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Publication numberUS2476135 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 12, 1949
Filing dateFeb 4, 1944
Priority dateFeb 4, 1944
Publication numberUS 2476135 A, US 2476135A, US-A-2476135, US2476135 A, US2476135A
InventorsColburn Richard R
Original AssigneeColburn Richard R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Furred concrete building wall
US 2476135 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

4 Sheets-Sheet l R. R. COLBURN FURRED CONCRETE BUILDING WALL INVENTOR.

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July l2, 1949.

Filed Feb. 4, 1944 July 12, i949, R. R, COLBURN 2,476,135

FURRED CONCRETE BUILDING WALL Filed Feb. 4, 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

July 12, w49., R. R. coLBURN 2,475,335

FURRED CONCRETE BUILDING WALL Filed Feb. 4, 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 July 12, 1949. R. R.' OLBURN y 2,476,135

FURRED CONCRETE BUILDING WALL Filed Feb. 4I 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented July 12, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Claims.

This invention relates in general to improvements in the building art, and relates more especially to various improvements in the construction of buildings formed primarily of structural and metallic materials and of concrete or the like.

A general object of my present invention is to provide a new and practical system of construct- `ing durable, compact and attractive buildings, in

an expeditious manner and at low cost.

While wood has heretofore been the principal material used in the construction of dwellings and many other buildings of various types, good lumber is becoming increasingly scarce and more costly to procure, so that the future building industry faces a serious problem in connection with the possible availability of wood for building purposes. The metal working industries have however been greatly expanded in recent years s0 that new markets for metal products will undoubtedly be sought in the future, and concrete ingredients including cement, have always been relatively available in unlimited quantities. It is therefore a foregone conclusion that the building industry of the future will be obligated to utilize such materials as steel and concrete, in order to replace the wooden structures of the past as far as possible, and the use of these substitute materials will result in more durable and stronger buildings. While some smaller buildings have heretofore been formed of concrete blocks and of concrete cast in forms about metallic re-enforcement, these prior concrete structures have been relatively bulky and expensive to utilize in dwellings and the like; and it has heretfore also been difficult to provide most eiective ventilation of the external walls and sufficiently thin but durable inner walls in the previous concrete building assemblages.

It is therefore a more specific object of the present invention to provide an improved combined concrete and metal building construction which is exceedingly flexible in its adaptations, and which is especially useful as a substitute for wooden assemblages in the construction of relatively low-priced dwellings and other buildings.

Another specific object of this invention is to provide a durable and effectively ventilated and heat insulated Wall assemblage formed primarily of inexpensive prefabricated metal plates and fittings concealed within concrete, and which may be quickly and effectively constructed to meet various requirements with the aid of ordinary laborers.

A further specic object of my invention is to provide a composite metal and concrete structure which is relatively permanent and reproof, as compared to prior wooden structures for similar purposes, and which may be expeditiously utilized in the formation of the external and internal Walls, fioors, ceilings, roofs, and other parts of various types of buildings Still another specific object of the invention is to provide a compact and thorougly re-enforced concrete building construction especially useful in the formation of Weather exposed walls, and which is moisture-resistant and well insulated against heat transmission, besides being exceedingly strong.

These and other objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from the following detailed description.

A clear conception of the improved features involved in the present invention, and of the mode of constructing Various parts of buildings embodying the improvements, may be had by referring to the drawings accompanying and forming a part of this specification wherein like reference characters designate the same or similar parts in the numerous views.

Fig. 1 is a horizontal transverse section through a diagrammatic fragment of a typical outer and inner wall assemblage embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a similar section through a diagrammatic fragment of an irregular outside wall embodying my improved inner and outer corner constructions;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged transverse section through one of the straight Wallstud or -re-enforced uprights of the improved concrete outer Wall aS- semblage;

Fig. 4 is a similarly enlarged transverse section through one ofthe inner or internal corners of the wall;

Fig. 5 is a likewise enlarged transverse section through one of the outer or external corners of the wall;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of one of the perforated metallic partition re-enforcing pans;

Fig. '7 is a diagrammatic transverse section through the pan of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a perspective View of one of the metallic outer Wall re-enforcing pans adapted to span the studs or re-enforced uprights;

Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic transverse section through the pan of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a perspective View of a fragment of one of the stud or upright re-enforcing and furring channels;

Fig. 11 is a somewhat diagrammatic vertical the box channels 42, and both the inner and outer wire mesh 28, 31 may be bent at the corners as shown. This external corner assemblage also provides a durable re-enforced corner, and outer rods 24 may also be applied to the clamping elements 2| nearest the outer corners, as indicated in solid lines in Figs. 2 and 5.

