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Publication numberUS2474011 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 21, 1949
Filing dateMar 11, 1947
Priority dateMar 11, 1947
Publication numberUS 2474011 A, US 2474011A, US-A-2474011, US2474011 A, US2474011A
InventorsOverly Lloyd H
Original AssigneeOverly Lloyd H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Structural metal awning
US 2474011 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 21,1949. 1.. -'H. O-VERLY 2,474,01-1' STRUCTURAL METAL AWNING Filed March 11, 1947 4 Sheets- Sheet 1 June 21, 1949. H. OVERLY 4 STRUCTURAL METAL AWNING 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 11, 1947 v L. H. OVERLY F STRUCTURAL METAL AWNING I June 21, 1949.

Filed March 11, 1947 4 She'ets-She et 3 INVENTOR. BY A. 0-

@Q i? GLW June 21,1949. g, H. QVERLY 2,414,011

STRUCTURAL METAL AWNING Filed March 11, 1947 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented June 21, 1949 UNITED STAT-as PATENT orrlca STRUCTURAL mar. AWNING Hoyd H. Overly. Mlle, Tenn.

Application March 11, 1947, Serial No. 133,874

comm.

This invention relates broadly to the art of structural metal awnings and in its more specific aspects it relates to structural metal awnings for installation on the exterior of buildings and the like, and is endowed with characteristics producing an awning of great flexibility in its application, and the nature and objects of this invention will be readily recognized and understood by those skilled in the arts to which it relates in the light of the following explanation and detailed description of the accompanying drawings illustrating what I at present believe to be the preferred embodiments and mechanical expressions of the invention from among various other forms, arrangements, combinations and constructions, of which the invention is capable within the spirit and scope thereof.

It is well known that metal awnings are endowed with many favorable characteristics which are not to be found in the usual awning having 'a metallic or wood framework between which fabric is stretched. It is obvious that such old type awnings quickly deteriorate, should be removed in winter, and flap and tear themselves to pieces when left in operative position during heavy winds.

These disadvantageous factors which I believe are to be found in practically every old type fabric awning are overcome in a structural metallic awning of the general character of my invention.

It has been found in metal awnings which are now known and which have been put to practical use, that certain characteristics thereof are undesirable. A metal awning of the character of my invention, while it may be dismantled and removed from installed operative position on a building or the like structure, is adapted and constructed for permanent installation in its operative building mounted position. It will be appreciated that a metal awning of this type is not adjustable to inoperative positions as in the old type fabric awning. In a shade producing installation including the old type folding or collapsible fabric awnings, it was merely necessary to adjust the awning to inoperative position when it was necessary to dispose a ladder or the like against the'side of the building in order to wash I awning. The structural metal awning of this invention is-so constructed that the above described access may be easily gained and it is therefore a purpose of this invention to provide a structural metal awning. of non-folding, noncollapsible type which permits easy access to areas of the building disposed above the awning.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a metal awning having one or more removable panels therein through which a ladder or the like may be projected for gaining access to the area above the awning.

I have also designed my awning structure so that the removable panels may be firmly disposed in operative awning associated positions and may be rapidly and easily displaced from association with theawning for the purposes above outlined.

A further characteristic of my structural metal awning resides in the provision of means for removably locking removable panels in operative association with the structure without requiring the use of screws, rivets, or the like securing means which would require considerable time and labor in unfastening in order to remove the panel.

Since awnings of this character are installed over building openings of various dimensions, it is necessary, in order to provide a useful and successful structure, to provide a fabrication of sufllcient flexibility so that the basic structural characteristics thereof need not be changed to tnake the awning adaptable for each installaion.

It is therefore a further object of this invention I to provide an awning which may be made in various lengths and in which the number of removable panels may be varied without departing from the basic structural concept of the invention.

It is desirable and advantageous in a metal awning to provide means to prevent the formation of hot air pockets under the awning and it is therefore a feature of my invention to provide adjustable ventilating means in the awning.

