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Publication numberUS2476623 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 19, 1949
Filing dateMay 7, 1948
Priority dateMay 7, 1948
Publication numberUS 2476623 A, US 2476623A, US-A-2476623, US2476623 A, US2476623A
InventorsPetersen Nels H
Original AssigneeAddison Semmes Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Material packaging
US 2476623 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 19, 1949.

Filed lay 7, 1948 N. H. PETERSEN 2,476,623

IATERIAL PACKAGING 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 I M"ITHIHHIL fi ""Hmilw Patented July 19, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE MATERIAL PACKAGING Nels B. Petersen, Racine, Wis., assigner to Addison-Semmes Corporation,

poration of Wisconsin Application May 7, 1948, Serial No. 25,749

14 Claims. (VCI. 20G-62) 'I'his invention relates to the packaging of materials, -and has todo with a package for handling and shipping articles, particularly articles which are fragile or frangible in character.

The breakage in handling and shipping articles composed in substantial part of glass or other frangible or fragile material, under present conditions of packaging such articles, 'is quite high and the freight rate in shipping such articles is also high. The present practice in packaging articles formed to substantial extent of glass, such as window units, for example,is to place the article within a frame formed of lumber, with a thick filling of straw or similar material at opposite sides of the article, the sides of the frame being then closed by woodenA slats r v boards nailed to the frame; the whole constituting a crate of substantial weight. This method of packing the article for shipment is time consuming and the packaged article is excessively heavy, rendering it diicult to handle, particularly if the article itself is of substantial weight, with the attendant risk of breakage of the article in shipment, or in handling, due to falling or dropping ofthe crate with the article therein. A further objection to the present method of packaging above referred to is that the packaged or crated article is excessively heavy, as above noted, and a substantial portion of the freight charge is'paid for the crate and the packaging or cushioning material therein rather than onthe article itself. The time required to package the article and the weight of the packaged or crated article are important considerations in respect to the cost of shipping the crated article and the likelihood of breakage, as will be clear.

My invention is directed to means whereby the above noted objections to the present practice are substantially reduced. More particularly, I provide means whereby the packaging of articles is materially expedited, thereby effecting asubstantial saving in time, risk of breakage of the packaged article is greatly reduced, and the weight of the packaged article is materially less than under the present practice above referred to, thereby facilitating handling of the'packaged article, reducing likelihood of breakage due to falling or dropping of the packaged article and effecting a substantial saving in freight charges Racine, Wis., a cor- Figure 1 is a side view of a package embodying my invention;

Figure 2 is an end viewof the package of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially online 3-3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is an inner face view, on a reduced scale, of one. of the pallets; j

Figure 5 is a fragmentary inner face view, on an enlarged scale, of one of the pallets and of one of the spacer blocks thereof, showing in more detail the construction of the block;

Figure 6 is a view like Figure 1, but showing a modified form of package embodying my invention;

Figure 7 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially payable for shipment of the packaged article.

Further objects and advantages of my invention will appear from the detail description.

In the drawings:

on line l-l of Figure 6; and

Figure 8 is a side view, on a reduced scale, of the modified form of pallet used in Figures 6 and '1.

Window units comprising two panes of glass, spaced apart with a dead air space between them, have come into rather extensive use. Such units, assembled at the factory, are shipped, after being packaged in the manner above described, to distributors or consumers. The package of my invention is particularly suitable for shipping win- Idow units of the character referred to and will be described as used f or that purpose, by way of example, it being understood, however, that the package of my invention may be used for shipping various articlesy which, due to their fragile or franglble character require care in packing, and shipping.

In Figures 1 to 5, inclusive, I have shown a package embodying my invention as used for handling and shipping an article I0, the particular article shown being a window unit of known construction comprising two panes of glass II lsuitably secured together with a spacer I2 between them, to provide a dead air space I3 between the panes II. A thin metal frame Il, formed of aluminum, or any suitable metal, extends about the marginal portions vof the panes II and the outer face of spacer I2, the parts being secured together by a suitable adhesive, as is known.

