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Publication numberUS2475741 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 12, 1949
Filing dateJan 6, 1943
Priority dateJan 6, 1943
Publication numberUS 2475741 A, US 2475741A, US-A-2475741, US2475741 A, US2475741A
InventorsGoeller Robert A
Original AssigneeGoeller Robert A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Connector
US 2475741 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

V nl upenn@ op 2.475.741 S QQ'H QN July 12, 1949- R. A. GOELLER 2,475,741

CONNECTOR Filed Jan. 6, 1943 J'J0J4474-046. A

Patented July 12, 1949 SEARCH ROOM UNITED STATES PATENT oFFicE CONNECTOR Robert A. Goeller, Scarsdale, N. Y.

Application January 6, 1943, Serial No. 471,419

3 Claims. 1

This invention relates to a connector for electrical conductors and the like, and more specifically to the type of connector shown in my Patent No. 1,710,416, April 23, 1929. The object of the present invention is to improve the construction of connectors which employ contact and gripping bushings which are compressed by being moved longitudinally into a tapered bore, and more specifically to provide means for decreasinr. the friction, and thereby increasing with the same effort, the conductivity between such bushings and the surfaces of the bore into which they are moved and their grip on the conductor. Another object is to provide improvements ove'.` such a locking ring as that shown in the aforesaid patent, to prevent its removal from the compression nut and to insure its proper position in the assembly. A further object is to provide means for reducing the friction between the locku ing ring and compression nut and between the abutting ends of the contact and gripping bushing and the locking ring.

I will describe my invention in the following specification and will point out its novel features in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation, partly in section. of a connector which is made according to and embodies my invention. In this figure parts of the connector are shown in the relative positions they assume before they are tightened and a conductor is shown inserted therein.

.Figure 2 is a similar view showing the connector tightened onto the conductor.

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the contact and gripping bushing, and

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the locking Img;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 1 illustrating a modified construction.

I0 designates the body of the connector. This has a tubular portion I I of reduced diameter, the inner surface of the bore of which, designated by I2, is conically tapered. This bore terminates in a transverse base I3. The outer surface of this tubular portion is threaded, as at I4, to receive an internally threaded compression nut 2U.

30 is a contact and gripping bushing, the outer surface of which is conically tapered to t the surface I2 of the portion II of the body. The inner surface of this bushing is provided with relatively shallow serrations 3|. At its inner end is a ange 32 which limits the inward travel of the conductor C and prevents it from contacting thc base I3 of the tubular portion of the body. This 2 bushing is constructed with a plurality of angularly spaced longitudinal slots 33, 34 which extend inwardly from its opposite ends so that it is laterally compressible.

The compression nut is internally threaded, as at 2|, and has an inwardly extending ange 22 at its outer end through which is a central opening 23 of larger diameter than that of the conductor C. This opening is tapered conically in the opposite direction from and at a steeper angle than the taper of the surface I2.

III is a locking ring, the inner surface of which is cylindrical and provided with graduated serrations 4I which are farther apart and deeper at the end adjacent the bushing 30 than at the outer end. Its outer surface is tapered to fit the surface 23. This ring is split at 42 and a longitudinal groove 43 is cut in its outer surface opposite the split 42 to make it compressible. The rear surface of the bushing 30 and the inner surface of the ring 40 abut and are normal to the common axis of these parts.

'Ihe outer end of the ring 40 projects through the compression nut 20 and is flared over its end. as shown at 44. This retains the ring in the compression nut and properly positions it therein. It also forms a curved surface which prevents injury to the conductor C when the latter is flexed as shown in Figure 2.

When the parts are in the position in which they are shown in Figure 1, the contact and gripping bushing 30 and the locking ring 40 are expanded. The conductor C is then inserted until its end abuts the flange 32. 'Ihis prevents the conductor coming into contact with the surface I3 of the body so that it is free to move longitudinally with the bushing and locking ring.

The compression nut is then screwed inwardly on the body to move the parts from the position indicated by the line A--A in Fig. 1 to the position indicated by the line B-B in Fig. 2. The lonritudinal movement imparted to the contact and gripping bushing, locking ring and conductor will first compress the bushing 30 onto the conductor because of the smaller degree of the taper of its outer surface. This difference of taper between the surfaces I2 and 22 creates a greater inward pressure component on the bushing than on the locking ring for the same axial thrust. The bushing may be made more exible than the locking ring to insure this initial compression. The engagement of the bushing and ring with the conductor causes the conductor to move inwardly with them.