Another characteristic of this invention resides in the feature of construction whereby a removable panel may with facility and without complete reconstruction be changed into an adjustable ventilator.

A further purpose of this invention is to provide a metallic awning structure which provides strength in the basic frame work and additional reinforcing means at the points of greatest stress.

Another feature and characteristic of my invention resides in the ease of the mounting means for the awning draperies.

A further object of my invention is to provide a structural metal awning which is relatively non-complex to fabricate and which is substantially rigid in its construction.

It is an object of one form of my invention to provide a metal awning of a sectional character which may be sold in knocked-down condition and easily assembled for installation on the job by unskilled workers.

it is a further object of this form of my-invention to provide a sectional metal awning which is so constructed that sections thereof may be removed if desired while other sections thereof i remain in installed position.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a metal awning so formed and constructed that metal having different finishes may be used for the different sections to provide a highly pleasing decorative effect.

In this form of my invention embodying a metal awning of a. sectional nature. it has been my purpose to devise an awning which is inexpensive to produce and fabricate and may be easily installed.

With the foregoing general objects, features. and results in view, as well as certain others which will be apparent from the following explanation, the invention consists in certain novel features and designs, construction, mounting and combination of elements as will be more fully and particularly referred to and specified hereinafter.

Referring to the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of an awning installation.

Fig. 2 is a view in end elevation with the end wall and end drapery removed.

Fig. 3 is a view taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2 of the drawings.

Fig. 4 is a view in front elevation of an awning with parts thereof illustrated in section.

Fig. 5 is a front view in vertical section through the roof panels of the awning.

Fig. 6 is an end view in vertical section through a removable panel.

Fig. 7 is an end view in vertical section through a ventilating panel.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the panel fastening means, parts of the panel and awning structure being broken away.

Fig. 9 is a vertical sectional view showing a set of gutters with which the awning is provided.

Fig. 10 is a view taken on line ltl0 of Fig. 2 of the drawings.

Fig. 11 is a view in side elevation of a modified form of awning structure.

Fig. 12 is a view in front elevation of the modifled form of awning illustrated in Fig. 11 of the drawings.

Fig. 13 is a view taken on the line l3-l3 of Fig. 11 of the drawings.

Fig. 14 is a view taken on the line I 4- of Fig. 12 of the drawings.

Fig. 15 is a view taken on the line lB-l 5 of Fig. 11 of the drawings.

Referring to the drawings wherein like characters of reference designate similar parts throughout the several views thereof, the structural metal awning of this invention may be fabricated 'of' sheet metal and comprises what I shall term a basic supporting structure composed of a plurality of members so integrated that a substantially rigid structural frame work is produced, the frame work being adapted to mount and support various members, which when combined with the frame work provide a complete awning structure. I have so fabricated the various elements of the supporting structure that they may be associated together in forming a complete and operative structural metal awning with great facility.

The dimensions of the basic supporting structure may be varied within relatively wide limits this invention may be fabricated in different sizes without varying the structural characteristics of the basic supporting structure.

The basic supporting structure or frame work includes a downwardly depending supporting flange i which is disposed for flat engagement against and fastening to the wall 8 of a building, the lower edge of flange I may be upwardly folded as at b to reinforce and strengthen the lower flange edge. At the upper edge, the flange i is folded over on itself to provide a further flange I of reduced width or depth relative to flange i. the two flanges when in operative awning mounted positions lie in flat engagement. The flanges l and l are fastened to the walLby means of a plurality of screws, nails or the like 9. It will be evident from consideration of the drawings that the flanges i and 1 form a part of the basic supporting structure of the awning and provide the means for mounting the structure to a building wall, and that such flanges extend the width of the awning.

I provide a top cross rail II, as a part of the basic supporting structure which rail depends downwardly at an oblique angle to flanges I and I with which it is integrally formed. The top cross rail provides the uppermost slanting surface of the awning proper. At the lower edge thereof the top cross rail is folded under to provide an upwardly inclined under flange is.