The unit I0, which is of rectangular shape in side view, is disposed within an open sided recin Figure 1. The article I0 fits snugly within frame I5 and preferably is positioned midway between the open sides thereof.

Two pallets I8 are disposed within frame I5, at opposite sides of the article II'I. The pallets I8 are similar to the pallet of Patent No. 2,432,- 295, for Pallet, issued December 9, 1947, to William T. Donahue. .Each of the pallets I8 comprises an outer deck I9 formed of. two ply or double walled corrugated fiber board, paper board, or like material. Various materials, such as cardboard, paper board, chipboard and the like, classified generally as paper stock, and strawboard, which is analogous to but is not paper stock, may be used in the .pallet I8. For convenience of description, I shall refer to the pallet as being formed of paper stock, that term being used in its generic sense and being inclusive of the various materials above mentioned and of equivalent materials. Accordingly, the term paper stock, as used both ixi the specification and the claims, is to be interpreted generically as has been'indlcated.

The pallet deck I9 has secured thereto, by means of a suitable adhesive, spacer members or blocks 2li preferably arranged in parallel rows. spaced apart transversely of deck I9, as shown in Figure 4. The respective blocks 20, preferably-are each formed of a strip of corrugated paper stock, such as paper board or cardboard, wound spirally or convolutely into the form of an open cylinder, having a central opening of substantial extent, the convolutions of the block being' adhesively secured together. The base I9 of pallet I8 substantially conforms to the interior of frame I5 and is effective as a closure for one side thereof. The blocks 20 are oi' such length. that. when the pallet I8 is properly positioned within frame I5, their inner ends are in abutting relation to the corresponding side of the article I0. By abutting relation, I mean that the inner ends of the blocks 20 are disposed in close proximity to article I8, effective for restraining the latter against obiectionable movementI relative to frame I5 and toward the pallet I8.

Two pallets I8 are positioned within frame I5. at opposite sides of article I0. as shown in Figure 3. Preferably, a sheet or paper 22, or any suitable material, is disposed at each side of article III. between the latter and the blocks 20 of the pallets, to protect the article against possible rubbing and scratching by the blocks 20, in the event that the inner end portions of the blocks should be coated or impregnated. to some extent, with the adhesive for securing the blocks to the baseof the pallet, as may occur in some cases. When the article I and the pallets I8 are properly positioned within frame I5, the outer faces of the outer bases I9 of the pallets I8 are substantially flush with the side faces or surfaces of the frame I5. With theparts oi.' the package properly assembled as above, the pallets I8 are restrained against movement outward'of frame I5 by any suitable known means: preferably. by means of metal strapping secured about the frame I in a known manner, providing retaining'steel bands 23 spaced a substantial distance apart, as shown in Figures 1 and 2. The bands 23 are applied under considerable tension and press into the wood of frame I5. particularly at the edges thereof, being thereby secured to the frame and anchored against relative movement. The outer bases I9 of the pallets I8 possess considerable resiliency. while being possessed also of substantial rigidity, and are capable of yielding outward under pressure, thereby cushioning the article Iii and guarding against breakage thereof. Also, the corrugations of base I9 of the respective pallets- I8 c'an be collapsed, inthe event of excessive outward pressure being exerted thereon, such as might otherwise cause breakage of the article II), thus providing cushioning means further guarding against breakage of article III. Though the bands 23 are under substantial tension, the portions thereof extending across the frame I5 in overlying relation to the outer bases I9 of the pallets I8 are of' substantial length and may be exed outward of frame I5 under pressure. Accordingly, any outward movement of either of the pallets I8, relative to frame I5, is yieldingly restrained by the retaining bands 23 which, due to their inherent resiliency, serve as springs for cushioning such movement of the pallets. I thustake advantage of the inherent resiliency of the metal strapping or steel bands 23 for cushioning movement of the article vIII and the pallets I8 relative to frame I5, due to impact or other causes, thereby further reducing risk of breakage of the article III.

