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Publication numberUS2476856 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 19, 1949
Filing dateAug 11, 1947
Priority dateAug 11, 1947
Publication numberUS 2476856 A, US 2476856A, US-A-2476856, US2476856 A, US2476856A
InventorsGeenens Leo
Original AssigneeGeenens Leo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lighting fixture assembly
US 2476856 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 19, 1949. GEENENS LIGHTING FIXTURE ASSEMBLY 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 11, 1947 L 5 @EENENS a E to: w

Patented July 19, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE LIGHTING FIXTURE ASSEMBLY Leo Geenens, Katonah, N. Y. Application August 11, 1947, Serial No. 787,891

This invention is an improved mounting for fluorescent lamps of the long, slim tubular type. The improved mounting is particularly advantageous where a number of lamps ar mounted in a long line, in groups connected in series, for l ghting an elongated passage, such as a vehicular or railway tunnel, corridors. loading platforms, and large rooms, although its use is not restricted to any particular locality.

The mounting is particularly advantageous, however, for lighting a vehicular tunnel and the invention will be particularly described in connection with such use.

In the prior art, tunnels have been lighted by providing inset cast iron boxes, set into the roof or sidewall of the tunnel, the outer or exposed parts being usually of bronze, serving to support protecting sheets of glass, above or behind which incandescent lamps are mounted. This type of fixture must be watertight, involving the use of gaskets. Such a fixture is quite expensive; moreover, in replacing the incandescent lamp, the protecting glass sheet must be removed, which is a time consuming operation. The same applies where fluorescent lamps are merely substituted for the incandescent lamps using appropriate inset boxes. In busy vehicular tunnels. trafiic fiows twenty-four hours a. day, and it is important that the lamps be replaced quickly, so that traflie is not blocked any longer than necessary.

One of the important objects of the invention is to provide an improved fixture for fluorescent lamps, one of the advantages of such a fixture being that it does not need to be recessed into the roof or sides of a tunnel and does not re, quire the use of sheets of glass coverin e essed lamps. nor the use of gasketed joints, thereby saving a great deal of expense.

Another important object is to provide a fluorescent tube fixture wherein an old or defective light may be removed and replaced in a few seconds.

In vehicular tunnels, greasy dust tends to de-.

' or the rinsing water coming in contact with the high potential terminals inside the fixture.

Another important object of the vinvention is to provide a fixture comprising essentially a Claims. (Cl. (F-51.11)

lighting cartridge including a tubular Jacket usually made of glass with closure plugs and electrodes therein. This cartridge is removably supported from end brackets secured to the wall or ceiling, so that by simply inserting the lghting cartridge in its place between the brackets, the electrical connections are made and the lamps are lighted. The'lamps used are usually tubular vapor lamps having a single contact at each end but lamps with double contacts at each end may also be accommodated.

Another important object Of the invention is to provide a fixture in which a unitary lighting cartridge composed of a jacket and one or more fluorescent lamps operatively mounted therein, can be removed and replaced in a few seconds by another similar cartridge, in the event that the lamps in any cartridge had become defective.

Another important object of the invention is the provision or a fixture which will require. when a number of them are mounted in a long line, a minimum number of supporting brackets; this is advantageous inasmuch as each bracket constitutes a break in the continuity of the line or light and each additional bracket involves additional cost. The lighting cartridge of my improved fixture permits the lighting of several lamps of conventional length in series, or specially built long lamps, without the use of intermediate supporting brackets in the wall or celling, thereby greatly increasing the spacing of the brackets and producting amore nearly continuous line of light.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a fixture in which the lampsare protected from breakage, from flying objects such as pieces of automobile tire chains or from flapping tarpaulins carried on tops of vehicles, or through blasts of air, such as occur when large vehicles travel at high speed in vehicular tunnels. The conventional tubular lamps themselves unenclosed in a jacket are too delicate to resist these conditions, particularly when long lamps are mounted horizontally and supported from their ends.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a fixture in which water and cleaning solutions can flow freely through the high voltage contact-making parts, without causing an electric current to flow through the water or solution to the workman applying them.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a fixture in which a means is provided to prevent electric shocks to the workmen handling the lighting cartridge.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a fixture in which the fluorescent lamp is enclosed in a chamber, thereby protecting it from the cold air in winter and thereby greatly increasing the light output of the lamp.

