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Publication numberUS2477825 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1949
Filing dateJun 10, 1947
Priority dateJun 10, 1947
Publication numberUS 2477825 A, US 2477825A, US-A-2477825, US2477825 A, US2477825A
InventorsRichardson Jesse W
Original AssigneeRichardson Jesse W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Peg scoreboard
US 2477825 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Aug. 2, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PEG SCOREBOARD Jesse W. Richardson, Philadelphia, Pa.

Application June 10, 1947, Serial No. 153,789

Claims.

This invention relates to a score board and more particularly relates to a universal peg score board which is particularly adapted to keep secore for any of numerous card games which are scored in a difierent manner from each other.

An object of this invention is to provide a peg score board which provides means for keeping the score of any one of numerous card games which have different methods of scoring.

Another object of my invention is the provision of a score board in which sockets for the reception of the pegs for indicating the scores for four players are so grouped that the score of each player can readily be counted by the positions of a peg or pegs in the section allotted to an individual player or to partners.

Another object of my invention is to provide a plurality of groups of sockets in each section, each comprising groups of columns spaced from each other, as well as groups of rows in the columns separated from each other, each row being designated by a numeral from 1-0 between two groups of columns of sockets, thus providing a group of columns of sockets on each side of the designating numerals for two types of scores in the players allotted section.

Referring to the drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of the kit when the cover is in position for scoring;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view on the line 22 of Fig. 1; and

Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view on the line 33 of Fig. 1 with the cover reversed from the position shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

In the drawings, the reference character Ill designates the container having a bottom l2, side members l4, end members It and I8 and a cover 20.

The cover is provided with a tongue 22 along each side edge which is spaced intermediate the faces thereof and are arranged to slide in grooves 22 in the side members I4, one face of the cover is provided with a series of peg sockets 24 for scoring as hereinafter described.

The container or box is of a size to receive several decks of playing cards 30 in a cover or covers as well as a peg holder 32 having sockets for the reception of th reduced ends of pegs 34 used for seating in the sockets 24 in one face of the cover 20 to indicate the score.

The pegs may be of various colors or other difl'erentiating means designating dilferent values or different players.

When a game'is in progress the cover may be removed from the container or reversed in the grooves as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the container forming a support or stand for the score board to elevate the board above the table.

The arrangement of the sockets in the score board is such as to provide four sections N, E, W and S with an arrow pointing toward each section, each section comprising six longitudinal columns of sockets each having ten transverse rows of sockets.

The columns designate units, tens, hundreds, thousands, tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands and may be read in either direction with relation to the-longitudinal center of the board. I preferably number the rows in the columns 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 0, using all the digits in sequence and preferably provide a space between the hundreds and thousands columns for numbering the rows and also preferably provide a space between rows 5 and 6 so that the values indicated by the placed pegs can readily be ascertained.

When the board is specifically marked for a cribbage score board, an arrow points upwardly at the bottom of each of the units, hundreds and tens of thousands columns of sections S and W while similar arrows pointdownwardly from above the tens, thousands and hundreds of thousands columns of sections E and N to indicate the consecutive positioning of the pegs during the scoring, that is, up one column and down the next, in other words, counting is done upwardly in alternate columns of two sections and downwardly in the other columns.

When desired, the results of the positioned pegs in the different sections may be read across the rows. For example, a peg has been positioned in each of the six columns of section S designating a value of 122,430 when read from the longitudinal center of the board.

As above described, a value totaling 999,999 is indicated when a peg is placed in each socket in row 9 of any of the six columns of either of the sections N, E, S and W.

The numbering of the rows in sections N and W is the same as in the rows of sections S and E, but the arrows are in the reverse order.

It will be appreciated that, if desired, the numbering of the rows in sections N and W may be the reverse of those in sections E and S.

Cribbage The score board is provided with an additional socket at the end of the sixth column of sockets in sections E and S designated A, as well as a similar socket B at the end of the sixth column 3 of sections N and W to represent the final score of 121 when used for scoring cribbage.

