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Publication numberUS2475226 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1949
Filing dateFeb 1, 1945
Priority dateFeb 1, 1945
Publication numberUS 2475226 A, US 2475226A, US-A-2475226, US2475226 A, US2475226A
InventorsRobert P Ellis
Original AssigneeRobert P Ellis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magnetic fastener
US 2475226 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. P. ELLIS MAGNETIC FASTENER July 5, 1949.

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 1, 1945 ll Y II l/ I III/I I I I I [I I L lI/III/I 4 s'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIJZ- m un- Il'lllll INVENTOR.

' July 5, 1949.

R. P. ELLIS 2,475,226

MAGNETI G FAS TENER Filed Feb. 1, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Juiy 5, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE MAGNETIC FASTENER Robert P. Ellis, York, Pa. Application February 1, 1945, Serial No. 575,659

This invention relates to magnetic fasteners and one of the principal objects of the invention is to provide certain improvements over my Patent No. 2,387,931.

Another object of the invention is the provi sion of a magnetic fastener in which both fastening elements may be operatively applied to the flexible material forming the closure element, flush with the surface of such flexible material.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a magnetic fastener which has no projecting parts and which has no visible detents, the entire face of each fastener a smooth appearance.

And a still further object of the invention is the provision of a magnetic fastener which will automatically lock itself by magnetic attraction when one part of the fastener is brought into close proximity to the co-operating part.

Other and further objects will appear in the specifications and will be specifically pointed out in the appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawings exemplifying the invention. and in which:

Fig. 1 is a cross sectional view of the two coperating parts of one form of the fastener showing them attached to the margin of a flexible closure, taken on the lines l-l of Figs. 2 and 3.

Fig. 2 is a face view of the receptacle part of the fastener, taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a face view of the plug part of the fastener, taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional view of the two cooperating parts of another form of fastener showing them attached to the margins of a flexible closure.

Fig. 5 is a face view of the receptacle part of the fastener taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a face view of the plug part of the fastener taken on the line 66 of Fig. 4.

Referring to the drawings in which like letters and numerals of reference refer to similar parts throughout the several views, the character Ml denotes the margin of one of two oppositely disposed flexible closure flaps which may be the closing means for such articles as brief cases, shoes, garments, belts, etc., the character M2 denoting the opposite margin. To each opposite margin are attached, as by sewing at 1, co-operatin magnetic fastening elements which register with each other when the margins MI and M2 are brought into overlapping contact, each of these magnetic elements being preferably enclosed in a casing 8 and 9 respectively, these casings fitting into a hole or slot (not shown), cut

into the flexible material of which the margins element presenting 3 Claims. (Cl. 24-201) are composed. These casings 8 and 9 may be constructed of one piece or several parts welded or brazed together as shown. the main requirement being that the operating faces contact each other.

Within casing 8 is secured, as by a press fit, the U-shaped permanent magnet Hi, the pole characteristics being denoted by the letters N and S respectively. The magnetic elements shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 are rectangular in form but it will be apparent that a. Wide variety of configurations may be equally operable. The pole faces N and S are covered by a portion of the thin nonmagnetic casing 8, this casing having two rectangular holes or openings II and I2 separated by the cross piece l3 between the magnet poles N and S as illustrated.

The casing 9 contains the armature l4 naturally composed of magnetic material such as iron, this armature being pivoted by the shaft l 6 which bears into each side of easing 9. This armature M is preferably provided with a projection l1, the face of which is normally flush with the operating face of the casing 9 as illustrated, a small light spring l8 normally holding the armature down into the casing. the spring l8 being secured to the casing 9 by the rivet IS. The casing 9 has a rectangular hole 20, its edges close to the face of the projection il, through which the projection I! of the armaturemay extend beyond the operating face of the casing 9 when magnetically attracted by either the N or S poles of the magnet I 0 as soon as the casings 8 and 9 are brought sufficiently close together as indicated by the dotted lines in Fig. 1. At one relative position of the casings 8 and 9, the armature projection I! will enter hole ll of easing 8 while at a slightly different position, the armature projection ll may be caused to enter hole l2, thus enabling the margins MI and M2 to provide either a tight or loose fit to the article as will be readily understood. When the N pole of the magnet Ill attracts armature projection l1. it does so through hole I l, the tip H of the armature projection progressively getting closer to actual contact with the pole piece N as it is drawn up to its fullest extent as indicated by the dotted lines, where it finally comes into direct contact with the inner part of the N pole, thus presenting maximum magnetic area of flux passage from the pole piece N to the projection I1, and is held in such position against tension of spring Hi. In this position it will be evident that opposing strain On the margins MI and M2 in the direction of arrows 22 and 23 respectively will only tend to hold the projection I1 still tighter mechanically and the magnetic attraction between the N pole of magnet in and the armature projection I! will prevent the disassociation from any light strain that may possibly occur in use in a direction perpendicular to said arrows, such as by the crimping of the flexible material. The S pole of the magnet will act in a similar manner, the sides of both magnetic pole pieces being so curved that the arc of the pivoted armature projection I! will progressively bring it closer to physical contact with either pole piece as it is attracted through either hole II or l2. In order to loosen the armature ll from magnetic contact with the pole piece, all that is necessary is to pass the finger along between the closed margins MI and M2, forcefully separating them in a direction perpendicular to arrows 22 and 23.

