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Publication numberUS2475047 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1949
Filing dateNov 3, 1944
Priority dateNov 3, 1944
Publication numberUS 2475047 A, US 2475047A, US-A-2475047, US2475047 A, US2475047A
InventorsPeles Julius Stanley
Original AssigneePeles Julius Stanley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Birdproofing
US 2475047 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 5 1949. J. s. PELES 5,0 7

BIRDPROOFING Filed Nov. 3, 1944 2 Sheets-Shaqt 1 Fig 1 IIA INVENTOR. JULIUS STANLEY PELES y 1949. J. s. PELES I 2,475,047

nmornoomue Filed Nov. '5, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fiji 7 I Fig .6

- INVENTOR.

. 8/ JULIUS STANLEY PELES ATTORNEY Patented July 5, 1949 UNITED .S TATE-S P "TENT OFFICE 3 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements 'in birdproofing. Such material is applied to buildings or other structures which are infested with birds to prevent them from alighting thereon. The present invention relates to the type o'f'birdproo'fing of which the protecting elements are in the -form of upstanding rigid wires. 'In that type of structure these protecting elements are usually interconnected by other wires and the assembly of theparts thereof is difficult and expensive and the resultant structure is flimsy and short lived. The object of the presentinvention is to provide a durable construction which is free of the "aforesaid and other objectionable features inherent in former devices and which is inexpensive to make and easy to apply to desired structures.

These and other objects of the invention will appear in the following specification "and its novel features will be set forth in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a sectional elevation of a structure which is made according to and embodies my invention. In this figure the parts of the "device are separated somewhat in order to illustrate the construction more clearly.

Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional elevation;

Fig. 3 is an inverted'plan view-on an enlarged scale of the structure shown in Fig. 1, with parts broken away and-other parts shown in section;

Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional elevation of a modified form of the device;

Another modification is shown in transverse sectional elevation in Fig. 5';

Fig. 6 is an inverted plan view of the arrangement shown in Fig. '5;

Fig. 7 an elevation of a further modification;

Fig. 8 is a transverse 'secti'onal elevation and Fig. 9 a plan view of the construction shown in Fig.7

Fig. 10 is a plan view of a still l-urth'er modification;

Fig. 11 is a modification of the arrangement shown in Fig. 5,

Fig. 12 is a modification of a part of the ar- 'rangeinen't shown in Fig. ll, "and Fig. 13and laare modified forms of protective elements.

Referring first "to "Figs. 1-3, H and llA'desighate a plurality of similar protective elements which may be made of wire. each of which comprises a. pair of parallel shafts 1' 2, 123 of unequal lengths interconnected at one end -by integral tie portions l l, MA also of different lengths, pref- 'erably forming right angles with the shafts. From the other ends of the tie aport'ions M, l-IA shafts l3, I3A extend upwardly. As shown in Fig. 1., the shafts l3 are shorter than the shafts 12 0f the same protective units; the shafts I ZA are longer than the shafts 1-2, and the shafts l3 are shorter than theshaf-ts t2, but longer than the shafts 13. The upper ends of the longer shafts 12, 12A are bent over to form loops 15, I5A for the purpose of preventing injury to the birds. The shafts are made of different lengths in order to ward off birds of different sizes.

29 is a base constructed of any desired material such for example as sheet metal. This is a longitudinally continuous member which, as clearly shown in Fig. 3., is in cross :section, in the form of an inverted trough with flanges extending outwardly from open sides. The upper part 2| of this base is flat and in it are two rows of longitudinally spaced perforations '22 and 23 slightly offset transversely from each other 20 through which the shafts I2, 12A and .13, 13A of 55 13 of the elements H, is shorter than the space the protective elements pass. When the upper ends of the shafts T2 are bent over to form loops T5, the perforations through which they pass are in the form of longitudinally disposed slots. The other perforations are circular.

Sides "24, extend downwardly from the part '21. These sides converge inwardly, asshown, and tend to hold the protective elements in place. Flanges 26, '21 of unequal width extend outwardly and downwardly from the lower edges of these sides. Longitudinally spaced holes are provided in the wider flanges 21 for the reception of screws '28 or other holding means for securing the device to a desired structure. This forces the lower edges of the sides 24, 25 nearer to each other and increases their holding effect on the protective elements.

The protective elements are assembled in the base in the following manner: The shaft I2 of the element I is passed through one of the perforations in the row 22 audits-shaft l3 passed through a perforation in the row 23. Then the shaft 12 of the element HA is passed through one of the perforations in the row 23 and its shaft I3A through a, perforation in the row 22 and so on, thus getting an interlocking effect between the tie portions I l, MA 'of the protective elements. It will be seen thatas viewed in Fig. '3, the tie portions it of one of the protective elements 'll passes over the tie portion A of one of the elements HA and that the tie portion M of the next element I! passes under the tie portion MA of 'thesain'e element PIA. In order to get this desired effect the space between the shafts 1'2 and 3 between the shafts l2 and |3A of the elements HA. After the tie portions have been pushed up to the part 2| of the base, its sides 24, may be pressed inwardly. If desired the tie portions may be covered with solder or cement as shown at 29 in Fig. 2.

