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Publication numberUS2477441 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 26, 1949
Filing dateOct 19, 1946
Priority dateOct 19, 1946
Publication numberUS 2477441 A, US 2477441A, US-A-2477441, US2477441 A, US2477441A
InventorsLeonard W Cole
Original AssigneeLeonard W Cole
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy gear
US 2477441 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 26, `1949.

1 w. COLE 2,477,441

" TOY GEAR Filed Oct. 19, l94-6 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Mlm 20 E Haz/552W@ L. w. COLE July 2s, 1949.

TOY GEAR s sheets-sheet l2 Filed l001'.. 19, 1946 v, .um

`Jul), 26, 1949.

L. w. coLE 2,477,441

TOY GEAR 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Oct. 19, 1946 Patented July 26, 1949 y TED STATES Fl CE "TOY GEAR Leonard W. Cole, North Bi-animal,-` Golm.

Application October 19, 1946, Y"Serial'No'104,409

. '6 Claims.

".Ihepresenti invention lrelates to improvements in fgears r and #relates rfmore :particularly kto 4vtoy gears.

1011er` of the -1 main` objects 'of the presentV invention is to provide toy gearsfwhich1vvillservernot onlymo. entertainbutalso `.toinstructin the mechanical arts.

WAnotherflobject ofthe present invention is to provide superior ltoy f gears whereby :various typesfof gears fmayl'fbe intermeshed to instruct in the fum'ttioningtlflerefp-andto` aiord` entertainnient.

Miur-therr object of the present invention is to prov-idefgears ofthe-*character referred to wherebyiiynon-circular gears l may be intermeshed with each. other `and/or1vvi15h circular. :gears to enable alistudent vto visually observethe eiects of :the resultant coaction.

Stll f another Aobjectoithe:present invention is toprovide A:atiatlowrcostfor manufacture, .a toy gear-set having .zits fcomponents so :related .that variable l speed-.drives 1 and ufthe; like are demonstrated. i Y iWith'theabove and other objectsin `vievv, fas wil1 appear to those-skilled in theartfrom the present disclosure, `this invention includesallf featureslin'the 4saidfdisclosure `which are novel over the'fprior: art.

11n the :accompanyingfdrawings.in lwhich certain"modesl.ofzcarrying out the presentinvention are shownior 4illustrative purposes: i

Fig. liisla brokenperspectiveview ofra mounting-plate having mounted :thereon Afor j rotation al circularrgearcandt a fcoactingzf rectangular gear;

Fig. 2 is a sectionaLvieW taken oni` the `1ine 2,2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a plan or face view of the mountingplaterandra geareset-.comprising :a circularV gear, a;triangularrgear Aanda rectangular gear;

`rlig.-r4;.is;ua brokenrplan-orface View fof the m'ountingeplate.` having a circular gear 'andan elliptical'fgear mounted thereon;

isa broken plan or` face view, of two interme'shing rectangular :gears mounted upon the mounting-plate butiwith their'respective centering-iplates inxplacerto permit turning' movement about their:respectivecenters;

Fig. 6 is an edge'viewofthe assembly of Fig. 5;

7i :isi a :brokensectional `View on `an--'enlarged scalelandstakeni on the line1--1A of.` Fig. 5;

`ffleigriz isfaperspectivetView` of` one `of the centering'- plates fori the rectangular L-gears;

flig.i:91is:aperspective.View of the mountingplate;

.'Fig. 210 Vis? avviewa similar'Y tofl'lg.' 5 -butwshow-ing tvvo"=v triangular fgears, :each fprovided with their respectivatriangularfcenteringeplates;

Fig; 12 isvaperspectiveiview of. onerof the centeringaplates fforff. the ztriangular.v gears of Figs. 10 andll;

fFig. :13 is" axvewasimilanto .'Figs.: 5 `and 10 but showing'twoiintermeshing 'elliptical gears, @both of which are .rprovlded :with their :respective ellipticall centering-plates;

.1 -Fig..15 is :a perspective'view; ofA one of the centering-platesofzthe elliptical gearsfof'rliigs. 18'-and 14.

s -For' the'.purpose-of;y holdingva pluralityy of gears inzmeshing relationship,agzmountingmlate generally; :designatedxby the;y reference. character f III, ispreferably' employed.