The improved internal partitions of my reenforced concrete building assemblage may be formed as specifically shown in Figs. 1, 6 and 1, and each of the partitions comprises a series of relatively rigid multiple plates or perforated pans 43 each having two or more laterally spaced parallel fiat portions 44 of rather extensive area connected to each other by a sloping intermediate portion 45, and also having opposite side edge flanges 46 adapted to overlap the side flanges of the adjacent pans 43; angle irons 41 for connecting the edge iianges 46 with the flat portions 44 of the pans 43 of crossing or intersecting partitions; bolt and nut assemblages 48 for attaching the angle irons 41 to the perforations 49 of adjacent pans 43; and a layer of concrete 50 impacted against the opposite sides of the assembled plates or pans 43 and against the angle irons 41 and merging with the plaster or concrete layer 25 of the adjacent outer walls.

' The pans 43 may each be formed of a single sheet lof metal with the aid of punches and dies, and

the perforations 49 are preferably disposed in straight rows and serve the dual purpose of providing attaching zones for the angle irons 41 and of uniting the concrete `50 on the opposite sides oi' the pans 43. Each pan 43 may also be provided with opposite upper and lower edge flanges 5I as shown in Fig. 6 for effecting attachment of the pans to other structure.

The formation of the sheet metal pans I5, 43, and of the angle irons 4E), 41, channels 20, 42, and clampingV elements 2l, 38, 39 is such that these parts may be quickly and conveniently assembled in diverse combinations and length so as to provide re-enforcing elements for various ceiling heights, for window and door openings of different sizes, and for the floors and ceilings as well as for the walls. The pans, clamping elements, and other sheet metal parts may also be readily bent to different shapes in the field, so as to facilitate the application of various types of ceilings, roofs and overhead coverings to the assembled walls and partitions as shown in Figs. 11 -to '"-which the insulation plates I8 coact. The outer concrete layer 21 may rest directly upon the foundation 52, and the inner plaster or concrete vlayers 25 of the outer walls as well as the concrete 5D of the partitions may be caused to merge directly with the floors 55. This type ofk assemblage will obviously provide a sturdy and moisture-resistant support for the outer walls and inner partitions of the building, and the lceilings jand upperroom floors may obviously be constructed in the same general manner'as the outer vsitioned around the projecting portions of the pans I5 and concrete 21 may then be impacted against the pan and a temporary form plate 51 positioned as shown. One or more layers of roofing paper 5B may be finally applied to the top of the roof to completethe same, thus producing a sturdy waterproof overhung roof assemblage.

As specifically shown in Fig. 12, the banded type of cornice and flat roof shown therein is formed without extending the upper horizontal pans I5 beyond the lower vertical pans I5 of the outer walls, but the outer flanges I1 of the upper pans are rigidly connected to the upper flanges of the side wall pans by means of clamping elements 2| disposed at right angles to each other and coacting with angle irons 41. The re-enforcing bars of the horizontal element 2I are disposed horizontally beneath the angle iron 41 and the re-enforcing bars carried by the upper clamping element 2I are disposed above theangle iron 41, and a concrete projection 59 may be formed adjacent to these horizontal re-enforcing bars to thereby complete the cornice. As in the case of Fig. 11, the top of the roof is also provided with suitable roofing paper 58 or the like, thus providing a simple and neat appearing cornice type of flat roof structure.

As specically depicted in Fig. 13, the parapet type of cornice and fiat roof construction shown therein, is formed in a manner similar to that of Fig. 12, but the parapet extension may be produced by applying additional metallic pans I5 to the outer anges I1 of the horizontal pans I5 which form the roof. The upper anges I1 of these additional pans may be provided with angle irons 41 and clamping elements 2| carrying horizontal re-enforcing bars as shown, and the wire mesh 28 is carried upwardly around these additional pans I5 and concrete may be applied as Ishown to produce the parapet. The roofing paper 58 of this modified assemblage may have its edges 60 embedded within the parapet as inn dcated, and this modication obviously provides a sturdy and attractive parapet type of roof which may also be provided with a cornice 59 similar to that of Fig. 12.

Referring specifically to Fig. 14, the sloping fiat pitch roof construction illustrated therein, may again be formed by utilizing pans I5 and angle irons 41, together with distorted angle irons 6I, and bent clamping elements 38 in order to secure the desired pitch of the roof. In this modication the roof pans I5 coact with the distorted angle irons 6I and project outwardly and downwardly beyond the `outer wall. Angle irons 41 and ordinary clamping elements 2I are applied to the outermost flanges I1 of the sloping pans I5, and the re-enforcing wire mesh and the rods carried by the elements 2I may be embedded in concrete 21 as shown. The concrete roof thus formed may be provided with suitable shingles 52 to produce an attractive and sturdy sloping roof structure.