This construction illustrated in Figs. 1-3 is applicable for use on narrow ledges. For wider ledges the construction illustrated in Fig. 4 is preferable. In this case the upper part ZIA of the base 28A is wider and the rows of perforations therein are more widely separated. This enables the protective elements to be positioned divergently, as shown, and to thus be capable of protecting a wider space. In this case a strip 29A may be placed under the tie portions of the protective elements and riveted to the upper part 2|A of the base as shown.

The base 36 of the construction illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6 is a longitudinally continuous member having an upper portion 3| and integral sides 32 and 33 extending downwardly and divergently therefrom. 34 is a longitudinal row of equally spaced holes through the transverse center of the portion 3| at right angles thereto. Similarly spaced holes 35 and 36 are provided in the sides 32 and 33 respectively intermediate the holes 34 and at right angles to these sides.

Similar protective elements 40, 40A and 403 each having shafts 4|, 42 interconnected by portions 43, pass through these holes, preferably in the sequence shown. Shaft 4| of element 40 passes through one of the holes in the row 34 and its shaft 42 passes through the next adjacent hole to the right in the same row, as shown in Fig. 6. The shafts of next element 40 are similarly placed in the next two holes in the row 34 and so on.

The shaft 4! of the element 40A is placed in the hole in row 35 between the shafts 4| and 42 of element 4!! and its shaft 42 in the next adjacent hole to the right in the same row. The shafts 4| and 42 of element 40B are placed in the holes in row 36 in such relative position as to bring its shaft 4| in transverse alinement with the shaft 42 of element 45A. In Fig. 5 a strap 45 is shown for securing the device to a desired structure. It has a portion which surrounds the base 30 and parallel perforated portions extending laterally from the base through which a screw 46 or the like may be passed. If desired, the connecting portions may be covered with solder or cement 29, Fig. 5.

Although the arrangement shown in Figs. 5 and 6 has a comparatively narrow base, it is capable of protecting an area of considerable Width.

The longitudinal continuous base 50 in Figs. 7-10 has a fiat horizontal portion 5| along one edge of which is an upstanding flange 52. It is bent back upon itself, as at 53 to form a portion 54 separated slightly from the portion 5| and substantially parallel therewith which extends toward and nearly to the flange 52. In this case each of the elements has a shaft 6|, looped at its upper end, as at 62 and a shorter shaft 63. The lower ends of the shafts 5| and 63 are interconnected by an integral angular portion 64 which extends laterally from the shafts and fits between the portions 5| and 54 of the base with the shafts projecting through the space between the flange 52 and the adjacent edge of the portion 54.

If it is desired to have the interconnecting portions 64 of the elements intermeshed, the con- 4 struction shown in Fig. 10 may be used. In this case the shafts BI, 62 are placed between the shafts 6 A, 62A as shown.

In Fig. 11 a base 30 is shown, similar to that in Fig. 5. In this case the shafts of the protective elements 10, 10A, 10B, and 10C are thin resilient curved wires, each of which passes through transversely alined and longitudinally spaced holes in the sides 32, 33 of the base. These shafts, as shown, are of different length and diverge from the base at different angles. Together they form a structure upon which birds cannot alight. The longer shaft of each element may be provided with a hooked end, as shown.

A body of solder or cement 29 is shown in Fig.

11 in which the parts of the protective elements between the sides of the base are embedded. Another way of interconnecting the protective elements is shown in Fig. 12 in which the longitudinally continuous base is formed of a strip above the central parts of the protective elements and the parts of the protective elements under the strip 80 are embedded in the body of solder or cement 8|. In this case both ends of the protective elements are shown provided with loops. The materials of which the strip 80 and the body 8| are made, may be varied at will, for example, they may both be made of a plastic material. In fact, plastics may be used to form the parts of the other constructions shown here- It is sometimes desirable to make the shafts l2 and I3 of the protective elements of thin resilient wire and their resiliency may be increased by making loops I23 and |3B in them as shown in Figs. 13 and 14.

Various modifications in construction, mode of operation, method of use of an invention may and do occur to others, especially after benefiting from knowledge of such a disclosure as that herein presented of the principles involved, but the invention itself is not confined to the present showing.