In the. instance shown, thel mounting-plate I0 is formed lwithffa seriesnofseven (more orless) spaced ,sockets .orppassagesI-Ilp I2,A I3,I4,` I5, I6 and I-'Lweacheof whichiis :adapted to receive one of a1tp1urality ofncorrespondingguide-studs I8. Each'. ofathet saidygu-idefstuds I 8511s formed intermediata-its respective-:opposite ends-With .anannular spacing-ange I9 :iwhchiis adapted-.to-seat against` the stop.. orA1 forward face of4 the mountingplatee. IfIl vwhena-a.. givenrgiuideestud. is. inserted .into any .onel of r,the-:sockets I I .toiA I1. inclusive.

:For-.use in conjunction with the mountingfplate I0 and the guide-studs I8, it is preferred to providea:. plurality .of `..circular rgears .,2 0,. a n plurality of. 'rectangular gears. 2 I ,..ai plurality of.,triang.ular gears -22,.1and `a E.pluralitiof -elliptical gears 23, thougha lesserlnumber of gearsandtypes thereof will:providecan...entertaining and instructive set.

Each ofthe rectangular gears `2I .is formed centrally.with.a substantially-rectangular clearance-opening .5.24- extending .through the gear from facetoiace. Formedwithin the clearanceopening `24 and extending slightly inwardly towardthecentercof thegear, isa `stop-rib 25 narrowerathanthethickness,fthegear of which it forms a .part-and having its respective opposite faces .set .inwarjfllvwith respect to the adjacent facescftheggear. .The innersurface of the stoprib25.extends.in parallelism wththe pitch-line of `lthe,gear..il I .of which 4itiforms. a. feature and provides aguidefsurface ,for rpurposes as will hereinafter appear, and`having a'lengthJin .a peripheral direction less Vthan the peripheral lengthoof saidpitch-.lina i gear 2| and may be held therein by friction or in any other desired manner.

Each centering-plate 26 above referred tois provided centrally with a bearing-passage 28V and is also provided with an eccentric-receiving passage 28 located eccentrically withrespect to the said central bearing-passage 28.

Each of the triangular gears 22 above referred to is formed centrally with a substantially-triangularclearance-opening 3U extending through the said gear from face to face. Formed within th`cle`arance-opening3l) and lprojecting toward the center of the gear is a stop-erin y3| which is narrower Athan'the thickness of the gear of which itfformsa part and has its respective opposite faces set inwardly with respect to the adjacent faces of the gear.' The inner surface of the stoprib 3l -providesa guide-surface which extends in parallelism with thepitch line of the gear 22 of which it forms a feature in'a manner similar to the`inn`er face of the stop-rib 25 of ,theV rectangular gears 2 I. The said guide-surface has a length in a peripheral direction materially less than the peripheral length of the said pitch-line.v

For the purpose of closing the clearance-opening V3|lrin ak given triangular gear 22, two (more orless) centering-plates 32 V(Figs. 10, 11 and 12)" may be employed. Each of the saidcenteringplates 32 is generallyloftriangular outlineY to snugly fit the, triangular clearance-openingY 30 in a'ygivevn gear 22 and is provided around its edge,v in a position flush with onerface, with a flange 33,whichisadaptedto'have its inner face seated againstv the adjacent face of the stop-rib 3| in a'manner similar toA the seating of a centeringplate 26 ,against the Vstop-rib 25 of the rectangular gears 2Ibefore described. Y

jPreferably, Yeach triangular centering-plate is formed centrally with abearing-passage 34 and is also formedvadjacent itsY perimeter with an eccentric-receiving.passage 35, as is shown in Figs. and 12.

Y Like the rectangular gears 2| and the triangular gears 22, the elliptical gears 23, before referred to, areY each provided with a central clearance-opening 36 which in this instance, however, is of elliptical form and generally conforms in contour to the pitch-line of the teeth of the gear 2,3 of-which it is a feature.