From the foregoing detailed description of the various features of the present invention, it will antenas 7 be-V apparentthat.; a sturdy -and'f durable building maybe q-ui'clclyV produced with the aid. of the improved reenforcing members andr` clamping elements of the.` present" improvedv construction. After the; structure-li elementsof the walls, partition androof'have-been properly assembled, the concrete`V 2.1* iszpreierably impactedthereagainst withV a cement gun so as to thoroughly embed and conceal the reeenforcing rods 23, 24 and the wire mesh- 25; 2T', andthe double air spaces I9, 26 cooperate with-the insulation boards I8 to provide perfect insulation and toprevent moisture from passing :through the walls. 'Ihe improved building construction can be produced with the` aid ofl connrnornl'abo'rand Without necessity of utilizing skilled labor, and various designs and types of buildingsy caniobviou'slybe produced with the presentinvention. The sheet metal re-enforcing pans may beformed in various. sizesl preferably corresponding in'width tothe standard distances;

between ordinarystudding used in wooden buildings, and these'pans`V may be constructed with the aid of punches and dies,v while. the angle irons may be formed' of standard angle stock; The

clampingelements:maybe'forniedV of steel, andy ordinary steel rodsfand standard wire mesh may be utilized for rei-enforcing-purposes, so that the improve@ buildings-f.4 maybe assembled and produced at moderate. cost and inA a. durable manner.

ItV is especially noteworthy, that when the sheet-metalpans are set npvertically, the sloping side` edgesprovide stud?v depressions into which concrete may be shot-to provide re-enforced colunins which are integral' with the intervening wall portions; andiwhen 'the pans are disposed horizontally they likewisev provide re-enforced joists formed integral with the remaining adja-` cent portions oli the floors or ceilings with which theyicooperate. The sloping'end portions of the pans:r also.y coopratif," with the transverse end flanges thereoii tot provide ive-enforced concrete window and door'sill's, headers; and lintles; and the sloping topsof all of the vadjoining wall pans also provide strong re-enlforced Aconcrete plates. The improved" pan r formations 'therefore provide a concrete wall''whicl-i-t i'samplyl re-enforced by vertical andi horizontal integral 11e-enforced beams inail of which reenf`orcing rods may lbe construction orto-fthe precise mode-of use, herein shown' and' described; for various modications within the scope ottheappended claims may occurI topersons skilledinthe Y art.

I claim:

l. A building'wallcomprising, a series of unitary rigid pans each-having a'n` outer planel area andl integrallrelatively wide opposite side flanges olif-set inwardly with respect tothe intervening.v

plane area, theI outer .areas4 of" adjacent pans lying in a common plane and` the inner flanges of adjacent pans overlapping, insulation board coactingexternally wiithfthefrsuccessive sets of said overlapping flanges4` and 'being spaced'. fromssaid.

The

.s 'outer'pa'n areas. to provide air spaces between the pans vand the outer surface` of` said-5 board-.1a furring'eha-nnel having a weby coacting with@ the internal surface or said board` adjacent to each set of said pan flanges andi also having., at least one integral flange extending inwardly` away from said webv and board, fastening elements uniting each set of said overlapped pan flanges with the adjacent channel web to clamp their-,1'- tervening board in place, a sheet o f-v plaster suspended from the inner free edgesofsaid channel flanges and being spacedv from rsaid board"` to provide other air spaces adjoining the inner surface ofv saidboard between successive'channels. reeniorcing rods carried by said fastening elements outwardly of said common.v plane, andsa layer of concrete enacting with. said pan areas and having said rodsenrbedded. therein.

-2. A building wall comprising, a. seriesof unltary sheet metal' pans each having an outer piane area and; integral relatively wide opposite side flanges off-set inwardly with respect. tothe intervening plane area, the outer areas of'adjacent pans lying ina common planeand the, inner flanges oi. adjacentr pansoverlapping, insulation board coacting externally with. the successivesets ci said overlappinganges and being spaced. .from said outer pan areas to provide air spaces. between pans and. the outer surface of .said board, a @shaped rurring. .channel havinga web .coacting with the internal. surface of. said .board adljacent to each set of said overlapped pan .anges and also having integral flanges extending inwardly away from. the opposite sides of said. web

and. from said board fasteningelements. uniting each set of said overlapped pan. ilanges with the adjacent channel webto clamp the intervening board in place,l a sheet of plaster. suspendedfrom the inner free edges. of said channel flanges.y and being spaced from saidboard to *provideother, air spaces adjoining, the inner surfaceof said board between successive channels, reenfolcing rods carried by said fastening elements outwardly of said common planeand a layer of concrete coacting with said pan areas and having said rods embedded therein. l