Referring particularly to Fig. 10 of the drawings, it will be evident that the top rail II at each transverse end thereof is inwardly bent to pro= vide an inwardly extending flange It, the inner end of which is formed to provide an outwardly extending flange l1 whereby an inwardly directed pocket i9 and an outwardly directed pocket 2| is provided by the particular folding arrangement of the rail H at the endsthereof.

The basic supporting structure includes a bottom cross rail which is disposed in spaced relation to the top cross rail, and I have designated this bottom cross rail in its entirety by the numeral 23. The bottom cross rail as in the case of the top cross rail extends the full width of the awning and embodies a vertically disposed depending apron portion 25 and a top inclined portion 21 which forms a'portion of the awning top surface. As in the case of the top cross rail, the bottom cross rail 23 is of the width of the awning structure. The transverse edges of the upper portion 21 of the lower cross rail are inwardly bent as at 29, topprovide flanges forming a pocket for a purpose to be hereinafter described.

The vertical transverse edges of the apron portion 25, of cross rail 23, are inwardly folded as at St to provide a pocket for a purpose to be hereinafter described. i

The apron 25 at its bottom edge is upwardl bent as at 33, the upper edge of which is folded to provide a downwardly extending pocket forming flange 35. It will be appreciated, particularly from consideration of Figs. 2 and 6 of the drawings, that the downward directed pocket is provided by and between flanges 33 and 35.

The top and bottom cross rails which have been hereinbefore described are rigidly associated in the awning structure by means of up and down to accommodate the awning to wall openings of various dimensions, for obviously the size of wall openings which are to be protected'by the awning will differ in their dimensions. The awnings of or inclined end members and a plurality of intermediate connecting members, the number of such intermediate connecting members being dependent upon the width of the awning being fabricated. The connecting members are spaced apart one from the other and also from the end mein- 7 here.

and rigidly connect the top and bottom cross rails,'extend at substantially the same inclination as do the top and bottomrails. Each edge of, each end rail 3'! of an awning extends upwardly into the pocket I! which is formed by the folds provided by the transverse edge of top rail ii. The end rails 31 may be secured at their upper ends to the top cross rail where they extend thereunder by means of riveting or in any other convenient and desirable manner. The lower ends of the end rails extend under the upper portion 21 of bottom cross rail 23, extending into the pocket 29 which is formed by the particular folding of the transverse edges of the upper portion 2'! of the bottom cross rail. The bottom crow rail and the lower end of the end rails may be fastened together in any convenient manner such as by provides a further structural support for the end the gutters and "which areformed on the longitudinal edges oftthe end and intermediate mils. Formed integrally withthe lower end of. each flange II. I provide a portionextendingfor wardly 'at substantially right angles thereto, this portion ll'providing'across brace which extends '5 from'and between the gutters-of each end rail extending under and in contact with the gutters gutters 48 as shown at 88 in Fig. 9. ,Itwill thus be seen that .this particular bracing member I! and intermediate rails.

riveting. It will be evident that the end rails extend from substantially the apron II to the uppermost end of the top cross rai-l I i.

The outer longitudinal edge of each end rail between the top and bottom cross rails is inwardly bent as at 39 and is then outwardly bent as at II to provide an outwardly directed pocket particularly as shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings. A downwardly depending flange or wall 43 extends along the entire inner longitudinal edge of the end rails, the lower end of the flange 43 being horizontally disposed as at 45, the inner edge of the horizontal portion being upwardly bent and folded on itself to provide an upstanding lip 41. It will thus be seen that a gutter 48 is formed by the particular construction and configuration of the inner longitudinal edge of each end rail, and that the gutter extends the length of the en rails.