. Formed within-the,,clearance-opening 3D and projecting towardY the center of the gear, is a stop-.ribl which, like the stop-ribs and 3| before referred to,` is narrower than the thickness of the gear of which it forms apart and'has its respectivelopposite faces set inwardly with/respecttorthe adjacent faces of the gear. inner surface of the stop-rib 31 serves as a guidesurface andextends'in parallelism with the pitchlineof the .gearV 23 of Awhich itforms a feature. The lengthof the said guide-surface in `a peripheral-direction is kmaterially less than the said pitch-line.

Like the rectangular gears and,triangular` gears 22, the elliptical gears 23 are each provided The with two (more or less) centering-plates 38 which, however, in this instance are of elliptical outline complementing the elliptical outline of the elliptical gear and snugly fitting with a friction nt within the elliptical clearance-opening 36 thereof.

Each centering-plate 38 is formed upon its edge in a position flush with one face, with a flange 39 extending entirely around its perimeter. The said flange 39 is adapted to have its inner face seated against the adjacent face of the stop-rib' 5l, in a manner similar to the seating of the lpreviously described centering-plates 26 and 32.

Preferably and as shown, each elliptical centering-plate 38 is formed centrally with a bearing-passage 40 and is formed eccentrically adjacent its periphery with an eccentric-receiving passage 4|. Y

Preferably the gears 2|, 22 and 23 have their respective clearance-passages extending cornpletely therethrough though notnecessarily so, since yeach of said Vgears may be otherwise provided with an inwardly-facing guide-surface which extends in substantial parallelism with th respective pitch-lines.

The functioning ofthe elements of Figs. `1 `and 2 The various relements above described maybe assembled in different relationships such, for instance, as that shown in Figs. 1 and 2. yIn this arrangement, a. guide-stud I8 is installed (by friction or otherwise) in the socket or passagel I |V of the mounting-plate and acircular gear 20 is mounted upon the said guide-stud with lcapacity for rotation with respect thereto. Another guidestud I8 is installed in the socket or pasage I3 in the mounting-plate I0 in a position Vclosely adjacent the periphery of the circular gear 20. A rectangular gear 2|, from which its centeringplates 26 have been omitted, is slipped over the last-'mentioned guide-stud I8 after a spacingwasher 42 has been first slipped over the said guide-stud. Y

Now when the circular gear 20 is turned in any suitable manner, the rectangular gear 2| will be turned by the said gear 20 through an irregular path, since the inner face of its stop-rib 25 will ride along the surface of the adjacent guidestud I8. As before pointed out, the inner face of the stop-rib 25 is substantially parallel throughout its length with the pitch-line of the rectangular gear of which it forms a part.

If desired, the rectangular gear Y2| may be turned through its irregular path, to thus, in

turn, drive the circular gear 20.

The functioning of the elements of Fig. 3

In Fig. 3, three guide-studs I8 are respectively installed in the sockets or passages I2, I4 vand I6 of the mounting-plate I0. A triangular gear 22 (minus its centering-plates 32) is slipped over the particular guide-stud I8 which is installed in the socket I I. A circular gear 20 is installed upon the particular guide-stud I8 mounted in the socket I4. Slipped over the Vguide-stud |18 in the socket I -6 of the mounting-plate I D is a rectangular gear (minus its centering-'plates 2B) in'position to mesh with the said gear 20.

Now when the circular gear 20 is turned it will cause both the triangular gear 22 and the rectangular gear 2| to turn in theirrespective irregular paths around the'particular 'guide-studs I8 eX- tending into their respective clearance-'openings suenan...

Instead of propelling the triangular gear .'22

zamen viaiidtthe'f rectanguamgean` 2 I by means' of -theicir- -cuiar gear F20 irlnfithe .fassembly `shown, the .rremainingztworgearsamay@ `be;turopel]edrby;aprdying force to either the said triangular gear 22corfthe "sectangulan'gean 2 I ."The 'functioning of `the elements `of Fig. 4

Figa/i, n two` :guide-studs.: It varerespectively `Installed the` sockets i. or: passages I Il and l I 3fm? `thermountingf-plate If. Mounteid `for `rotation napontthe 'guide-stu'd I8A in'A the socket;A I I isaa 'cir- .cularigear s 20, :fivhile slipped overt thef Lguidei-lstud ieof theso'cket Itrisone ofthe elliptic gearsfZB.