The article I0 may be packaged with expedition and facility simply by laying the frame I5 on one side, upon a iiat surface, inserting a' pallet within the frame, then placing the article III within the frame, with the protective Sheet 22 interposed between article III and the blocks 20 of the pallet. after which the other protective sheet 22 may be placed upon the article and the other pallet I8 placed within frame I5, the assembly being 'quickly secured together by means of the metal strapping 23. The frame I5, together with the parts therein, including the article I0 and the pallets I8, constitutes a complete package suitable for handling and shipment. This package eil'ectively guards the article against breakage or damage. as above pointed out. In`

addition, the weight of the completed package is substantially less than the weight of a. similar article packaged in accordance with the present practice above briefly described. For example, a window unit similar to article III, measuring 66" x 96" and packaged or crated in-accordance with the present practice above referred to, had a gross weight of 745 pounds- The same unit packaged in accordance with my invention had a'gross weight of approximately 450 pounds. Test shipments have shown that units packaged in accordance with my invention are as effectively guarded against breakage or damage as units.

packaged or crated in accordance with the present practice and, in fact, indications are that packaging articles in accordance with my lnvention will effect a material saving in breakage. The substantial saving in weight, above referred to, is important since it eilects a corresponding saving in shipping charges. Further, substantial reduction In weight of the packaged article renders it more easily handled and further reduces risk of breakage. A further advantage of packaging articles in accordance with my'invention is that the time required for packaging is materially reduced compared with the present practice, thereby effecting a further substantial saving in cost.

In the modiiled form of'package shown in Figures 6 and "I, the article IIla comprises the glass panes IIa secured together in spaced relation by a suitable adhesive material I2a which also serves as a spacer, the dead air space I 3a between the panes IIa being of somewhat less thickness than the dead air space I8 shown in marginal metal frame.

Figure 3. The unit I a is not 'provided with any In order to protect the edge portions of unit I3a, I provide a liner 24 fitting within the frame I5. The liner 2l is formed of double walled or two ply corrugated paper stock, such as cardboard, or paper board. or analogous material. Liner 2l is of channel cross section with its side flanges 25 disposed in lapping relation to the outer bases I9 of the pallets I8a, preferably seating on the outer faces or the bases I9. The channel liner 24 provides cushioning means protecting the edge portions of the unit Illa, and the flanges 25 of liner 2l provide cushion elements supplementing the pallet bases I9 and affording additional protection to the packaged article. When the steel strapping or bands 23 are drawn tightly about the frame I5, the corresponding areas of the flanges 25 of the liner 24 are crushed or flattened so that the bands 23 are eiiective for restraining the pallets 18a against outward movement relative to frame I5, as before.

Each of the pallets I8a is provided with an inner base 21, of single ply or single wall corrugated paper stock, corresponding to the outer base I9, the spacer blocks 2li being adheslvely secured to inner base 21 as Well as outer base I9. When using` the two deck or base pallets I8a, the inner bases 21 thereof serve as protective sheets for the `sides of the article Illa, and the protective sheets 22 shown in Figure 3 may be omitted. The package of Figure 8 is otherwise the same as the package of Figure 3 and need not be described in further detail, it being noted, however. that the inner bases 21 of the pallets I8a provide additional cushioning means for the article Ill, further guarding against breakage or damage thereof. The articles I0 and Illa may be packaged in substantially either of the two ways shown and described by way of example, as will be understood. While I have shown the pallet decks as being of two ply or double wall construction, that is not essential and, within the broader aspects of my invention, the bases of the pallets may be of any suitable construction, Also, while the spacer blocks preferably are formed of paper stock and are of. hollow cylindrical construction, any suitable blocks may be used within the broader aspects of my invention. In certain cases, where the article to be packaged is unusually fragile, the spacer blocks of the pallets may be formed of chipboard or oi strawboard, which is somewhat softer than cardboard or like paper stock, to provide further cushioning of the packaged article.

