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Publication numberUS2476652 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 19, 1949
Filing dateNov 3, 1942
Priority dateNov 3, 1942
Publication numberUS 2476652 A, US 2476652A, US-A-2476652, US2476652 A, US2476652A
InventorsBlack John B
Original AssigneeHoneywell Regulator Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic manifold pressure regulator
US 2476652 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- July 1, 1949. J. B. BLACK 7 2,476,652

AUTOMATIC MANIFOLD PRESSURE REGULATOR Filed Nov. 3, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet l 1 FIGURE I M26711. VALVE COCKPIT' can ram. LEVER FIGURE 5 FIGLJRE 6 MOTOR i z r 26 28 24- IS MOTOR 4| TORQUE OTOR LECTRIC CLUTCH S L N D SOLENOID 35:: 39 .32 34, 8 34/ 37- l 37 36 \49 3| v 3| 33 33 f v laws Q 5 POTE N TI 0 ME TE I? PO TENTIOMETER INVENTOR. JOHN 5. BLACK ATTORNEY July 1, 19. J. B. BLACK 2,4?6,2 AUTOMATIC MANIFOLD PRESSURE REGULATOR Filed Nov. 3, 1942 2 Sheets$heet 2.

26 MOTOR 7 NGEARBox g 2a ELECTRIC CLUTCH r SOLENOID lo a} 24 26 Moron RE 3 POTENTI OMET'ER INVENTOR.

JOHN B. BLACK ATT N EIY Patented July 19, 1949 AUTOMATIC MANIFOLD PRESSURE REGULATOR John B. Black, Glen Arm, Md., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Company, Minneapolis, Minn., a corporation of Delaware Application November 3, 1942, Serial No. 464,422 10 Claims. (01. 123-102) This invention relates to an improved engine throttle control.

It is usual in engine throttle control mechanisms to have the butterfly valve or throttle valve of the engine controlled through a linkage attached to a manual control lever in the cockpit or control cab. The control lever usually operates on a calibrated quadrant and may be preset to position the throttle valve, to maintain a predetermined pressure in the manifold of the engine. Engines such as ordinarily used on airplanes or boats, where they are set for constant speed or power over a long period of time, can advantageously use this invention.

By this invention the control lever may be manually set to establish a predetermined pressure in the manifold of the engine, which in turn determines the power of the engine. After the position of the control lever has been manually set, by closing an electric circuit, the automatic device disconnects the manual control and thereafter responds to variations in the manifold pressure and makes the proper adjustment of the throttle valve to maintain the established manifold pressure substantially constant;

In the event of an electrical failure, the manual control is re-established and the valve, in

spite of its position at the moment, assumes the what adjustments are needed as the result of the throttle being back on manual control.

Further and other objects will become apparent from the description of the accompanying drawings which form a, part of this disclosure and in which like numerals refer to like parts.

' In the drawings: I

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of the engine throttle control.

Figure 2 shows diagrammatically a form of the automatic control and disconnect.

Figure 3 is a modified form of the automatic control and disconnect.

Figure 4 is an enlarged view partly in section of the clutch of Figure 3.

Figures 5 and 6 are the control circuit diagrams of Figures 2 and 3.

An airplane engine I is shown in Figure 1, having a manifold 2, and a linkage 3 for operating the control lever 4 of the throttle valve. The control lever 5, mounted on quadrant 6, is located in the cockpit or control cabin, and by linkage I through the mechanism 8, actuates linkage 3 to control the position of the throttle valve thus, regulating the power of the engine. The automatic control and disconnect are housed in 8, and more fully illustrated in subsequent figures.

The regulating mechanism which cooperates- .with mechanism in housing 8 will be more fully described.