:New wheniqthe :circularl'gear 2li'. is .propelledit vwiilzcause the Vcomplementary elliptical gear rt lltorride aroundi theVguide-stud I B'which'" projects .c'1'1toiits-- clearancez-fopening:36'r from the socket I3 intheznrountingeplate It.

.ff lrrlesired, inthe elliptic l :gear 23 may be :first fitiirnedztofthereby cause therrotationfofiits complemen-tal circular'geari.

The unctioningof the members ofFigs.`5, 6, '7 and "`8 In the organization now being'describedgtwo guideestuds' I-B-'arerespectively installed in the sockets or passages II and Il! of the mountingplate I il. Tw-orectangular gears 2 I; are Shown as eachprovided with two centering-plates 216. .The assemblies each comprising a rectangularV gear 2| and its two centering-plates 2t, are respectively installed upon" theguide-studs I8` for concentric rotation.

Now when either of thetwo. rectangular -gears istnr-ned, it will eiect the turning of the :other .at-irregular.v rates of movement, due totti-ieA constantly changing radius of Contact between the teeth of the meshing rectangular gears.

The functioning of the elements of Figs. 10, 11 and 12 In the figures just referred to, two guide-studs I8 are shown as respectively mounted in the sockets II and I of the assembly-plate I0.

Two triangular gears 22 each with its two centering-plates 32 installed in its clearance-opening 3Q, are shown as mounted on the said guidestuds in intermeshing relationship. The mounting referred to is effected by slipping the bearing-passages 34 of the aforesaid centering-plates over the guide-studs in question.

Now when either one of the triangular gear assemblies has manual force applied to it, it will cause the turning movement of the other at varying rates of speed as the radius of coaction changes.

The functioning of the elements of Figs. 13, 14 and Two guide-studs IB are shown as respectively installed in the sockets I I and I4 of -the assemblyplate I and each thereof extends into the aligned bearing-passages 4|) of an adjacent pair of elliptical centering-plates 38. Each pair of centeringplates 38 is installed in the elliptical clearancepassage of one ofthe elliptical gears 23.

Now when either one of the elliptic gear assemblies is turned, it will propel the other thereof at varying ratios of speed due to the changing radius of coaction.

The respective eccentric-receiving sockets 29, and 4I of the various centering-plates 26, 32 and 38 are adapted to receive any suitable stud or the like by means of which one gear-unit maybe connected by a link to another gear-unit to produce further interesting and instructive effects.

'@neliinventiontmayzbercarriedidutinzotheiespecir-itwaysthanthosehereimsetffortlnwithoutdeparting:fromithexspirit .and essentialich-aracteristics ofiV the invention;.:an'dtheazpresentfzembodiments are,r1therefore,- to .fbe-nconsideredrin alli'respectsdfas illustratives and not restrictiv tand tail changes:comingrwi-thini the :'.meaning arrdlrequivlalency range cf. the appended'claims are'intended tolte` embraced therein.

".Lclaim:

1.v A "convertible?'nonecirculan-toylfgear-unitlior coactionwwithnotherfzsimilar Agearsfofta toyrgearset 1 and including inzcombination: at gear having substantially radially-projecting integral @teeth arranged on a non-circular pitch-line anditprovided* withinztheconnes thereofwithf'asubstantially continuous :non-'circular inwardlyfacing guider-surface for 4^engagement`E withfiagguideestiid or' the:l like, the *said* non-circular guideesuifa-ce being' of -1less'peripheral length.thantheperipheral length of fthe non-circular pitch-line lofthergear and extending `in substantial 1 parallelism Etherewith pand-ai removable-and replaceable centeringmem-ber vprovided Vsubstantially 7centrally Itv'v'i'th bearing-means, the said" centeringemerrberbeing extendable-across the icentralporti-on of "theVJ gear to 'convert -the samer for:'rotationaboutssbstantiallyiits center. l