As I have hereinbefore stated, each metallic awning structure of the character of the one described in this application, comprises the end rails and one or more intermediate up and down or inclined rails which form a part of the supporting structure or frame work. In the drawings, I have designated such intermediate rails in their entirety by the numeral 49, such rails extending the full depth of the awning structure. Each of such intermediate rails includes a top plane por-- tion 5|, longitudinal flanges 53 depending from each longitudinal edge thereof, and upstanding lips 55 spaced inwardly from the flanges. It will be evident that longitudinally extending gutters ii are provided along the opposite longitudinal edges of each intermediate rail 48. The intermediate rails at their upper and lower ends extend under the top and bottom cross rails ii and 21 respectively to which they may be secured by riveting or in any desirable manner.

As disclosed particularly in Figs. 1, 4 and 5 of the drawings, a completed awning structure includes a pair of end rails and one or more intermediate rails, all of which are associated together to provide a substantially rigid metallic awning.

I provide upper and lower cross reinforcing members for additional bracing of the end rails and the intermediate rails. The upper reinforcing or brace rods 51 are provided in the following manner. Between the end rails and the next adjacent intermediate rail and between intermediate rails, the under flange II of top cross rail I I is downwardly bent at substantially right angles to provide a flange 59 which extends substantially the entire width of the space between an. end rail and an intermediate rail or between intermediate rails, the lower portion of said flange being cut out for the reception therethrough of A generally similar arrangement is provided for the lower ends of the intermediate and end rails. Between the endrails and the intermediate rails, and between intermediate rails,-1 provide a downwardly depending flange 6| integrally formed with the inclined portion 21 of lower cross rail 23, such flange 6| being provided with a for- .wardly extending brace member 63, which extends from and between the gutters on each end rail in contact with the gutters of all of the intermediate rails, for reinforcing thereof.

It will be appreciated from the above description that the basic supporting structure comprises spaced top and bottom cross rails connected by end rails and one or more intermediate rails or bars. I have devised novel and highly advantageous means for closing the openings which occur between either the end rails and intermediate rails, or between the intermediate rails. I utilize what I shall term roof panels which are formed of sheet metal and comprise a. top flat portion 65 of substantially the same configuration as that defined by the opening between the intermediate and end rails, however, the roof panel top 5 is of greater length and width than is the opening which it is adapted to enclose so that it may rest upon the edges of the intermediate and end rails defining the opening or upon the edges of intermediate rails when the opening is so defined. The upper end of the roof panel when in operative position e:-:tends under the lower edge of the top cross rail, while the lower end of the roof panel rests upon the upper longitudinal surface of the portion 21 of lower cross rail 23.

Each roof panel element includes the upper top surface 65 and depending transverse and longitudinal integrally formed flanges 61 downwardly extending from the lower side of the top surface 65 and spaced inwardly a distance from the edges thereof. The downwardly depending flanges may be reinforced by an upwardly bent portion 69. The downwardly depending flanges 61 are inwardly spaced relative to the transverse and longitudinal edges of the top surfaces 65, a distance so that such flanges may snugly flt within the openings between end rails and intermediate rails or between intermediate rails, the flange 61 snugly bearing against the flanges 43.01 the end rails and/or the flanges 53 of the intermediate rails.

Since the downwardly depending flanges 61 are integrally formed with the top 65 of each roof panel, a fold ,H results, providing a pocket 13 between the top 65 and the fold portion H. The purpose of this pocket will become apparent as this description proceeds.

In order to removably mount the roof panels, in the openings between the rails and to guard against the undesired removal of these panels, I provide a plurality of locking members designated generally by the numeral ii for locking 7 association between each roof panel and the gutters l3 and 5B of the end rails and intermediate rails respectively to which the roof panel is attached. The locking members comprise a soft metal cleat including a locking leg II, which is centrally notched as at I9 and further includes an extended portion 8| integrally formed with said locking leg II. The roof panels are preferably formed with the extending end portions 8| of the locking cleats fixedly disposed by welding or the like in the pockets 73 which are provided by fold II in the roof panels. It will be evident from consideration, particularly of Fig. 4 of the drawings, that the locking members I5 are flxed in spaced relation along the under side of the roof panel.

