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Publication numberUS2473461 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1949
Filing dateMay 19, 1945
Priority dateMay 19, 1945
Publication numberUS 2473461 A, US 2473461A, US-A-2473461, US2473461 A, US2473461A
InventorsWhite Frank O
Original AssigneeWhite Frank O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydraulic barking machine
US 2473461 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 14, 1949. F. 0. Wm; 2,473,461

HYDRAULI C BARK ING MACHINE Filed May 19, 1945 5 Sheets-Sheet l \NVENTOR F.O.WHITE ATTORNEYS June 14, 1949. 0. WHITE mnmumc BARKING MACHINE :5 Shets-Sheet 2 Filed May 19, 1945 'IIIIIIIIIIA 'IIII FIG.4

\ JvENToR F-O-WH\TE June 14, 1949. wHlTE 2,473,461

HYDRAULIC BARKING MACHINE Filed May 19, 1945 w 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 10 I9 24' BEa/ as [1 o l2 l3 l6 ?6 l L 39 3o 14 38 404 FIG- 3 I" III] III INVENTOR F.O.WHITE' F1135 ma" 6% ATTORNEY 5 Patented June 14, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Canad Application May 19, 1945, Serial No. 594,752

9 Claims. (Cl. 144-208) This invention relates to log barking machines in which jets of fluid are directed against the log to remove the bark and it comprises a machine in which establishment and maintenance of optimum conditions for efficient use of the Jets throughout the debarking operation is provided for by appropriate adjustment of the machine to suit the size and shape of the log being debarked.

In its preferred embodiment the invention comprises a log barking machine in which optimum conditions for efficient operation are established and maintained by automatic relative positioning of the nozzles and a log so that, regardless of variations in the size and shape of the log. the nozzles are pointed radially toward the axis of the log and are spaced from the surface of the log a predetermined optimum distance.

A salient feature of this preferred embodiment is the provision of log-controlled mechanism for effecting the aforesaid automatic relative positioning of the nozzles and the log.

Other characteristic features and advantages of the invention will be more readily understood from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment shown in the accompanying drawings, in which- Fig. 1 is a plan view of a hydraulic log barking machine embodying my invention.

Fig. 2 is a view partly in elevation and partly in section, the plane of the section being substantially along the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 33 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 44 of Fig. 1. This view shows a valve-controlled cylinder and piston device forming part of a nozzle centering means provided for effecting horizontal centering movements of the nozzles shown in the preceding figures.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view of a valve-controlled cylinder and piston device forming part of a second nozzle centering means for effecting vertlcal centering movements of the nozzles shown in Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, 5 designates a nozzle-supporting ring through which a log 6 is passed by conveyor rolls I or other suitable log conveying means. The log is debarked during its travel through ring 5 by high pressure jets of fluid directed against the surface of the log by radial nozzles 8 which are arranged around the path travelled by the log and are slidably supported by ring 5.

The direction, velocity and volume of the fluid debarking jets through nozzles 8 and the spacing of the latter from the surface of the log being debarked are important factors to be considered in regard to establishing and maintaining optimum conditions for efficient use of the jets. When the jets are directed radially against the surface of the log they remove the bark by abrasion due to impact and are more emcient than jets which are directed tangentially against the surface of the log to remove the bark by a, peeling action. When the jets are directed radially against the surface of the log the number of jets and the consumption of fluid and power required to effect satisfactory removal of the bark is less than when the jets are directed tangentially against the surface of the log. The dryness, thickness of the bark and other characteristics of the log being debarked constitute variable factors which must be taken into consideration in regulating the volume and velocity of the jets to effect economical removal of the bark with minimum removal of the underlying wood. The proper regulation of the jets to take care of these factors can readily be determined by experienced operators.

Experiments have shown that the spacing of the nozzles from the surface of the log must be kept within certain narrow limits to provide the optimum conditions for efficient action of the debarking jets. The optimum spacing selected within these limits is determined in accordance with the character and condition of the logs and other variable factors which can be estimated.

,' One of the important considerations in connection with the relative positioning of the nozzles and log is the use of the minimum number of jets for covering the entire circumference of the largest size log against which the jets are directed and the maintenance of the radial direction of the jets with reference to the surface of the smallest size logs against which the jets are directed.