In Figs. 4, 5 and 6 is illustrated a magnetic fastener having the same operational features as .the preceding described fastener, with the added feature that, whereas there are openings H and I2 in the face of casing 8, in this herein to be described fastener, the opening is normally closed by a non-magnetic disc 24 which is tension held into the angularly contracting opening in re face of the casing 6A by the helical spring 25 as illustrated, thus presenting an absolutely flush and closed exterior face to casing 8A. 00- operating casing SA has its armature 26 also normally flush with the face of easing 9A by virtue of its annular angular edge 21 being held against the angular edge of the hole in the casing 9A by means of the tension in helical spring 28 against the disc 29 which latter is attached, as by welding, to the under face of armature 26.

When both casings 8A and 9A are brought into close proximity to each other, the magnetic force inherent in permanent magnet 30 will attract iron armature 26 against tension of spring 28, the magnetic lines of force penetrating non-magnetic disc 24 and force this disc closely against the magnet face as shown by the dotted lines and the armature 26 closely against the outer face of disc 24 as also illustrated by dotted lines, the armature 26 entering the opening in the face of casing 8A and being held there. Any stress applied to the margins MI and M2 in the direction of arrows 22 and 23, which corresponds to stress when the article is in use, will therefore simply cause the annular angular projection 21 of the armature 26 to catch into the annular angular opening in the casing 8A as Will be readily understood, thus preventing disassociation of the magnetic elements. The elements may-be separated in the manner previously described. It will be apparent that, instead of using armature 26, a permanent magnet may be substituted in much the same manner as in my Patent No. 2,397,931 previously mentioned herein, this arrangement providing greater magnetic attractive force, if so desired. Whether or not the casings 8 and 9 extend all the way through the margin MI and M2 is irrelevant to the operation of my fastener.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that I have evolved a magnetic fastener hich will automatically lock the two parts of the fastener together mechanically as soon as they are brought into magnetic attractive disiance to each other but which parts may be easily separated by an adept action of the finger in the right direction, a fastener which will have extremely neat appearance as it may be made and used with a flush face and incidentally prevent dirt from entering the otherwise open aper- 4 tures necessary for the magnetic locking mechanism. This magnetic fastener may be used to secure together the margins of any article having flexible flaps or closure elements and such margins will be held in close association with each other owing to the flush relation between the fastener parts and the margins; there being also no protruding projections as exist in such other fasteners as buttons, clasps, buckles, etc., which mar the appearance and limit the usefulness of the article. The use of my fastener on an article will permit quicker and more convenient closing and opening the flaps than any other so far devised, only one hand being required in the operation.

Various changes may be made in the embodiment of the invention hereinabove specifically described without departing from or sacrificing the advantages of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim: I

1. A magnetic fastener comprising two separate cup-shaped casings, means for attaching each of said casings to an oppositely disposed flexible closure flap, means for causing the open end of each of said cup-shaped casings to contact each other when said flexible closure flaps are placed in closed relation, two magnetically attractive members, one of said mutually magnetically attractive members being recessed within one of said cup-shaped casings, and the other magnetically attractive member covering the opening in the other cup-shaped casing, said last named magnetically attractive member being adapted to project beyond its casing into the opening in the other cup-shaped casing in order to insure against lateral movement of the said casings.

2. A magnetic fastener comprising two separate cup-shaped casings, means for attaching each of said casings to an oppositely disposed flexible closure flap, means for causing the open end of each of said cup-shaped casings to contact each other when said flexible closure flaps are placed in closed relation, two mutually magnetically attractive members, the inner sides of one of said cup-shaped casings being inclined to a larger diameter at its base and having one of said magnetically attractive members attached therein in a recessed position, the other cupshaped casing containing the other magnetically attractive member, the outer face of said magnetically attractive member being held flush with the rim of its cup-shaped casing by an inwardly tensioned spring, and an outward flare on the outer edge of said last named magnetically attractive member, said last named magnetically attractive member being adapted to project beyond its casing against the action of said spring into the opening in the other cup-shaped casing through magnetic attraction in order to insure against lateral movement of said casings.

3. A magnetic fastener as in claim 1, the said cup-shaped casing provided with said recessed magnetically attractive member being provided with a non-magnetic closure element within the opening thereof, said closure element being normally held flush with the rim of said cup-shaped casing by a spring within said casing said closure element being capable of being depressed within said casing by the projecting action of the ma netically attractive member in the opposite casing.

ROBERT P. ELLIS.

(References on following page) 6 Name Date Hinchey Sept. 12, 1916 Dubilier July 7, 1942 Boggs May 18, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date France Nov. 7, 1933

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2508305 *Feb 5, 1948May 16, 1950Macy O TeetorMagnetic door catch
US2615227 *Nov 18, 1949Oct 28, 1952Hornik FrederickMagnetic clasp coupling for jewelry
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Classifications
U.S. Classification24/303, 335/303, 292/251.5, 223/109.00A, 292/201, 211/DIG.100
International ClassificationA45C13/10, A43C11/00, A41F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C13/1069, A41F1/002, Y10S211/01, A43B1/0054, A43C11/00
European ClassificationA43B1/00M, A41F1/00B, A43C11/00, A45C13/10M