The pallets I8 and I8a are, for convenience, made of a standard size, the bases of the respective pallets being 60 by 72". These pallets may readily be cut, conveniently by a band saw, to desired size. In some cases, when cutting the pallet certain of the spacer blocks or poststhereof may be cut in two. That is not objectionable and the remaining portions of the cut blocks retain their efliciency as spacing and cushioning elements. When packaging large articles two or more pallets, one cut to proper size, if required, may be placed at each side of the packaged article, as will be understood. In such cases spaced cross strips may be secured to the sides of the frame, for bracing purposes and to prevent bowing inward of the sides of the frame when the, steel strapping is applied. Such bracing strips are known and need not be illustrated nor further described The cross strips, when used, cooperate with the steel strapping to restrain the pallets constitute, in eii'ect, a single pallet.

-to be construed as inclining either unitary pallets or pallets formed of two or more sections togetherconstituting a pallet.

As above indicated, and Y by those skilled in this art. changes in details may be resorted to without departing from the field and scope oi' my invention, and I intend to include all such variations, as fall within the scope of the appended claims, in this application in which the' preferred forms tion have'been disclosed.

I claim:

1. In a package for handling and shipping ar- Y an article within tcles, an open sided frame, said frame, and pallets secured within said frame at opposite sides of said article each comprising an outer base substantially conforming to the interior of and closing the side of said frame and spacer members extending from said outer base inward in abutting relationto said article restraining the latter against movement relative to said frame toward either side thereof.

2. In a package for handling and shipping articles, `an open sided frame, an article within said frame, means closing said frame at one side thereof and abutting the adjacent side of said article providing cushioning means restraining said article against movement relative to said frame toward said one side thereof, and a pallet secured in said frame comprising an oute'r base substantially conforming to the interior of and closing the other side of said frame and spacer members extending from said outer base inward in abutting relation to said article restraining the latter against movement relative to said frame toward said other =Lde thereof.

3. In a package for handling and shipping articles, an open sided frame, an article within said frame, pallets within said frame at opposite sides of said article each comprising an outer base substantially conforming to the interior of and closing the side of said frame and spacer members extending from said outer base inward in abutting relation to said article restraining the latter against movement relative to said frame toward either side thereof, and spaced resilient retaining members secured to said frame extending across the sides thereof in overlying relation to the outer bases of said pallets restraining the latter against outward frame.

4. In a package for handling and shipping articles, an open sided frame, an article within said frame, pallets Within said frame at opposite sides of said article each comprising an outer base movement relative to said substantially conforming to the interior of and closing the side of said frame and spacer blocks `extending from said outer base inward in abutting relation to said article, the outer base of the respective pallets being resilient while possessing substantial rigidity, and spaced retaining members secured to said frame extending across the sides thereof outer bases of said pallets 16 ,5. In a package for handling and shipping arpallets, as and for A as will be understood only of my invenin overlying relation to the 'I ticles, an o pen sided frame, an article within said frame, pallets within said frame at opposite sides of said article each comprising an outer base substantially conforming to the interior of and closing the side of said frame and spacer blocks extending from said cuter base inward in abutting relation to said article, the outer base of the respective pallets being yieldable and resilient while ing the side of said frame and spacer blocks secured to said base extending therefrom inward in abutting relation to said article, the outer base of the respective pallets being resilient while possessing substantial rigidity, and spaced retaining `members secured to said frame extending across the sides thereof in overlying relatlonto the outer bases of said pallets.

'7. In a package for handling and shipping articles, an open sidedframe, an article within said frame, pallets within said frame at opposite sides of said article each comprising an outer base sub-- stantially conforming to the interior of and closing the side of saidvframe and `spacer blocks extending from said outer base inward in abutting relation to said article, the outer base of the respective pallets being formed of paper stock like -material, and spaced retaining bands secured to said frame extending thereabout in overlying relation to the outer bases of said pallets.