It will also be understood that. while the described radial direction of the jets against the surface of the log being debarked is preferred, the nozzles 8 may be arranged so that the jets are directed tangentially against the surface of the log. In the latter event the volume and velocity of the fluid jets directed through the nozzles must be increased to give a debarklng action equivalent to that obtained when the jets are directed radially against the log.

According to the preferred embodiment of the present invention the foregoing requirements for is ivqta ly se ur to su po t n b acke 1 by pivot 16 located near the upper end of the lever. gnacket T5 is shown connectin valve casings 56 land 56 which are spaced apart to receive there between the upper endrof lever 14.

Lever 14 is formed to provide a valve opening part 18 extending above the pivot 16 and a second valve opening part [9 located immediately below vsaid pivot. Yalve opening part 18 is arranged to act alternately against stems 51a and 61a. of :yailtdfi and 61 while valve opening part I9 is arranged to act alternately against stems a Jqa of valves and 10.

The lower end of valve operating lever 14 is connected day link Bl to the lower end of a lever 82 intermediately pivoted to a valve operating slide Bi-working in bearings 84 mounted on one .qf the carriage rails 38. The upper end of lever ,Bjjsficonnected to carriage I2;by a valve resetting link 85 which is pivoted at one end to the lever 3,2 and likewise pivoted at the other end to the carriage l2. Flexible slide operating elements :86 and 86 are connected between the opposite ends of slide 83 and the upper extremity of log rider 48. These flexible elements pass through the hollow trunnions 44 of bracket 43 and are trained around suitable guide pulleys 81 carried by frame-structures 3-1 and 41.

When log rider 48, as viewed in Fig. 1, is moved inthedirection indicated by arrow X by a crooked log, the valve operating slide 83, the lower end qflever 82, the link 8| and the lower end of valve operating lever 74 are also moved in the same direotion by the pull of the flexible element 86 connected between the slide and the upper extremityof log rider 4B. The valve operating lever 14 1.51s. 4) is thus swung about pivot 16 so that valve operating part 18 is moved against stem 51a totopen valve 67! while valve operating part 19 is simultaneously moved against stem 60a to open ,valve 50. The opening of valve 6'! permits pressure fluid previously supplied to the left hand end of cylinder 5| to be exhausted by way of pipe 64, valvechamber 65, exhaust chamber 68 and exhaust line 6!. pressure fluid to pass from fluid supply pipe 62 to the right hand end of cylinder 5! by way of valve chambers BI and 55 and pipe 54. Piston 50 and the connected carriage I2 are thus moved .to the left to effect a corresponding movement of ring 5.

When log rider 48 is moved in the direction indicated by arrow X (Fig. l) by a crooked log, the slidefllthe lower end of lever 82, the link 8| and the lower end of valve operating lever 74 are also moved in the same direction by the pull of the flexible element 86. Valve operating lever 14 is thus swung about its pivotal axis 16 so that valve opening part 18 is moved against stem 51:: to open valve 51 while valve opening part 18 is simultaneously moved against stem 10a to open valve Ill. The opening of valve 51 permits the pressure fluid previously supplied to the right hand end of cylinder 5| to be exhausted therefrom by way of pipe 54, valve chambers 55 and 58 and exhaust line 59. The opening of valve 10 permits pressure fluid to pass from pressure fluid supply pipe 12 to the left hand end of cylinder 5] way of valve chambers II and and pipe 54. This results in piston 50 and carriage l2 being shifted to the right to effect a correspond ing movement of ring 5.

Overrunning of ring 5 in either direction is prevented by the action of valve resetting The opening of valve fill permits l nk work n throu h l ver .182" nd l k-81.

moved horizontally in the same direction and to the same extent as the logridergll.

Nozzles B are autornatically positioned a predetermined fixed distance irom log firby nozzleadjusting mechanism operating in response to vertical centering movement of ring 5 in relation to carriage i2. This-nozzle-adj-usting mechanism includes hell-cranks 5 .1 intermediately pivoted to brackets '98 mounted on the outer peripheral portion of ring 5. Ann 99 of each bell-crank 81 is plvotally'connected to the outer end portion of one of the nozzles :8. The remaining arms I00 of bell-cranks '91 are interconnected by link lfll to provide for simultaneous operation of said bellecranks by two main operating links I02, each having oneend pivotally connected to one of the bell-crank arms I00 and the other end pivotally connected to carriage I2. Bell-cranks 91 and links H and Ill! are designed to shift the nozzles radially toward or away from the surface of the log in response to vertical centering movements of ring 5 relative to carriage II, the extentand direction of radial movement of the nozzles being predetermined to maintain a fixed distance between the nozzles and the log for any centered position of ring 5.