Continued inward movement of the parts will also compress the locking ring and cause its serrations to engage and grip the conductor. This lcking ring is shorter axially than the gripping bushing and the contracting pressure cn it is concentrated on a small number of serrations.'while the contracting pressure of the contact and gripping bushing is distributed over a much larger area and a larger number of serrations. Eventually the locking ring will contract more than the contact and gripping bushing and it will engage the conductor iirmly locking it into the assembly. Thereafter a pull on the conductor will tend to further tighten the locking ring because of its reverse taper.

The contact and gripping bushing is preferably made of relatively soft metal, such as copper or brass, and the locking ring of a harder metal.

It is to be understood that the opposite end of the connector may be similarly constructed to grip another conductor C or other desired forms of attachment.

The connector shown in Figure is similar' to that shown in the preceding gures, but in this case the tapered surface I2 is within a portion I IA of the same outer dimensions as those of the body IllA. This portion is extended as at HB and has an internally threaded bore I4A. The compression nut A is externally threaded, as at 2IA, to flt the threads I4A. 24 is a cylindrical bore through the compression nut which terminates in a tapered portion 23A. The locking ring 40A has a cylindrical extension 45 which extends through the bore 24 and is flared over the outer end of the nut, as at 44A.

Some of the features herein described are shown in my Patent No. 1,710,416, issued April 23, 1929. In using connectors like those shown in this patent it has been found that there is some tendency to rotate the locking ring 40 with the compression nut 20 and for this rotation to be imparted to the gripping bushing 3D through the abutting surfaces of the ring and the bushing. I have found that this difficulty can be overcome by providing a film of an unlike metal with a low coefficient of friction and high electrical conductivity between the tapered surfaces of the locking ring and the compression nut, as shown at 46. This' can be easily effected by plating the locking ring with silver, for example. I also plate the contact and gripping bushing with a similar metal, as shown at 35, for the purpose of reducing its frictional resistance to longitudinal movement, increasing its gripping effect with the same effort and increasing the electrical conductivity between the bushing and the bolt. A similar nlm is shown at 41 between the adjacent surfaces of the bushing and ring. Such a film also decreases any tendency of corrosion between these parts impairing their conductivity. I have found silver a suitable metal to use for this purpose, not only because of its high conductivity and 10W coeicient of friction, but also because if there is any corrosiony oxide of silver is a good conductor of electricity. Although at present I prefer to use silver, I do not limit myself to this particular metal, in fact I intend no limitations other than those imposed by the following claims.

What I claim is:

1. In a gripping device for the end of a cylindrical member, said device comprising a body having a tapered bore, a compressible contact and gripping bushing having an external surface tapered to fit said bore, said bushing having an internal bore adapted to receive an inserted member, a compression nut threaded on the body and axially movable thereon, said nut having a flange with a tapered inner surface and a lockv ing ring having a tapered outer surface engaging the inner surface of the ange, in which the outer end of the locking ring is flared over thc outer end of the nut and in which the inner surface of the locking ring is provided with grad-, p ated serrations diminishing in size toward said cuter ared end.

2. In a gripping device for the end of a cylinrical member, said device comprising a body having a tapered bore, a compressible contact and gripping bushing having an external surface tapered to t said bore, lsaid bushing having an internal bore adapted to receive an inserted member, a compression nut threaded on the body and axially movable thereon, a flange on the nut having an axial opening with an inner surface tapered in the opposite direction from and at a steeper angle than the bore in the body, and a compressible locking ring having a tapered outer surface engaging the inner surface of the flange, in which the outer end of the locking ring is ared over the outer end of the nut and in which the inner surface of the locking ring is provided with l,graduated serrations diminishing in size toward said outer flared end.

3. In a gripping device for the end of a cylindrical member, -said device comprising a body having a tapered bore, a compressible contact and gripping bushing having an external surface tapered to t said bore, said bushing having an internal bore adapted to receive an inserted member, a compression nut threaded on the body and axially movable thereon, said nut having a flange with a tapered inner surface, a locking ring having a tapered outer surface engaging the inner surface of the ange, in which the outer end of the locking ring is flared over the outer end of the nut, and llmmetal of low frictional coefciency and high electrical conductivity interposed between the external surface of the bushing and the bore in the body to form a surface contact.

ROBERT A. GOELLER.