8. In a package for handling and shipping articles, an open sided frame, an article within said frame, pallets within said frame at opposite sides of said article each comprising an outer base substantially conforming to the interior of and closing the side of said frame and Spacer blocks extending from said outer base inward in abutting relation to said article, the outer base ofthe respective pallets being formed of paper stock like material and said blocks being .formed of paper stock like material and adhesively secured to said outer base, and spaced retaining bands secured to said frame extending thereabout in overlying relation to the outer bases of said pallets.

9. In' a package for handling and shipping articles, an open sided frame. an article within said frame, pallets within said frame at opposite sides of said article each comprising an outer base sul stantially conforming .to the interior of and clos-l ing the side of said frame and spacer blocks extending from said outer base inward in abutting relation to said article, the outer base of the respective pallets being formed of corrugated paper stock like material, and spaced retaining bands secured to said frame extending thereabout in overlying relation to the outer bases of said pallets.

10. In a package for handling and shipping articles, an open sided frame, an article within said frame, pallets within said frame at opposite sides of said article each comprising an outer base substantially conforming to the interior of and closing theside of said frame and spacer blocks extending from' said outer base inward in abutting relation to said article. the outer base of the respective pallets being formed of corrugated paper stock like material and said blocks being formed of corrugated paper stock like material and adhesively secured to said outer base. and spaced retaining bands secured to said frame extending thereabout in overlying relation to'the vouter bases of said pallets.

1l. In a package for handling and shipping articles, an open sided frame, an article within said frame, pallets within said frame at opposite sides of said article each comprising an outer base substantially conforming tothe interior of and closing the side of said frame and spacer blocks secured to said outer base extending therefrom inward in abutting relation to said article. protective sheets of material between the inner ends of the blocks of the pallets and said article, the outer base of the respective pallets being formed of corrugated paper stock, and'spaced .retaining bands secured to said trame extending thereabout in overlying relation to the outer bases of said pallets.

12. In a package for handling and shipping articles, an open sided frame, an article within said frame, pallets within said frame at opposite sides of said article each comprising an outer base substantially conforming to the interior of and closing the Side of said frame and an inner base and spacer blocks ,secured between said bases disposing saidinner baseV in abutting relation to said article, the bases of the respective pallets being formed of corrugated paper stock, and spaced retaining bands secured to said frame extending thereabout in overlying relation to the outer bases of said pallets.

13. In a package for handling and shipping articles, an open sided frame, an article within ,said frame, pallets within said frame at opposite sides of 'said article each comprising an outer base o f corrugated paper stock substantially conforming to the interior of said frame and spacer blocks of corrugated paper stock adhesively sesubstantially conforming to the interior of and closing the side of said frame and an inner hase and spacer blocks secured between said bases disposing said inner base in abutting relation to said article, the bases of the respective pallets being formed Aof corrugated paperstock, a corrugated paper stock liner of substantially channel cross section tting within said frame with its side flanges overlapping and seating on the outer faces of the outer bases of said pallets, and spaced retaining bands secured to said frame extending thereabout in overlying relation to said flanges and the outer bases of said pallets.

' v NELS H. PETERSEN.

No references cited. l

Disclaimer 2,476,623.-Nels H. Petersen, Racine, Wis. MATERIAL PACKAGING. Patent dated July 19, 194:9. Disclaimer iled Apr. 13, 1951, by the assignee, Addison-Semmes Oorpof/'atz'om Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims 1 and 2 of said patent.

[Oficial Gazette June 5,1951.]

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4712676 *Mar 3, 1986Dec 15, 1987Stanley-Bostitch, Inc.Shipping package containing coiled fastener packages
US5269422 *Feb 22, 1993Dec 14, 1993Gestion 127 Inc.Windshield and protecting divider assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/454
International ClassificationB65D85/48
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/48
European ClassificationB65D85/48