The nozzles 8 may be of any suitable design. They extend radially through ring 5 and slide in suitable guide openings I04 so that their delivery ends are always pointed toward the axis of the ring. Their outer ends are connected by flexible pipes N15 to water supply conduit I06 to which Water is delivered under suitable pressure from a pumping system or other source.

The nozzles 8 are shown lying in a common plane but they may be staggered so that each nozzle is qllset in the axial directionof the ring with reference to the next adjacent nozzle. With proper spacing the staggered arrangement of the nozzles enables the entire circumference of the log to be oovered by the jets without interference of the jets ,witheach other.

While not shown in the drawings it will readily be understood that suitable control valves or other means may be provided to regulate the pressure and volumeof the jetsdelivered through the nozzles inaccordance with'thetdiameter, dryness and other conditions of the log being debarked.

In some instances it may be advantageous to employ combined air and water nozzles through which jets of air ,as well as jets of water are directed against the log. in such cases the air may be delivered by each nozzle as an annular jet enveloping and confining a central water jet to prevent excessive spreading of the latter. Sand or other abrasive materials may also be supplied to the nozzles to be entrained by the air and/or Water jets.

In reviewing the complete operation of the hydraulic barking machine described herein it may be noted that the log riding member 48 constitutes a vertically and laterally movable ieeler whose vertical movements are determined by the ,diametertof tthe log passing \therebeneath QAYQAGI and whose lateral movements are determined by the lateral crookedness of the engaging log. The vertical movements of member 48 are transmitted through bracket 43 and the associated valve operating linkage to operate the previously described valve mechanism through which pressure fluid is routed to and from cylinder H to effect corresponding vertical movements of piston 10 and nozzle ring 5. Lateral movements of member 48, due to crookedness of the engaging log, are transmitted through flexible elements 86 and B6 to operate the previously described valve mechanism through which pressure fluid is routed to and from cylinder to efiect corresponding movements of carriage l2 and ring 5 in the lateral direction of the log.

From the foregoing description it will be seen that the vertical centering movements of nozzle ring 5 with respect to the log are determined by the diameter of the log and that the lateral centering movements of ring 5 with respect to the log are determined by the lateral crookedness of the log and that these movements of the ring are effected by mechanisms controlled by movement of the log actuated feeler 48.

During vertical centering movements of ring 5 relative to the log and the ring supporting carriage l2, the nozzle adjusting mechanism comprising bell cranks 81 and links Hill, llll and I02, functions to shift the nozzles B radiall in relation to the center of saidring to maintain the predetermined spacing of the delivery ends of the nozzles from the surface of the log.

Having thus described the nature of my invention and a preferred embodiment thereof, it will be understood that various modifications may be resorted to within the scope and spirit of the invention as defined by the appended claims. For example, various means other than the specific means described herein may be employed for effecting the necessary adjustments of the nozzle ring 5 and the nozzles 8.

I claim:

1.. A log debarking machine comprising. a support, a nozzle carrier provided with a central opening through which a log to be debarked is passed lengthwise, a plurality of nozzles movably mounted on said carrier and normally converging toward the center of said carrier opening, said carrier being mounted on said support for selective vertical and transverse movements in its own plane and with respect to the longitudinal axis of said log, independent means for imparting said vertical and transverse movements to said carrier, means responsive to the vertical movement of said carrier for moving said nozzles toward and away from the center of said carrier opening, and means responsive to the shape of the log to selectively actuate said carrier movement imparting means.

2. A log debarking machine comprising, a, support, a nozzle carrier provided with a central opening through which a log to be debarked is passed lengthwise, a plurality of nozzles movably mounted on said carrier and normally converging toward the center of said carrier opening, said carrier being mounted on said support for selective vertical and transverse movements in its own plane and with respect to the longitudinal axis of said leg, means for imparting said movements to said carrier, means responsive to the vertical movement of said carrier for moving said nozzles toward and away from the center of said carrier opening, and a log-actuated control mechanism operatively connected to said carrier movement imparting means to selectively actuate said movement imparting means.