3. A building wall comprising, av series of unitary rigid pans each having an outer plane area and integral relatively wide opposite side flanges oft-set inwardly with respect to the intervening plane area, the outer areas of adjacent pans lying in a common plane and the inner flanges' of adjacent pans overlapping, insulation'board coacting externally with the successive sets of'said 'overlapping flanges and ybeing spaced from said v outer pan areas to provide air spaces between the pans and the outer surface of said board, af'furring channel having a web coacting with the'inner surface of said board adjacent toeach; set of said pan flanges and' also having at leastone integral ii'ange extending inwardly away from said web and board, fastening elements uniting each set of saidl overlapped pan flanges with the adjacent channel web to clampv the intervening board in place, a sheetl of plaster suspended from the inner free edgesof said channel flanges and being spaced from said board to `provide-*other air spaces adjoining the inner surface of said board between successivechannels, reenforcing rods carried by said fastening elements inwardly and outwardly of the plane'v areasV of' said" pans adjacent to eachl set of said? overlapped flanges, 'and ay layer of concrete coacting with saidpan areas and having said rods andi portions' of-v'said fastening elements. embedded therein. I

4. A building wall comprising, a series of unitary sheet metal pans each having an outer plane area and integral relatively wide opposite side flanges off-set inwardly with respect to the intervening plane area and connected thereto by inclined intervening portions, the outer areas of adjacent pans lying in a common plane and the inner flanges of adjacent pans overlapping and coacting with said inclined portions to form outwardly open grooves, insulation board coacting externally with the successive sets of said overlapping flanges and being spaced from said outer pan areas to provide air spaces between the pans and the outer surface of said board, a fur-ring channel having a web coacting with the inner surface of said board adjacent to each set of said pan flanges and also having at least one integral iiange extending inwardly away from said web and board, fastening elements uniting each set of said overlapped pan anges with the adjacent channel web to clamp the intervening board in place, a sheet of plaster suspended from the inner free edges of said channel flanges and being spaced from said board to provide other air spaces adjoining the inner surface of said board between successive channels, reenforcing rods ycarried by said fastening elements within and outwardly beyond each of said grooves, and a layer of concrete coacting with said pan areas and having said rods embedded therein.

5. A building wall comprising, a series of unitary rigid pans each having an outer plane area and integral relatively wide opposite side flanges off-set by inclined portions inwardly with respect to the intervening plane area, the outer areas of adjacent pans lying in a common plane and the inner flanges of adjacent pans overlapping and coacting with said inclined portions to form outwardly open grooves, insulation board coacting externally with the successive sets of said overlapping flanges and being spaced from said outer pan areas to provide air spaces between the pans l0 and the outer surface of said board, a furring channel having a web coacting with the inner surface of said board adjacent to each set of said pan flanges and also having integral flanges eX- tending inwardly away from said web and board, fastening elements uniting each set of said overlapped pan flanges with the adjacent channel web to clamp the intervening board in place, a sheet of plaster suspended from the inner free edges of said channel flanges and being spaced from said board to provide other air spaces adjoining the inner surface of said board between successive channels, reenforcing rods carried by said fastening elements within and outwardly beyond each of said grooves, a sheet of foraminous material secured to the outermost rods, and a layer of concrete coacting with said pan areas and having said rods and foraminous material embedded therein.

RICHARD R. COLBURN.

REFERENCES CITED The following referenlces are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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US873739 *May 18, 1907Dec 17, 1907Robert EdmondsonReinforced interlocking concrete wall.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2642645 *Sep 13, 1948Jun 23, 1953Charles A CommetForm for concrete constructions
US2902854 *Mar 12, 1956Sep 8, 1959Tecfab IncPrefabricated roof or ceiling panel
US2964821 *Jul 5, 1956Dec 20, 1960Donald E MeehanApparatus for constructing building walls
US3455074 *Aug 23, 1967Jul 15, 1969Ladenburg Thalmann & CoBuilding structure and means and method of its manufacture
US4052829 *Mar 17, 1976Oct 11, 1977Chapman Ward WSemi-prefabricated monolithic steel-reinforced cement building construction
US4498262 *Apr 6, 1981Feb 12, 1985Enrique Garcia AssociatesSolar shield assembly
US6119417 *Jun 9, 1997Sep 19, 2000Concrete Roof Systems, IncSloped concrete roof systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/347, 52/274, 52/351, 52/91.2, 52/649.7
International ClassificationE04B1/30, E04B1/41
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/30, E04B1/41
European ClassificationE04B1/30, E04B1/41