Figure 2 shows the mechanism housing in 8 of Figure 1. Linkage l operated by the manual control lever moves arm l0 about the axis of shaft II, and thereby transmits a reciprocating motion to linkage 12. This linkage causes dis-v connect cam i3 which is secured to shaft M to move about the axis of the shaft and since linkage 3 is pivoted to the cam, the movement of the automatic control to the position of the manual control for the desired manifold pressure. Torque motor it when energized, through members I! and I1 causes the eccentric ill to raise linkage l2 so that follower I9 is raised out of the notch 20 in member l3. Thesurfaces 2| of member l3 act as guides so that when the eccentric is rotated to permit the downward motion of linkage I2, the follower 19 will slide on surfaces 2| and come to rest at notch 20. Thus the relative position of linkage 3 with respect to i will be re-established. Latch 22 pivots about 23 and is actuated by solenoid 24 to engage catch 25 so that when torque motor l6, and s0lenoid'24 are energized simultaneously, eccentric I 8 moves member i2 to the up position and members 22 and 25 hold it there. Motor 26, through a reduction gear 2'! and an electrically operated clutch :28 rotates shaft [4 to which cam I3 is secured to cause the automatic adjustment of throttle valve through member 3 in response to a pressure control device. Member 29 and spring 30 furnish a means for returning member I2 and follower ill to the manual actuation position when the motors and solenoids are deenergized.

Figure 5 shows the circuit diagram of the elements shown in Figure l, the torque motor l6 and solenoid 24, and clutch 28 are simultaneously energized when switch 3| is closed. Motor 26 moves member 3, to control the throttle valve in response to variations in the absolute manifold pressure. Duct 32 connects airtight box 33 with the manifold 2 so that the pressure in the box is the same as the pressure in the manifold and varies therewith. Sylphon" bellows 34 is biased by spring 35 to respond to the absolute pressure. Solenoid 36 is actuated by the po tiometer IE to cause core 31 to calibrate the absolute pressure bellows. Upon movement of the bellows, contact 33 makes contact with either 39 or 40 to cause a rotation of motor 28 in one or the other direction.

The operation of the device as disclosed in Figures 1, 2 and 5, is as follows: The lever 5 is manually controlled to adjust the throttle valve until a desired pressure is established in the manifold of the engine which is evidenced by the performance of the engine as indicated on the instrument panel. After this pressure has been established and it is desired to maintain that pressure automatically, switch 3| is closed, energizing the circuit shown in Figure 5. Torque motor immediately operates to disconnect the manual control from the throttle actuating mechanism, solenoid 24 operates to hold the disconnect in that position, clutch 28 couples the motor 26 with the shaft it to move the throttle control and mechanism. In moving the control lever 5, potentiometer I5 is set at a position corresponding to the pressure established in the manifold and energizes solenoid 36 to calibrate the Sylphon bellows 34 so that it will maintain contact 38 in a neutral position as long as the established pressure in th manifold remains constant and will make contacts 39 or 40 in response to variations in manifold pressure which in turn actuates the motor 28 to control the engine throttle. In the event of an electrical failure, or if the switch 3| is opened, the latch 22 is released due to the de-energizing of solenoid 24, and spring 30 furnishes the energy to return follower i9 through member i2 to the notch in member [3. It can be readily seen from the form of member l3, that regardless of the relative position of the follower to the cam surface 21, member [3 will be returned to the position determined by the follower which, in turn, returns the throttle to a position determined by follower is which is controlled by the position of the manual lever 5. It will be noted from the circuit diagram that the other electrical elements are de-energized so that manual control may easily be reconnected.

Figure 3 shows a modified formof the manual and automatic control mechanism which is a simplified modification of the above described device.