4 3 Further advantages of structure and operation will be described in connection with the accompanying drawings, showing the invention in more detail wherein:

Figure Ilf'i aside view, partly in section onja reduced" scale.' of several of the cartridges th ir es ective brackets, mounted in line in e r p block 30. A high voltage terminaldnsulator l2 -is.held'against the other side of the conductor forming the subject matter of this invention.

. Figure 2 is a side elevation of the flourescent light unit and their cooperating bracket, ona larger scale, with parts in section, transformer with high and low voltage terminals and cooperating with the adjacent ends of two cartridges.

Figure .3 is a vertical cross section on line 8-4 of Figure 2.

' showing the bestos washer 22 and a metal grounding shim 24, grounded by wire l2d, Fig. 3, connecting it to grounding clamp l2a. Seated against this shim is a h gh .voltage terminal insulator 26 for the high voitagelcbnductorf'lt, energized by its connection to high voltage lead It of the transformer.

bybolts 33 secured to an asbestos strip 33aand "ispro'vided'with a convex annular projecting insulat ng plug 8|, having a hole 36 therein.

Figure 4 is a vertical cross section on line 1-4 01' Figure 2-.

Figure 5 is a vertical cross section on line of Figure 2.

Figure 6 is a vertical cross section on lineJ-l Y Figure 11 is an elevation of the grounding shim.

Figure 12 is an elevation of the high voltage terminal.

Figure 13 is a side view of the lighting cartridge. Referring now to these drawings, the fixture comprises a metal orplastic bracket 2, with bare or' painted or porcelain nameled surfaces, anc'hored to the cable box in. embedded in the roof or walls of a tunnel, for example, by bolts 4. The housing includes a box 6 for the transformer 8. A power cable 9 is connected to bolt "4 passing through a porcelain insulator llb, being secured to box 6 by a screw llic passing through the insulator and engaging a securing washer llld on the inside of box 8. Bolt lta is connected to one lead I I of the primary of the transformer, the return lead It being connected to a bolt similar to Na, also mounted in insulator llb and in turn connected to a continuing portion to of the power cable leading to the next adjacent fixture. The power cables may be housed in pipes ll. 7

The low voltage or grounded lead 12 of the transformer is electrically connected to a clamp l2a, the clamp being electrically connected to box 8, and carrying a grounding cable lZb, this grounding cable being secured to clamp Ila, in electrical contact with cable box la. The cable box is grounded in any convenient way, as by connecting it to a bare grounding cable (not shown), extending along from one cable box to thenext.

The high voltage lead I3 01' the transformer is connected to the fluorescent lamps; as will be described below.

. inwardly extending annular rib 18 defining an opening ll; Seated against flange I8 is an as! Seated against the other side of flange I8 is a grounding spring 40, secured to the outer end of which is a low voltage terminal cup 42 provided with a low voltage contact pin 44 anchored by nut 48. Spring 40 and cup 42 may be connected by wire to grounding clamp l2a or otherwise grounded, the low voltage of the secondary of the transformer being grounded, through no and I20, as already described.

" The lighting cartridge, for quick connection and disconnection with the foregoing bracket,

will now be described. This lighting cartridge comprises a straight tubular jacket 50 of glass or other transparent or translucent material, within which is coaxially housed one or more fluorescent tubes 52, of the'hot or cold cathode type, having a single'electrode 54 at one end and a single electrode 56 at the other end of the container. Tubes 52 are positioned in their jacket by annular holders 58 and 60' at the ends of the jacketand by similar holders atthe connection point of two lamps when several lamps are used in series.

At the high voltage end, jacket 50 has threaded thereon a metal can 62 having a terminal flange 14 for holding an insulating closure plug 66,

which has an annular flange for seating against the end of 50. Closure plug 56 is recessed as at II to fit over, but in spaced relation with, projection N, to define therebetween a drainage passage [0 for water or cleaning solution. Closure plug 66 is provided with a high voltage electrodepin 12, which connects the high voltage terminal 30 with terminal 54 of the fluorescent tube.