When a roof panel is disposed in position preparatory to being removably locked by means of the locking cleats 75, the depending notched locking legs I? will extend from the roof panel below the gutters of supporting end or intermediate rails. In order to removably look a roof panel in position, the mechanic catches hold of one end of the locking leg I! with a pair of pliers and pulls thereon, which action pulls the roof panel tightly down into position whereupon the end of the tongue on the other side of the notch TI is folded around under the gutter and then the end which was held by the pliers is wrapped about the gutter in the same manner, all to assume operative locking position as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 8.

In many instances where metal awnings of the type of this invention are mounted in operative position on the wall of a building it is necessary to gain access to the wall area above the awning, and this may be done by merely removing one or more of the roof panels, whereupon a ladder may be inserted through the opening between the end and intermediate rails. panel, it is merely necessary to grasp with a pair of pliers or the like, the ends of the locking leg of the cleat which are folded under and around the gutter and bend such leg into position so that the panel may be removed and the leg of the cleat will not catch upon the gutter. Of course, this operation must be done for each cleat which is employed in the locking of a roof panel. In the average installation, I have found that three cleats are generally suflicient for each side of a roof panel.

I have found that it is often desirable to provide some means for permitting hot air which may accumulate under the awnings, to escape therefrom. I have provided ventilating means which is simple to construct and easy to operate and does not substantially alter the basic awning structural features.

The ventilating means which I utilize consists of constructing one or any desired number of the roof panels in a particular installation with pivoting means at one end, so that the roof panel .may be lifted and supported in such lifted position to thereby provide an opening through the top of the awning.

In Fig. '7 of the drawings, I have illustrated a ventilating roof panel and have shown in dotted lines such panel in lifted open ventilating position. A roof panel which is to function as a ventilator, is provided at its upper end with a transverse spindle 89 which extends through the downwardly depending flanges 61, of the roof panel and is pivotly supported in apertures which are provided in the downwardly depending flanges 53 of the adjacent gutters. As a supporting In order to remove a means, I provide at the forward or lower end of the ventilating roof panel, a supporting bar 9|. pivoted as at 93 to the underside of the top surface 55 of the roof panel, the forward edge of the supporting bar SI being provided with a plurality of notches 95, therein for receiving the upper edge of the supporting cross braces 53. It will thus be evident that all that is necessary to raise and support in raised position a roof panel, is to take hold of the lower end of the supporting bar SI, swing the same upwardly so that the notched portion is clear of the cross brace 63, and then push upwardly to thereby open the panel to any desired position where it may be maintained by inserting the upper edge of the cross brace 63 in the adjacent notch.

At each end of the awning, I provide end panels 97, having at the rear vertical edge thereof, an inwardly directed flange 99, and at the upper inclined edge thereof an inwardly directed flange ma, which in operative position is disposed within. the pocket formed by the flanges 39 and M of the end rails 31. The upper end or portion of the inclined flange WI is disposed within the outwardly directed pocket l5, which is formed by the folding of the transverse edge of the top cross rail H. The lower portion of the inclined flange IIlI, extends into the pocket 29 which is formed by the folding of the transverse edge of inclined portion 21 of the lower cross rail 23. clined edge ill! of the end panels is secured in position within the aforementioned folds of the various flanges described by riveting, screwing or in any other desired manner.

The front vertical edge of the end panel is provided with an inwardly directed flange I03, which is secured in any manner within the pocket provided by the folding of the flanges 39, which are provided at the vertical edges of the apron 25.

Along the lower edge of the end panels, I provide an upwardly extending flange or fold I05, formed with a downwardly depending flange I01 spaced therefrom providing a downwardly directed pocket extending theentire depth of the awning, that is, from the rear end to the forward end of each end panel.

