the object of which the impression is to be made.

Each deformable unit is provided with a nipple I0 communicating with the interior of the container sack and sealed thereto in any ordinary manner. The inner terminal of the nipple is preferably screened as indicated at Il, Fig. 2, to prevent the escape of granular material while permitting the passage of fluid. Each nipple is also provided with a cock or hand valve I2 to open or close the passage through the nipple.

When the assembled deformable units have been properly packed about the object so that the desired impression of the object has been formed within the assemblage, the fluid pressure within each unit is reduced by exhausting fluid from the mixed mass of granular material and fluid to an extent suillcient to solidify the granular mass by virtue of the principles more fully explained in my said application Serial No. 555,010. Any suitable form of exhaust pumping device may be used for reducing the fluid pressure, that shown in the drawing being a conventional air pump, indicated at P, connected-,to one of the nipples by a. flexible tube. The pump may ril"- desirably be a pressure-vacuum pump which may be used not only to exhaust fluid for solidifying the granular mass, but also to force fluid into the sack in such quantity as may be desirable to loosen the grains and render the mixture sufficiently mobile to receive the impression of the object.

After each unit has been solidified and the partial vacuum in each has been sealed by its valve I2, the entire assemblage forms in effect a solid mold of built-up interiltting units having an interior cavity conforming to the shape of the object.

In order to remove the foot, as many of the solidified units are removed as may be necessary to permit the foot to be withdrawn, after which the units are replaced in their original positions so as to restore the complete impression left by the foot. To facilitate such removal in .the example illustrated by the drawings, one or both side walls of the casing I may be hinged as indicated at I3. By swinging the hinged side downwardly and away from the assembly, one of the upper units, now solidified, may be easily removed, and the foot may be withdrawn sdewise without disturbing the other units, after which the removed unit may be replaced and the hinged side of the casing closed and locked to hold the assemblage against disarrangement. An outline of the cavity left in the assembled unit by the foot is indicated in plan view in Fig. 3 at I4.

A casting may now be made of the mold cavity within the assemblage by means of a suitable plastic material and used as a pattern for fabricating a shoe last appropriate to the individual foot which formed the impression; or a pattern of the interior cavity may be made by inserting a sack ll of flexible, extensible and impervious sheet material into the cavity, inflating the sack to make it conform to the shape of the cavity, lling the sack with a mixed mass of granular material and fluid and solidifying the granular mass by exhausting the fluid through a nipple I', all as more fully explained in my said application Serial No. 555,010 and illustrated in Fig. 6 thereof. Obviously, if a pattern is desired somewhat larger than the foot but following its contour, this could be obtained by making the impression from a foot wearing a sock to enlarge the dimensions of the impression to an extent depending on the thickness of the material of the sock.

A single deformable unit such as 2 disposed in a shallow casing will serve a useful purpose in assisting a retail shoe salesman to flt a shoe to a customers foot. An impression of the outline of the foot may be made by the customer and solidifled in the manner already described, and then by taking measurements of the impression and observing its shape and style, the salesman will be in a position to recommend the size and style of shoe most appropriate for the particular customer.

The invention is adaptable to a great variety of other objects as well as a foot and may be practiced and embodied in many forms and the scope of the invention is not to be limited excepting as defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. The method of making and maintaining an impression of the shape of an object by means of a plurality of deformable, impression receiving units, each unit comprising a container wall of flexible, extensible and impervious sheet material lled with a deformable mass of mixed granular material and fluid, which method comprises packing a number of said deformable units about the object so that the assembled units will envelop and conform to that surface of the object which is to be duplicated, solidifying the granular mass in each unit by reducing the pressure of the fluid therein, and removing the object from the solidified units.

2. The method of making and maintaining an impression of the shape of an object by means of a plurality of deformable, impression receiving units, each unit comprising a container wall of flexible, extensible and impervious sheet material filled with a deformable mass of mixed granular material and fluid, which method comprises packing a number of said deformable units about the object so that the assembled units will envelop and conform to that surface of the object which is to be duplicated, solidifying the granular mass in each unit by reducing the pressure of the fluid therein, removing certain of the solidifled units from the assembly to facilitate removal of the object, removing the object, and then replacing the removed unit or units to restore the complete impression left by the object.

3. The method of making and maintaining an impression of the shape of an object by means of a plurality of deformable, impression receiving units, each unit comprising a container wall of flexible, extensible and impervious sheet mate-` rial filled with a deformable mass of mixed granular material and fluid, which method comprises packing a number of said deformable units about the object so that the assembled units will envelop and conform to that surface of the object which is to be duplicated, solidifying the granular mass in each unit by reducing the pressure of the fluid therein, removing the object from the 1 solidified units, lling the cavity with material capable of conforming to the contour of the cavity, solidifying said material and removing it from the solidied units.

4. The method of making and maintaining an impression of the shape of an object by means of a plurality of deformable, impression receiving units, each unit comprising a container wall of flexible, extensible and impervious sheet material lled with a deformable mass of mixed granular material and fluid, which method comprises packing a number of said deformable units about the object so that the assembled units will envelop and conform to that surface of the object which is to be duplicated, solidifying the granular mass in each unit by reducing the pressure of the fluid therein, removing the object from the solidified units, inserting a sack of flexible,

. extensible and impervious sheet material into the cavity left by the object, inflating the sack to cause it to conform with the surface of the cavity, filling the sack with granular material whose interstitial spaces are fllled with fluid, and solidifying the granular mass within the sack by reducing the pressure of the fluid.

WARREN J. MEAD.

REFERENCES CITED 'I'he following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,675,517 Scholl July 3, 1928 2,145,941 Maxfield Feb. 7, 1939 2,256,036 Redmond Sept. 16, 1941 2,277,288 Berch Mar. 24, 1942

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Referenced by
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US2581489 *Apr 9, 1948Jan 8, 1952United Shoe Machinery CorpApparatus for making casts
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Classifications
U.S. Classification264/517, 264/DIG.500, 206/524.8, 33/515, 264/DIG.300, 53/474, 264/DIG.780, 264/223, 264/313, 264/220
International ClassificationA43B7/28, B29C33/38
Cooperative ClassificationB29C2033/3871, B29C33/3878, B29C33/3821, A43B7/28, Y10S264/78, Y10S264/50, B29L2031/7532, Y10S264/30
European ClassificationB29C33/38M2C, A43B7/28, B29C33/38D