At the low voltage end of thedighting cartridge, jacket has threaded thereon a metal cap 14, having a terminal flange 1G for holding an insulating closure plug [8, which has an annular projection 80. Closure plug 18 is' centrally recessed to receive the low voltagecontact pin 44, which bears against electrode 82 in the recess. Electrode 82, at its left end, engages with a threaded contact washer 84, in contact with connecting spring 86 which in turn is in contact with holder which contacts with the electrode 56 of the fluorescent tube.

It will be apparent that the low voltage connections just described apply to a second jacket 50 and light 52 of the next aligned lighting cartridge, and that the described connections are duplicated at the right hand end (not shown) of jacket 50 and light 52 shown at the right of Figure 2. v

It will be seen that to insert a lighting cartridge, the right hand end must be inserted in cup 42 and pushed to the right to compress spring 40 until the left hand end of the lighting cartridge has cleared the lower edge of cavity it after which the left hand end can be lifted and inserted h If, however, the left hand end' Conductor 28 terminates in contact over insulator ll. his hand would not come in contact with electrode I! because of the projection 80 and therefore he would not complete the circuit oi-the lamps and be subjected to an electric shock.

An accumulation of dust, carbon, moisture, etc, on the exterior of jacket I of the light cartridge might form a conductive layer that would be dangerous to an operator grasping jacket 50 of the light cartridge for removing it. In order to avoid this. bracket 2 isprovided with a resilient grounding spring ll, anchored by screw 92, which bears against the metal cap 62 of the lighting cartridge, as shown at the right of Figure 2. Any stray voltage emanating from pin 12 over the surface of insulator 86 is thereby grounded. This spring is preferably made of phosphor-bronze.

The described lighting cartridges are preferably mounted in a continuous straight line and two or more may be in series, as in Figure 1.

In operation, with a lighting cartridge in operative position, as in Figure 2, a defective light may be quickly removed by an operator who grasps the cartridge, moves it to the right against spring ll, sumciently to disengage and clear the inter-fitting insulator 3| and 66, to clear the right hand end of cavity l6 and of course, breaking the high voltage connection between electrode 12 and contact 30. The cartridge is then moved downwardly and pulled out of low voltage terminal cup 42 and clear of the left hand edge of cavity it in the adjacent bracket. A new cartridge may be inserted by reversing these operations. These operations may be performed in a few seconds, an important consideration in vehicular tunnels where trafilc should be interrupted for as short a time as possible.

This quick change is made possible by the improved lighting cartridge, comprising the jacket 50, the fluorescent tube mounted therein, and the contact electrodes at each end of the cartridge; it is also made possible by the improved bracket, built as described, to cooperate with such improved lighting cartridge.

Lighting cartridges and brackets as described may be washed and cleaned by a pressure stream of cleaning solution and water, without danger of grounding through the stream. The right hand end of cavity l6 and the zig-zag passage 10 impede the flow towards high voltage contact 12 but any water or solution which may reach this contact will drain away. Any stray high voltage current is grounded by the grounding spring 80 and the grounded metal shim 24.

With the cartridge of this invention, shown in its entirety in Fig. 13, the relatively fragile light tubes 52 are always protected by the heavier protecting jacket 50. The rigidity afforded by the heavier jacket 50 provides a cartridge of sub- I stantial length, much longer than could be ospanned by an ordinary fluorescent lamp; single jacket 50 therefore carries several lamps 'infline, as shown in Fig. 13.

A particularly important feature of the jacket 50 is that it encloses an annular insulating body of air surrounding the lamps, serving to keep them relatively warm, which is especially valuable in winter, because the lighting effect of fluorescent lamps is greatly diminished at low temperatures.

nated. Any moisture is drained away through passage ll. Any stray high voltage is grounded through end cap 62 and contact 90.

With the unitary cartridge and cooperating fixture of the present invention, a defective or worn-out lamp may be very quickly replaced,

with a minimum of interruption to trafllc, a feature of particular importance in a trafllc tunnel.

While the preferred embodiment of the invention has been described in detail, it should be understood that the invention is not limited to the exact details shown, but may be carried out in other ways.