The drapery which I shall designate in its entirety by the numeral I09 and which extends preferably across the front of the awning and along each side is preferably fabricated from one piece of sheet'metal to provide an integral drapery unit. At the upper edge III], the drapery is provided with a folded over portion III, from the lower edge of which projects a substantially inwardly directed horizontal flange I I3, and a fold over element II5. While I have disclosed in the drawings the drapery I09 as being formed integrally with the members I I I, I I3, and I I5, it is to be understood that the drapery may with equal success, be a unit separate from the reinforcing member comprising the elements III, H3, and

In assemblying the drapery to the awning structure, the upper portion thereof including the leg I I I, is inserted in the pockets formed in the end panels by the folds I05 and I01, and the upper portions of the drapery and leg I I I, which extend along the front of the awning are inserted in the pocket provided by the flanges 33 and 35, which are formed integral with and along the lower edges of the apron of lower cross rail 23. The drapery I09 is secured in place within the pockets formed by the flanges of apron 25 and end panels 91 by riveting or by means of sheet metal screws or in any other desirable manner. It will be evi- The in-/ I 9 dentthattheflangesIIIandIllwillprojectinwardly and along with the leg III. will provide a very satisfactory and strong reinforcing means for the lower part of the awning, these horizontal flanges H3 and III are cut at their corners in such manner that they may be fastened together by screws or the like I", at the meeting corners thereof.

In Figs. 11 through 15 of the drawings, I have illustrated a modifled form of my invention. In this type of metal awning, I have provided a structure composed of a plurality of panel sections spaced apart by intermediate panel sections, adjacent intermediate sections and panel sections being separably fastened together and each of such sections providing the roof portions and the front drapery portion of the awnings, and I also removably combine with the panel and intermediate rail sections, side or end draperies to complete the awning structure.

Each awning comprises a plurality of independent elongated panel sections generally designated by the numeral I I3. Each of the panel sections I I9 comprises a substantially vertically disposed supporting flange I2I which is adapted to be secured to a supporting wall I23 or the like. The panel sections III include an inclined roof forming or top portion I25 and a front drapery portion III which is downwardly inclined at an angle oblique to the angle of the roof or top portion. The longitudinal edges of the roof and drapery portion I25 and I21, respectively, are inwardly lapped as at Ill, from the inner end of which lap or fold-over, I provide a downwardly depending flange "I.

The panel sections III are spaced apart and removably fastened to an adjacent intermediate panel section which I shall designate in its entirety by the numeral I33. Each intermediate panel section which is removably fastened to each adjacent panel section comprises a supporting flange I which is adapted to be fastened to the wall or other supporting structure I23 in any desirable manner, and each intermediate section also comprises a roof or top portion I31 which is downwardly inclined, and a drapery forming portion I39, which extends downwardly at an oblique angle to the roof portion. The longitudinal edges of the roof and drapery forming portions I31 and I39 respectively, of the intermediate panel section, are downwardly bent providing a flange I the lower end of which is formed to provide a horizontally extending portion I43, which in turn is upwardly bent at its inner edge to provide a flange I45, which structure produces a gutter I". Thus, each intermediate panel section provides a gutter extending along and disposed below the longitudinal edges thereof.

In assembling the panel sections just described, an intermediate panel section I33 is fastened to the wall or the like structure by means of the supporting flange III. This first installed intermediate section provides the end intermediate section and therefore is disposed on the wall a distance, from the position one end of the awning will take, equal to the width of a panel section I I3. Any panel section H9 is then used to form the awning end and is disposed with the depending flange I3I thereof in position abutting the depending flange IlI of the intermediate section, whereupon this awning end forming panel section is secured to the wall or like structure by nailing or otherwise fastening the supporting flange I 2| thereto. It will be evident that the .the inner major supporting section fastening into the wall I23.

auacu lap or fold-over III will lap over and rest upon the intermediate panel section I33.

With a panel section and an end section in the positions described, they are removably fastened together by screws and nuts I or in any other convenient manner. In order to reinforce and strengthen the structure, I may employ gusset plates or the like I5I which are fastened to the depending flange Ill and extend between such flange of the roof section I 3'! and the drapery section I33 to reinforce them at the angle therebetween. A panel section is then installed in like manner on the other side or edge of the intermediate section and fastened thereto, then an intermediate section is installed, and so on, depending upon the width of the awning.