3. A log debarking machine comprising, a support, a nozzle carrier mounted on said support and provided with a central opening through which the log to be debarked is passed lengthwise, a plurality of nozzles movably mounted on said carrier and normally converging toward the center of said carrier opening, a carriage movable on said support transverse the longitudinal axis of said log, means for imparting transverse movements to said carriage, means mounted on said carriage having attachment with the nozzle carrier and operable to impart vertical movement to said carrier, means responsive to the vertical movement of said carrier for moving said nozzles toward and away from the center of said carrier opening, and means controlled by the shape of the log to selectively actuate said carrier transverse and vertical movement imparting means.

4. A log debarking machine comprising, a support, a nozzle carrier mounted on said support and provided with a central opening through which a log to be debarked is passed lengthwise, a plu rality of nozzles movably mounted on said carrier and normally converging toward the center of said carrier opening, a carriage movable on said support transverse the longitudinal axis of said log, means for imparting transverse movements to said carriage, means mounted on said carriage having attachment with the nozzle carrier and operable to impart vertical movement to said carrier, means responsive to the vertical movement of said carrier for moving said nozzles toward and away from the center of said carrier opening, and log-actuated control means for selectively actuating said carrier transverse and vertical movement imparting means.

5. A log debarking machine comprising, a support, a nozzle carrier mounted on said support and provided with a central opening through which a log to be debarked is passed lengthwise, a plurality of nozzles movably mounted on said carrier and normally converging radially toward the center of said carrier opening, a carriage movable on said support transverse the longitudinal axis of the log to be debarked, power means for effecting transverse movement of said carriage, a power means mounted on said carriage having attachment with said nozzle carrier and operable to effect vertical movement of said nozzle carrier, means responsive to the vertical movement of said carrier for moving said nozzles toward and away from the center of said carrier opening, and log actuated control means to selectively actuate said power means.

6. A log debarking machine comprising, a support, a nozzle carrier mounted on said support and provided with a central opening through which a log to be debarked is passed lengthwise, a plurality of nozzles movably mounted on said carrier and normally converging toward the center of said carrier opening, a carriage movable on said support transverse the longitudinal axis of the log to be debarked, power means for efiectlng transverse movements of said carriage, a power means mounted on said carriage having attachment with said nozzle carrier and operable to efiect vertical movement of said nozzle carrier, means responsive to the vertical movement of said carrier for moving said nozzles toward and away from the center of said carrier opening, and a log-actuated control mechanism having operable connections with said power means to selectively impart vertical and transverse movements to said carrier.

7. A log debarking machine comprising, a support frame, a nozzle carrier mounted on said support frame and provided with a central opening through which a log to be debarked is passed lengthwise, a plurality of nozzles movably mounted on said carrier and normally converging toward the center of said carrier opening, a carriage movable on said frame transverse the longitudinal axis of the log to be debarked, power means for effecting movements of said carriage, valve mechanism for operating said power means, a power lift mounted on said carriage and having connection with the carrier and operable to effect vertical movement of the carrier, valve mechanism for operating the power lift, linkage between the carriage and the carrier and nozzles responsive to movements of said carrier to move said nozzles toward and away from the center of said carrier opening, and means to selectively control and actuate the power means valve mechanism.

8. A log debarking machine comprising, a support frame, a nozzle carrier mounted on said support frame and provided with a central opening through which a log to be debarked is passed lengthwise, a plurality of nozzles movably mounted on said carrier and normally converging radially toward the center of said carrier opening, a carriage movable on said frame transverse the axis of the log to be debarked, power means for efiecting movement of said carriage, valve mechanism for operating said power means, a power lift mounted on said carriage and having connection with the carrier and operable to effect vertical movement of the carrier, valve mechanism for operating the power lift, linkage between the carriage and the carrier and nozzles responsive to the vertical movement of said carrier for moving said nozzles toward and away from the center of said carrier opening, and a log-actuated control mechanism having operable connections with said valve mechanisms to selectively impart vertical and horizontal movements to the nozzle carrier.