What I claim is:

1. Birdproofing comprising a longitudinal integral base of sheet metal folded to form an inverted trough-like structure having a fiat top provided with two transversely separated 1ongitudinal rows of spaced perforations, inwardly converging, sides depending from the edges of said top and flanges extending outwardly from the lower edges of the sides, combined with a plurality of protective elements, each having a pair of spaced substantially parallel shafts of unequal lengths projecting through said perforations, with loops formed on the upper ends of the longer shafts and an integral connecting tie portion under said top, the connecting portions of adjacent elements lying diagonally across said rows of perforations in opposite directions and across one another to intermesh and to position their corresponding shafts in opposite rows of perforations.

2. Birdproofing comprising a longitudinal continuous base of sheet metal having a fiat top provided with two transversely separated 1ongitudinal rows of spaced perforations, and sides depending from the base of said top, combined with two sets of protective elements, each element having a pair of spaced substantially parallel rigid shafts of unequal lengths projecting through said perforations, and an integral connecting tie portion under said top, the connecting tie portions of one set being shorter than those of the other set, the connecting tie portions of adjacent elements lying diagonally across said rows of perforations in opposite directions to position their corresponding shafts in opposite rows of perforations, the shorter tie forming portions lying alternately over and under a longer tie portion.

3. Birdprooflng comprising a longitudinally continuous base of sheet metal folded to form an inverted trough-like structure having a top provided with two transversely separated rows of perforations, inwardly converging sides depending from the edges of said top and flanges of unequal widths projecting outwardly from the lower edges of the sides with a lip extending downwardly from the outer edge of the wider flange, combined with a plurality of protective elements, each having a pair of substantially parallel shafts projecting through said perforations and an integral connecting tie portion under said top, the connecting tie portions of adjacent elements lying diagonally across one another to intermesh and to position their corresponding shafts in opposite rows of perforations, the wider flange being provided with perforations between the side from which it projects and the lip at its outer edge, for the reception of fastening devices.

JULIUS STANLEY PELES.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the 0 file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2777171 *Jan 19, 1951Jan 15, 1957KaufmannBird and rodent barrier
US2887730 *Nov 26, 1954May 26, 1959Bittner Harry EdwardBird proofing device
US2938243 *Nov 13, 1953May 31, 1960Peles Julius StanleyBirdproofing device
US5167099 *May 24, 1991Dec 1, 1992George NelsonBird-deterring device
US5181338 *Jun 2, 1992Jan 26, 1993Chatten Victor HBird deterrent method and device
US5253444 *Aug 31, 1992Oct 19, 1993Donoho Bruce ABird repellent apparatus for window sills and the like
US6250023 *Oct 19, 1999Jun 26, 2001Bruce A. DonohoPreventive device against nuisance from birds
US6546676 *Dec 29, 2000Apr 15, 2003Bernd WiesenerDeflection device for birds, and for pigeons in particular
US6718701May 7, 2002Apr 13, 2004Bird Barrier America, Inc.Bird deterrent device
US6775950 *Mar 12, 2002Aug 17, 2004Bruce DonohoDouble bend and crush bird deterrent device
US6836992 *Mar 20, 2003Jan 4, 2005Michael D. RainsBird repelling device
US7036278 *Nov 8, 2004May 2, 2006Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Bird deflector devices and methods
US7040058 *Sep 11, 2001May 9, 2006Joseph FinkelsteinAnti-bird roosting device
US7243465 *Apr 1, 2002Jul 17, 2007Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Branched spike bird deterrent
US7596910 *May 24, 1999Oct 6, 2009Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Unitary configured bird repellent apparatus
US7941977Jul 28, 2009May 17, 2011Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Unitary configured bird repellent apparatus
US8191303Oct 20, 2011Jun 5, 2012Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Unitary configured bird repellent apparatus
US8245435Oct 20, 2011Aug 21, 2012Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Unitary configured bird repellent apparatus
US8250814May 16, 2011Aug 28, 2012Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Unitary configured bird repellent apparatus
US8276324Jun 16, 2009Oct 2, 2012Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Branched spike bird deterrent
US8365457May 22, 2012Feb 5, 2013Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Unitary configured bird repellent apparatus
US8443543Oct 15, 2012May 21, 2013Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Unitary configured bird repellent apparatus
US8479457Sep 11, 2012Jul 9, 2013Bird-B-Gone, Inc.Branched spike bird deterrent
DE1059233B *Sep 12, 1957Jun 11, 1959Charles B KaufmannHindernis zur Abwehr von Tieren
EP0300441A1 *Jul 20, 1988Jan 25, 1989Reichholf, JohannBird repellent device for building protection
EP0696666A1 *Jul 15, 1995Feb 14, 1996GEHRING, ManfredVentilating element for roof eaves
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/101
International ClassificationA01M29/32, E04D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D13/004, A01M29/32
European ClassificationA01M29/32, E04D13/00B