It will be appreciated from the above description of the method of installing the sectional awning of this form of my invention that panel sections I I9 are always used as the end sections or members of a completed awning and that the entire awning roof and front panel drapery structure is composed of a series of alternately positioned panel and intermediate sections, all being separably fastened together in the manner described. It will also be clear that the number of panel and intermediate sections which compose an awning is dependent upon the desired width of the completed awning structure.

When the roof and front drapery forming panel and intermediate sections have all been installed, each end forming panel section II9, will provide at the awning ends downwardly depending flanges I3I. These end flanges provide the supporting means for the awning end or side draperies which are about to bedescribed.

The side or end draperies are structurally generally similar to the panel sections which form the roof and front draperies, and are of sectional structure so that the awning end draperies are composed of a plurality of independent vertically disposed separably associated end drapery,

sections.

The end drapery structure of my awning com prises an inner major drapery supporting section I53 which is adapted to provide the end drapery section which is disposed against and fastened to the wall or supporting structure I23 by means of screws, nails, rivets or the like I55, which extend through an inwardly directed flange I51 of I53, for This flange. I51 is bent and extends from one longitudinal edge of this section I53. The other or opposite longitudinal edge of section I53 is provided with an inwardly directed flange I59 and a fold-over IGI which provides an outwardly directed pocket formed by the flange I59 and the fold-over I'GI. The top transverse edge of end section I53 is obliquely cut so that when the section is positioned with the flange I51 against the wall, the inclined top will mate with the inclination of the roof portion of panel section I I9, the end section I53 being vertically disposed. The top of the section I53 lies flat against the depending flange I3I of panel section I I9, and is separably fastened thereto by means of screws andnuts or the like I53.

The end drapery structures for each end of the awning are composed'of the end drapery major supporting sections I53 and alternately disposed panels I65 and I61, the panel I55 having the longitudinal edges lappedlas at I59, which laps the end major supporting panel I53 is received in the pocket provided by flanges I59 and I'BI upper edges cut to conform to the outline of the roof portion and front drapery portions of panel section H9. All of the sections I53, I65, and I61, are removably fastened to the dependingflange I'3I by means of the screws and nuts or the like I use.

Thus, each end drapery structure is compose of an independent end member I53 and a series of independent alternately spaced end sections I85 and intermediate end sections I61, the latter providing at their longitudinal edges, pockets for receiving the inwardly directed flanges of the en sections I65.

An awning of sectional construction such as that illustrated in Figs. 11 to 15 of the drawings may provide a highly decorative effect without requiring the application of any finishing paint or the like thereto. The various sections from which the awning is composed may be furnished in metals having different finishes so as to provide a striped efiect. Or this striped effect may be achieved by painting the panels various colors. It will also be understood, that the awnings may be sold in knocked-down condition, that is the various panel sections may be separately manufactured and sold and shipped to the job and then installed and combined to produce a complete awning structure.

I claim:

1. In a structural metal awning, a basic su porting structure adapted to be mounted on the wall of a building, said structure including a plurality of members, certain of said members spaced apart providing openings therebetween, roof panels mounted on and supported by said members for closing the openings, and flexible means fixedly attached to said roof panels and extending therefrom, the extending section of said means having independently movable portions, and substantially rigid means depending from certain of said members of the structure, the independently movable portions of said flexible means being manipulable for releasable locking association with said substantially rigid means,'for removably locking said panels on the members of said structure.

2. In a structural metal awning, a basic supporting structure adapted to be mounted on the wall of a building, said structure including a plurality of members, certain of said members spaced apart providing openings therebetween. roof panels mounted on and supported by said members for closing the openings, flexible locking means fixedly attached to said roof panels and extending therefrom, and rigid means depending from certain of the members of said structure, the flexible locking means being manipulable for releasable locking association with said rigid means for removably locking said panels on the members of said structure, said rigid means providing a gutter disposed below the roof panels and the members of said structure to catch leakage occurring therebetween.