REFERENCES CITED The following referenlces are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,141,151 Speller June 1, 1915 1,661,448 Taylor Mar. 6, 1928 1,710,416 Goeller Apr. 23, 1929 1,936,469 Hill Nov. 21, 1933 2,009,318 Highfield July 23, 1935 2,249,492 Pennell July 15, 1941 2,333,612 Zimmer Nov. 2, 1943

Patent Citations
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US1141151 *Jun 6, 1914Jun 1, 1915Nat Tube CoPipe-coupling.
US1661448 *Apr 24, 1923Mar 6, 1928Aluminum Co Of AmericaNonseizing article of aluminum and method of producing the same
US1710416 *Apr 16, 1927Apr 23, 1929Goeller Robert AConnecter
US1936469 *Jun 30, 1930Nov 21, 1933Gen ElectricPrimary disconnecting device
US2009318 *Oct 23, 1930Jul 23, 1935Somerville Highfield JohnMethod of joining together or anchoring wire cables and apparatus therefor
US2249492 *Jul 10, 1940Jul 15, 1941Ford PennellLine connector
US2333612 *May 7, 1942Nov 2, 1943Bastian Blessing CoCoupling
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2832598 *Apr 4, 1955Apr 29, 1958Andrew StrubShuffleboard cue
US2930642 *Jul 10, 1957Mar 29, 1960Howlett George HSteel bar connector for reinforcing and stressing concrete
US3801131 *Apr 30, 1973Apr 2, 1974Appleton Electric CoSealed electrical connector for securing conduits to junction boxes
US3870349 *Aug 13, 1973Mar 11, 1975Oetiker HansConnecting device between a pipe stub and a flexible hose surrounding the stub
US4315699 *May 12, 1975Feb 16, 1982Joslyn Mfg. And Supply Co.Multiwedge connector
US4655159 *Sep 27, 1985Apr 7, 1987Raychem Corp.Compression pressure indicator
US5340163 *Dec 22, 1993Aug 23, 1994Societe Nationale D'etude Et De Construction De Moteurs D'aviation (S.N.E.C.M.A.)Safety sealing conduit connector
US6464267 *Oct 19, 1998Oct 15, 2002Plasson Ltd.Pipe coupling
US6929289 *Apr 23, 2003Aug 16, 2005John Guest International Ltd.Tube couplings
US6957833 *Apr 22, 2003Oct 25, 2005John Guest International LimitedTube couplings
US7032932Sep 11, 2003Apr 25, 2006John Guest International LimitedTube couplings
US7100948 *Apr 30, 2003Sep 5, 2006John Guest International LimitedTube couplings
US7410193Apr 11, 2006Aug 12, 2008John Guest International LimitedTube couplings
US7422248Apr 28, 2005Sep 9, 2008John Guest International LimitedCollets for tube couplings
US7425022Feb 2, 2006Sep 16, 2008John Guest International LimitedTube couplings
US8702130 *May 4, 2012Apr 22, 2014Sielc Technologies CorporationFitting with improved tube clamping capability
US20030201642 *Apr 30, 2003Oct 30, 2003John Guest International LimitedTube couplings
US20030201643 *Apr 22, 2003Oct 30, 2003John Guest International LimitedTube couplings
US20040061329 *Sep 11, 2003Apr 1, 2004John Guest International Limited.Tube couplings
US20050264009 *Apr 28, 2005Dec 1, 2005Guest Timothy SCollets for tube couplings
US20060181080 *Apr 11, 2006Aug 17, 2006John Guest International LimitedTube couplings
US20060202478 *Feb 2, 2006Sep 14, 2006John Guest International LimitedTube couplings
US20080290660 *Jul 3, 2005Nov 27, 2008Widee B.V.Coupling Between Two Bodies Comprising an Elastically Deformable Cutting Ring With a Screw Thread Forming Cutting Lips
US20100171302 *Jul 8, 2010Nibco Inc.Push-twist connector
EP0217653A2 *Sep 26, 1986Apr 8, 1987RAYCHEM CORPORATION (a Delaware corporation)Compression pressure indicator
EP0840421A1 *Jul 25, 1997May 6, 1998Oy Sekko AbCable joint box or cable shoe for medium-voltage cables
WO2015027991A1 *Aug 21, 2014Mar 5, 2015Amphenol-Tuchel Electronics GmbhContact element comprising a clamping terminal for a stranded conductor
Classifications
U.S. Classification403/308, 285/342, 285/334.1, 285/324, 285/382.7
International ClassificationH01R4/50, H01R11/11, F16L19/00, F16L19/08, H01R11/28
Cooperative ClassificationH01R4/5025, H01R11/28, F16L19/083
European ClassificationH01R4/50C2, F16L19/08C, H01R11/28