Figure 6 is a circuit diagram for the elements shown in Figure 3 in which the control of the motor 26 and clutch 28 are as above described. Solenoid 4i is connected through linkage 42 to disengage clutch portions 33 and 44. The linkage 42 operates to cause clutch portion It to slide on the splined shaft 45 out of engagement with portions 43, the spring 46 furnishes the energy to reengage clutch portions 13 and N in the event of a power failure. The other elements of this modification correspondingly numbered to the above described device are similar in construction and function. Linkage I moves linkage ill in response to the actuation of the control lever 5 to position the potentiometer It, at a point corresponding to the pressure desired in the manifold. The clutch portions are engaged and the electrical clutch 28 disengaged so that member 3 is moved to place the throttle valve in a position corresponding to the position of control lever 5. when switch 3| is closed, a solenoid it operates to disengage clutch portion 44 from 43 and thereafter motor 26 is operated as above described to automatically control the position of the throttle fold constant. In the event of a power failure, the spring 45 re-establishes the connection of manual control lever B through linkage I to member 3 for the manual control of the throttle.

The electric clutch 28 is necessary on shaft it because of the reduction gear train 21. Without disengaging clutch 28, free motion of shaft II and members i3 and 3 would be impossible.

From a consideration of the above structure, it should be obvious, that the element forming either disconnect mechanism shown, can be interchanged, that is, follower i9 might be placed upon linkage 3, and member I2 connected to member i3, with the necessary structural changes for the proper operation of the device. Members 43 and 44, and related structure might also be interchanged.

It is to be understood that certain changes, alterations, modifications and substitutions can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. In combination, an engine throttle valve, a control lever for moving said valve to establish a manifold pressure, an automatic mechanism to disconnect said lever from said throttle valve and thereafter, responsive to variations in manifold pressure, to move said throttle valve to maintain substantially constant, the. said manifold pressure established by said control lever, and a device whereby, upon cessation of the action of the automatic mechanism, said control lever will be reconnected to said throttle valve irrespective of their relative positions and said throttle valve will be caused to assume the position corresponding to the setting of said control lever.

2. In combination, an engine throttle valve, a lever for moving said valve to establish a manifold pressure, automatic means, including means to disconnect said lever from said throttle valve, responsive to variations in manifold pressure, to move said throttle valve to maintain substantially constant, the manifold pressure established by said lever, and means for reconnecting said lever and said throttle valve irrespective of their relative positions, upon failure of said automatic means.

3. An engine control adapted to be placed between the control lever and engine fuel fiow control means, comprising a linkage actuated by said control lever, a cam having a notch therein, a follower on said linkage which rests in the notch during manual control of said fuel flow control means, means on said cam to guide said follower into said notch, said cam being secured to a rotatable shaft, a second linkage adapted to control said fuel flow control means, pivoted to move with said cam, whereby the motion of the first mentioned linkage is transmitted by means of the cam to said second linkage, means for disconnecting said first linkage and follower from said notch in said cam, automatic control means for moving said cam and said second linkage to control said fuel flow control means, and spring means to return said follower to said notch to restore manual control upon the failure of the automatic control.

4. An engine control adapted to be placed between the control lever and fuel flow control means comprising a shaft, a portion of which is to maintain the established pressure of the mani- 7| portion of said shaft, a linkage means whereby motion of the said second portion of the shaft is means mounted on said shaft to transmit the motion from said portion of the shaft to a second portion of said shaft, a linkage means whereby motion of the said second portion of the shaft is transmitted to said fuel fiow control means, pressure responsive automatic control means adapted to move said second portion of said shaft, and means to disconnect said shaft portions when the automatic control means is active, and potentiometer means moved by said control lever to a predetermined position corresponding to the position of the control lever which establishes a manifold pressure, whereby said automatic control means is biased to maintain the established manifold pressure.

6. An engine control adapted to be placed between the control lever and fuel flow control" means comprising a shaft, a portion of which is adapted to be moved about its longitudinal axis by said control lever, a disconnectable clutch means mounted on said shaft to transmit the motion from said portion of the shaft to a second portion of said shaft, a linkage means whereby motion of the said second portion of the shaft is transmitted to said fuel flow control means, said clutch portions constructed and arranged to bringthe second shaft portion into a predetermined relationship with said first shaft portion upon engagement of said clutch portion.