3. In a structural metal awning, a basic sup- 12 porting structure adapted to be mounted on the wall of a building, said structure including spaced up and down rails having gutters depending from at least one longitudinal edge thereof anddisposed below the rails in position to catch drippings from the rail edges, and spaced top and bottom cross rails fastened to the ends of said up and down rails, and removable panels mounted between and supported by the spaced up and down rails and the spaced cross rails, said panels having depending flanges extending into the gutters when the panels are in position on the structure.

4. In a structural metal awning, a basic supporting structure adapted to be mounted on the wall of a building, said structure including spaced up and down rails having gutters depending from at least one longitudinal edge thereof and disposed below the rails in position to catch drip pings from the rail edges, and removable panels mounted between and supported by the spaced up and down rails, said panels having depending flanges extending into the gutters when the panels are in position on the structure, and means for supporting said up and down rails.

5. In a structural metal awning, a basic supporting structure adapted to be mounted on the wall of a building, said structure including end rails having gutters depending from the longitudinal inner edg'es thereof in position to catch drippings from the rails, and top and bottom rails fastened to the ends of said end rails, and an intermediate rail fastened at the ends thereof to said top and bottom rails and spaced from said end rails, said intermediate rail having. gutters formed along and below the longitudinal edges having depending flanges extending into the gutters when the panel is in position on the structure. I

6. In a structural metal awning, a basic supporting structure adapted to be mounted on a wall of a building, said structure including spaced up and down rails having gutters depending from at least one longitudinal edge thereof and disposed below the rails in position to catch drippings from the rail edges, and spaced top and bottom cross rails fastened to the ends of said up and down rails, and removable panels mounted between and supported by the spaced up and down rails and the spaced cross rails, and said bottom cross rail including an apron portion, the apron portion having a pocket formed therein for receiving a drapery.

LLOYD H. OVERLY.

Hursey et al. Sept. 14, 1948

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2602199 *Apr 8, 1948Jul 8, 1952Kenlane Mfg Company IncAssembled awning structure
US2613404 *Sep 6, 1949Oct 14, 1952Reconstruction Finance CorpAwning
US2619691 *Jul 11, 1949Dec 2, 1952Bottom John RMetal awning
US2619692 *Oct 26, 1949Dec 2, 1952Jesse C TomblinAwning construction
US2629146 *Dec 30, 1949Feb 24, 1953Tittsworth Arthur FAwning construction
US2639477 *Nov 24, 1950May 26, 1953Dudley MelanconResilient fastener for rigid ventilated awnings
US2680886 *May 5, 1950Jun 15, 1954Wayland D KeithAwning
US2685716 *Feb 13, 1950Aug 10, 1954Evans Walter LAwning
US2731685 *Nov 29, 1951Jan 24, 1956Hastings Aluminum Products IncAwning construction
US2736932 *Mar 5, 1952Mar 6, 1956Ray Felbert AAwning structure
US5001875 *Jul 14, 1989Mar 26, 1991Vincent CacioppoPrefabricated roof structure and support for bay and bow type windows
US5511348 *Oct 8, 1991Apr 30, 1996Steelcase Inc.Furniture system
US5724778 *May 25, 1995Mar 10, 1998Steelcase Inc.Furniture system
US6003275 *Oct 19, 1998Dec 21, 1999Steelcase Development Inc.Furniture system
US6134844 *Jun 24, 1997Oct 24, 2000Steelcase Inc.Method and apparatus for displaying information
US6170200Aug 27, 1999Jan 9, 2001Steelcase Development Inc.Furniture system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/74, 52/64, 52/455, 52/552, 52/630, 52/478, D25/57, 52/76
International ClassificationE04F10/00, E04F10/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04F10/08
European ClassificationE04F10/08