9. A log debarking machine comprising, a support, a nozzle carrier provided with a central opening through which a log to be debarked is passed lengthwise, a plurality of nozzles movably mounted on said carrier and normally converging toward the center of said carrier opening, said carrier being mounted on said support for selective vertical movements in its own plane and with respect to the longitudinal axis of said log, means for imparting said vertical movements to said carrier, means responsive to the vertical movement of said carrier for moving said nozzles toward and away from the center of said carrier opening, and means responsive to the shape of the log to selectively actuate said carrier movement imparting means.

FRANK 0. WHITE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,087,959 Lisherness et a1. Feb. 24, 1914 1,090,463 Eidsaether Mar. 17, 1914 1,969,914 Swigert Aug. 14, 1934 2,328,545 Bukowsky Sept. '7, 1943 2,338,136 Shaw et al Jan. 4. 1944 2,342,533 Edwards Feb. 22, 1944 2,393,978 Edwards et a] Feb. 5, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 35,574 Sweden Oct. 1, 1913

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1087959 *Nov 3, 1913Feb 24, 1914 Device for removing bark from logs, limbs of trees, and slabs.
US1090463 *Oct 24, 1912Mar 17, 1914Olaf EidsaetherLog-peeling machine.
US1969914 *Apr 25, 1933Aug 14, 1934Swigert Ernest GApparatus for barking logs
US2328545 *Feb 24, 1941Sep 7, 1943Bukowsky Harry EHydraulic log-barking machine
US2338136 *Aug 3, 1940Jan 4, 1944Allis Chalmers Mfg CoLog barker and cleaner
US2342533 *Jan 21, 1942Feb 22, 1944Weyerhaeuser Timber CoMethod of removing bark from logs
US2393978 *Jul 14, 1942Feb 5, 1946Weyerhaeuser Timber CoLog barking apparatus
SE35574A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2501848 *Apr 10, 1946Mar 28, 1950Rayonier IncLog barker having water-jets oscillatable about longitudinal log axis
US2568554 *Jan 26, 1949Sep 18, 1951Ingersoll Rand CoHydraulic bark remover having certain nozzles controlled by loginterrupted light beam
US2576861 *Nov 18, 1948Nov 27, 1951Allis Chalmers Mfg CoHydraulic barker with multiple nozzle oscillating linkage
US2578804 *Apr 30, 1946Dec 18, 1951Worthington Pump & Mach CorpHydraulic-type log debarker having centripetally directed jets mounted in circumferential groups radially adjustable for different size logs
US2586727 *May 22, 1950Feb 19, 1952Allis Chalmers Mfg CoOscillatable bark-removing jet having variable amplitude of oscillation
US2591751 *Aug 4, 1948Apr 8, 1952Clark W AdamsWhirling roughing and finishing cutterhead machine for debarking logs and the like
US2661781 *Apr 4, 1949Dec 8, 1953Allan Simons HowardHydraulic barking or cleaning apparatus
US2675255 *Jul 26, 1949Apr 13, 1954Macmillan & Bloedel Alberni LtFluid actuated seal
US2691395 *Jul 26, 1951Oct 12, 1954Control Of The Michigan CollegMethod and apparatus for stripping bark
US2738814 *Oct 20, 1954Mar 20, 1956Jackson Ind IncHydraulic slab debarker
US2830629 *Sep 28, 1956Apr 15, 1958Southern Wood Preserving CoWoodworking machine provided with means for automatically positioning its planer head, responsive to dimensional variations in work pieces
US3092158 *Apr 1, 1959Jun 4, 1963Cascade Pole CompanyPole incising mechanism
US3942565 *Jul 26, 1974Mar 9, 1976Clement RatelleLog cleaning and barking
US4723715 *Jan 27, 1986Feb 9, 1988The Curators Of The University Of MissouriBy liquid jet action
US5035362 *Feb 5, 1988Jul 30, 1991Marian MazurkiewiczDisintegration of wood
WO1984003062A1 *Feb 7, 1984Aug 16, 1984Allmaenna IngbyranBarking arrangement
Classifications
U.S. Classification144/208.3, 144/208.8
International ClassificationB27L1/00, B27L1/14
Cooperative ClassificationB27L1/14
European ClassificationB27L1/14