I claim as my invention:

1. A lighting cartridge for fluorescent lamps, comprising a translucent tubular jacket, a closure plug of insulating material for each end of said jacket, a cap detachably secured to each end of said jacket, each can including means bearing against the outer peripheral portion of said plug, and cooperating with the end of said jacket, for holding said closure plug in place in the end of the jacket, each of said closure plugs being provided with an electrode passing therethrough, a tubular fluorescent lamp mounted in said jacket, and electrodes in the ends of said fluorescent lamp in electrical contact with the electrodes in the plugs in the ends of the jackets, the whole constituting a unitary cartridge which may be handled and installed or removed as a unit in relation to a suitable fixture.

2. A lighting cartridge for fluorescent lamps, comprising a translucent tubular jacket, a closure plug of insulating material for each end of said jacket, a cap detachably secured to each end of said jacket, each cap including means bearing against the outer peripheral portion of said plug, and cooperating with the end of said jacket, for holding said closure plug in place in the end of the jacket, one of said closure plugs being internally recessed in its outside face, an electrode passing through said recessed plug and positioned in said recess, an electrode passing through the other closure plug, a tubular fluorescent lamp mounted in said jacket, and electrodes in the ends of the fluorescent lamp in electrical contact with the electrodes in the jacket, the whole constituting a unitary cartridge which may be handled and installed or removed as a unit in relation to a suitable fixture.

3. In combination, a pair of horizontally disposed, open-ended brackets, a high voltage terminal positioned in each bracket, a low voltage terminal positioned in each bracket, spring means positioned in each bracket and cooperating with its low voltage terminal; light ng cartridges cooperating with said brackets, each lighting cartridge comprising a translucent tubular jacket, a closure plug of insulating material for each end of said jacket, a cap detachably secured to each end of said jacket, each cap including means bearing against the outer peripheral portion of said closure plug and cooperating with the end of said jacket, for holding said closure plug in place in the end of the jacket, each of said closure plugs being provided with an electrode passing therethrough, a tubular fluorescent lamp mounted in said jacket, electrodes in the ends of said fluorescent lamp in electrical contact with the electrodes in the plugs in the ends of the jacket, the whole constituting a unitary carauaase 4. The combination "as claimed in claim 3,

wherein the cap at the high voltage end of; said cart-ridgeis of metal and wherein the adjacent portion of the bracket is provided with means contacting said metal can for grounding it.

;In combination, a pair of horizontally disposed, open-ended brackets, a recessed high voltage terminal in each bracket, a high voltage contact set within the recess of each bracket, a low voltage terminal positioned in each bracket, spring means positioned in each bracket and cooperating with its low voltage terminal; lighting cartridges cooperating with said brackets, each lighting cartridge comprising a translucent tubular jacket, a closure plug of insulating material for each end of said jacket, a cap detachably secured to each end of said jacket, each cap including means bearing. against the outer peripheral portion ofsaid closure plug andcooperating with the end of 'said jacket, for holding said closure plug in place in the end of the jacket,

Y one of said closure plugs being internally recessed in its outside face, a first electrode passing through said recessed plug and positioned in said recess, a second electrode passing through 8 the electrodes in said closure"plugs,'the whole constituting 'a unitary cartridge which may be handled and installed or removed as a unit by engaging or disengagingone end of said cartridge with or from said spring means in said other bracket, said-spring means normally serving to hold the electrode at the opposite end oi the tubular lamp in electrical'contact with the high voltage terminal in the other bracket. said convex portion of the high voltage terminal interfltting withrthe concave portion of the closure plug at the high voltage end of the lamp,

' said convex and concave portions when so interthe other closure plug, a tubular fluorescent lamp mounted in said jacket, electrodes in the ends of the fluorescent lamp in electrical contact with the electrodes in the jacket, the whole constituting a unitary cartridge which may be handled and installed or removed as a unit by engaging or disengaging one end of said cartridge with or from said spring means in one bracket.-said spring means normally serving to hold said first electrode of said cartridge in electrical contact with the recessed high voltage terminal in the other bracket. L

6. The combination as claimed in claim 5, wherein the cap at the high voltage end of said cartridge 'is of metal and wherein the cooperating portlon'of the bracket is provided'with means contacting said metal cap for grounding it.