`2. convertible non-circular toyf gear-'uint4J for coacton with-other similar fgearsl'of-af`toygear set andE including' inf/combination :af-gearfhaving substantially .radially-projecting f-i-ntegral -teeth arranged: yon 1.a non#circularrpitchliine *andV providedfwithin` the' connesL therefl-witlra:substantially-continuous non-circular learanceeopeing for the reception'of a guide-"stud forY thef'l'i'keearid extending through the gear from face to face, the said clearance-opening having a lateral boundary-surface of less peripheral length than the peripheral length of the non-circular pitch-line of the gear and extending in substantial parallelism therewith; and a removable and replaceable centeringemember provided substantially centrally with bearing-means, the said centeringmember being attachable to the said gear and extendable across the clearance-opening therein to convert the gear for rotation about substantially its center.

3. A convertible non-circular toy gear-unit for coaction` with other similar gears of a toy gearset and including in combination: a gear having substantially radially-projecting integral teeth arranged on a non-circular pitch-line Iand provided within the confines thereof with a substantially-continuous non-circular clearance-opening for the reception of a guide-stud or the like and extending through the gear from face to face, the said clearance-opening having a lateral boundarysurface of less peripheral length than the peripheral length of the non-circular pitch-line of the gear and extending in substantial parallelism therewith; and a pair of complemental removable and replaceable centering-members each provided substantially centrally with bearingmeans, the said centering-members being attachable to the said gear and extendable respectively across the opposite ends of the clearance-opening therein to convert the gear for rotation about substantially its center.

4. A convertible non-circular toy gear-unit for coaction with the other similar gears of a toy gear-set and including in combination: a gear having substantially radially-projecting integral teeth arranged on a non-circular pitch-line and provided within the confines thereof with a substantially-continuous non-circular inwardly-facing guide-surface for engagement with a guidestud or'the like, the said non-circular guide-surface being of less peripheral length than the peripheral length of the non-circular pitch-line of the gear and extending in substantial parallelism therewith; a'removable and replaceable centering-member provided substantially centrally with bearing-means, the said centering-member being extendable across the central portion of the said gear to convert the gear for rotation about substantially its center; and eccentric-drive means carried by the said centering-member in a position eccentric with respect to its said bearingmeans.

5. Av convertible non-circular toy gear-unit for coaction with other similar gears of a toy gearset and including in combination: a gear having substantially radially-projecting integral teeth arranged on a non-circular pitch-line and provided within the confines thereof with a substantially-continuous non-circular clearance-opening for theY reception of a guide-stud or the like and. extending through the gear from face to face, the said clearance-opening having a lateral boundary-surface ,of less peripheral length than the peripheral length of the non-circular pitch-line of the gear and extending in substantial parallelism therewith; a pair of removable and replaceable centering-members each provided substantially centrally with bearing-means, the said centering-members being attachable to the said gear and extendable respectively across the opposite ends of the clearance-opening therein to convert the gear for rotation about substantially its center; and two eccentric-drive means respectively carried by the said centering-members and positioned thereon eccentrically with respect to the bearing-means of the given centeringmember.

6. A convertible non-circular toy gear-unit for coaotion with other similar gears of a toy gearset and including in combination: a gear having substantially radially-projecting integral teeth arranged on a non-circular pitch-line and provided within the cennes thereof with a noncircular clearance-opening for the reception of a guide-stud or the like and extending through the gear from face to face, the said gear being formed in its said clearance-opening with a stoprib providing an inwardly-facing boundarysurface of less peripheral length than the peripheral length of the non-circular pitch-line of the gear and extending in substantial parallelism therewith; and a removable and replaceable centering-member provided substantially cen-'- trally with bearing-means, the said centeringmember being attachable to the saidvgear and extendable across the clearance-opening therein to convert the gear for rotation about substanl tially its center.

LEONARD W. COLE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of recordy in the fue of this patent:

UNI'I'ED STATES PA'I'ENTS

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Classifications
U.S. Classification434/401, D19/64, 74/437, 446/236
International ClassificationF16H55/08, F16H35/02, G09B25/02, A63H33/04
Cooperative ClassificationF16H2035/003, F16H35/02, F16H55/084, A63H33/042, G09B25/02
European ClassificationA63H33/04B, F16H55/08G, F16H35/02, G09B25/02