7. An engine control adapted to be placed between the control lever and engine fuel flow control means, comprising a linkage actuated by said control lever, a disconnect means comprising a portion having a notch therein, and a follower portion which rests in the notch during manual control of said fuel flow control means, means on said notched member to guide the follower into said notch, a second lever actuated by motion of one of said disconnect portions to control said fuel flow control means lever, whereby motion of said first linkage is transmitted to said fuel flow control means, means for disengaging said follower from said notch, automatic control means for moving said fuel flow control means lever, and spring means to return said follower and said notched member to a predetermined'relative position to restore manual control upon the failure of the automatic control.

8. An engine control adapted to be placed between the control lever and the fuel control means comprising, first and second members disconnectable from each other and adapted to be respectively connected to said control lever and fuel control means, means biasing said members toward each other, said members having cooperating portions for causing their automatic connection together in a predetermined relation under the action of said biasing means irrespective of their relative positions when the biasing means is rendered effective, whereby when said members are connected together the position of the first member is an indication of the position of the second member, and means operable at will to disconnect said members against the action of the biasing means or to render the biasing means effective to cause automatic reconnection thereof.

.9. An engine control adapted to be placed between the control lever and the fuel control means comprisin first and second members disconnectable from each'other and adapted to be respectively connected to said control lever and fuel control means, means biasing said members toward each other, said members having cooperating portions for causing their automatic connection together in a predetermined relation under the action of said biasing means irrespec" tive of their relative positions when the biasing means is'rendered effective, whereby when said members are connected together the position 01 the first member is an indication of the position of the second member, pressure responsive automatic control means adapted to move said second member, and means operable at will to disconnect said members against the action of the biasing means and render said automatic control means operative or to render the biasing means effective to cause automatic reconnection of said members and render said automatic control inoperative.

10. An engine control adapted to be placed between the control lever and the fuel control means comprising first and second members disconnectable from each other and adapted to be respectively connected to said control lever and fuel control means, means biasing said members toward each other, said members having cooperating portions for causing their automatic connection together in a predetermined relation under the action of said biasing means irrespective of their relative positions when the biasing means is rendered effective, whereby when said members are connected together the position of the first member is an indication of the position of the second member, pressure responsive automatic control means adapted to move said second member, adjusting means for said automatic control means actuated by said first member, and

. means operable at will to disconnect said members against the action of the biasing means and render said automatic control means operative or to render the biasing means effective to cause automatic reconnection of said member and render said automatic control inoperative.

JOHN B. BLACK.

REFERENCES CITED UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Re. 14,359 Day et al Sept. 18, 1917 1,304,808 Royce May 27, 1919 2,034,263 Maybach Mar. 17, 1936 2,079,958 Dodson May 11, 1937 2,168,958 Lichtenstein Aug. 8, 1939 2,189,475 Saur Feb. 6, 1940 2,205,354 Gregg et ai June 18, 1940 2,217,364 Halford et al Oct. 8, 1940 2,233,319 Lozivit et a1. Feb. 25, 1941 2,248,780 Pierce July 8, 1941 2,282,529 Pierce May 12, 1942 2,285,344 Marples et al. June 2, 1942 2,296,213 Kretzschamar Sept, 15, 1942 2,330,650 Weiche Sept. 28, 1943

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4163432 *Aug 8, 1977Aug 7, 1979Robert Bosch GmbhElectrically motor driven and declutchable positioning device for a mechanical control
US4244335 *Nov 17, 1978Jan 13, 1981Derussy John HControl of vehicle engine fuel feed by electro-stress means
US4663713 *Jun 14, 1984May 5, 1987J. I. Case CompanyAutomatic power control for variable power train
US4799467 *Jul 15, 1987Jan 24, 1989Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaThrottle valve control system for an internal combustion engine
US5134979 *Sep 10, 1990Aug 4, 1992Vdo Adolf Schindling AgLoad adjustment device
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/350, 123/363, 123/361, 137/483
International ClassificationB64D31/02, B64D31/00
Cooperative ClassificationB64D31/02
European ClassificationB64D31/02