'7. In combination, ,a pair of horizontally disposed, open-ended brackets, a high voltage terminal, including a convex portion, positioned in one bracket, 2. low voltage terminal positioned in the other bracket, spring means positioned in said other bracket and cooperating with said low voltage terminal therein; a lighting cartridge comprising a translucent tubular jacket, a closure plug of insulating material for the high voltage end of said jacket, said closure plug having a concave portion, a closure plug of insulating material for the low voltage end of said jacket, a cap detachablysecured to each end of said jacket, each cap including means bearing against the outer peripheral portion of said closure plug and cooperating with the end of said jacket, for holding said closure plug in place in the end 'of the jacket, each of said closure plugs being provided with an electrode passing therethrough, a tubular fluorescent lamp mounted in said jacket,

electrodes in the end of the lamp in contact with 70 within said jacket, each fitted being spaced apart to provide a drainage channel for moisture therebetween.

8. The combination as claimed, in claim '7, wherein the cap at the high voltage end of the jacket is of metal and wherein the bracket is provided with means contacting said metal cap for grounding it.

9. In combination, a pair of open-ended brackets, high and low tension terminals carried by each bracket, each high tension terminal comprising a plug made of insulating material and having a convex portion provided with a recess; an electrodein said recess; lighting cartridges cooperating with said'brackets, each cartridge including a translucent jacket, a fluorescent tube jacket being provided with an end closure plug of insulating material having a concave portion, an electrode positioned in theconcave portion of said closure plug, a cap, detachably secured to each end of said jacket, each cap including means bearing against the outer peripheral portion or said closure plug and cooperating with the end of said jacket, for =holding said closure plug in place in the end of the jacket, said convex and concave portions of said REFERENCES CITED 4 The following references are of record in the fileof this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name I Date 1,084,362 Reagan Jan. 13, 191 1,137,773 Marsden May 4, 191 1,291,443 Dorsey Jan. 14, 191 1,696,663 Becker, Dec. 25, 192 1,791,625 Kollath Feb; 10, 1931 1,976,378 Vrooman Oct. 9, 1934 2,109,341 Rebl Feb. 22, 1938 2,318,536 Stern May 4, 1943 2,336,750 Roney et a1. Dec. 14, 1943 2,392,202 Tornblom Jan. 1, 1946 2,393,180 Merrill Jan. 15, 1946 2,401,555 De Reamer June 4, 1946 2,438,012

Laidig Mar. 16, 1948

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2644027 *Sep 6, 1949Jun 30, 1953Columbia Electric And Mfg CompOutdoor fixture for tubular lights
US2848599 *May 25, 1953Aug 19, 1958Wilson A CharbonneauxFluorescent lighting fixtures
US3043951 *Oct 9, 1959Jul 10, 1962Curtis Electro Lighting IncUniversally mountable lighting fixture
US3060310 *Nov 2, 1959Oct 23, 1962Gen Motors CorpTubular lamp fixture
US3250912 *Jul 26, 1963May 10, 1966Holophane Co IncLuminaire assembly
US3801811 *Nov 15, 1971Apr 2, 1974L GeenensLighting fixture assembly for tunnels and other locations
US4070570 *Jun 29, 1976Jan 24, 1978General Energy Development CorporationLighting apparatus
US5357412 *May 5, 1992Oct 18, 1994U.S. Philips CorporationLine illumination device and mounting member for this device
US6632100Apr 23, 1997Oct 14, 2003Anthony, Inc.Lighting system method and apparatus socket assembly lamp insulator assembly and components thereof
US6641419Aug 31, 1998Nov 4, 2003Anthony, Inc.Lighting circuit, lighting system method and apparatus, socket assembly, lamp insulator assembly and components thereof
US6773130Aug 29, 1997Aug 10, 2004Anthony, Inc.Lighting circuit, lighting system method and apparatus, socket assembly, lamp insulator assembly and components thereof
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DE942101C *May 27, 1950Apr 26, 1956Broekelmann Jaeger & BusseWasserdichte Fassung fuer Roehrenlampen, insbesondere Gasentladungslampen
DE948797C *Aug 8, 1950Sep 6, 1956Siemens Schuckertwerke GmbhLeuchte fuer Leuchtstoffroehren zur Verwendung in explosionsgefaehrdeten Raeumen mit Fassungen, die je aus einem als selbstaendiges Stueck auf das Roehrenende aufsetzbaren Teil bestehen
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/219, 439/244, 315/254
International ClassificationF21S4/00, F21V31/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21S4/003, F21V31/00
European ClassificationF21S4/00L, F21V31/00