When used for cribbage scoring, the dealer starting the game begins scoring from line 1 in the extreme right column in section S, while the opponent starts from the extreme left column from row 1 in section W, both scoring by moving their pegs from the outer to the inner rows, re-

the columns of numerals, while the indebtedness of the player to the potis indicated on the three columns on the other side of the column of numetals.

The advantages of my invention result from the provision of a game kit comprising a container having a reversible cover with score receiving versing the directions of movement of the pegs Bridge When using the score board for scoring bridge games, N and W sections are used by one team and E and S sections are used by the other team. Two sets of pegs, each diiiering in color or shape from the other, being used by each team, each player using pegs diil'ering from those of the other for indicating the score in the players section. The rubber scoring being indicated by placing a peg for each rubber won in the sockets below sections S and W.

To indicate side vulnerable, a peg should be placed in the socket immediately below the scorin sections S or W, or the sockets A and B used for indicating the score of 21 when playin cribbage.

Gin Rummy When playing gin rummy, one contestant, say contestant A, scores on section S, the other, say B, on section W. The scores are indicated on the three columns at the right of the numerals des ignating the rows, while the boxes are scored on the three columns at the left of the numerals. A score of nine hundred and ninety-nine can be indicated on the three scoring columns and the 'same number can be indicated on each of the columns for scoring the boxes in each section.

For example, the pegs in section S show that contestant A has a score 430 and a total of 122 boxes when read from the longitudinal center of the board.

The scoring for contestant B would be designated by pegs in a similar manner. h

Rummy is scored in the same manner as gin rummy only no box score is made.

Pinochle In pinochle, the scoring is the same as in gin rummy, one set of partners scoring on section S, the other set scoring on section W. The scoring being indicated on the same columns as in gin rummy, while minus scoring is indicated in the three columns at the left of the numerals.

A three handed game can be played by the third party using section E for scoring.

Poker The score of a two, three or four handed game of poker can be scored on the board, each player scoring on a section E, S, W or N.

The indebtedness of the pot to the player being indicated on the three columns on one side of peg sockets in one face, space in the container for several decks of cards and a removable holder for a plurality of scoring pegs of difierent characteristics such as shapes, size or color, each being provided with a stem adapted to seat'in any or the sockets for indicating the score of players or contestants of various card games.

Another advantage or my invention results from the provision of a score board divided into four sections, each section being designated for an individual player, each section being divided into at least two sections each having three columns of ten rows each.

What I claim and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

l. A universal score board for keeping score for card games which are scored in a difierent manner from each other, said board being divided into four equal scoring sections spaced from each other, each section being provided with six parallel, longitudinal columns of ten sockets each, said sockets being in ten transverse rows parallel to each other, indicia on the board successively numbering the rows, 1, 2, 3, e, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and a, there being a relatively wide longitudinal and a relatively wide transverse space extending from a central space separating the four sections from each other, four designating arrows in the central space, each section having one of the designating characters N, E, S and W, to each of which an arrow is pointed.

2. A universal score board for keeping score for card games which are scored in a difierent manner from each other, said board bein divided into four equal scoring section spaced from each other, each section being provided with six par allel, longitudinal columns of ten sockets each, said sockets being in ten transverse row parallel to each other, indicia, on the board successively numbering the rows 1, 2, 3, a, 5, 6, Z, 8, 9 and 0, there being a relatively wide longitudinal and a relatively wide transverse space extending from a central space separating the four section from each other, four designating arrows in th central space, each section having one of the designating characters N, E, S and W, to each of which an arrow is pointed, the sections E and S being positioned end to end forming one pair of sections which may be combined for scoring, the other sections N and W also being positioned end to end forming a second pair of sections which may be combined for scoring, the columns of sockets of each pair of sections being in alignment with each other.

3. A universal score board for keeping score for card games which are scored in a difierent manner from each other, said board being divided into four equal scoring sections spaced from each other. each section,,being provided with six parallel longitudinal columns of ten sockets each, said sockets being in ten transverse rows parallel to each other, indicia on the board successively numbering the rows 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 0,

there being a relatively wide longitudinal and a relatively wide transverse space extending from a central space separating the four sections from each other, four designating arrows in the central space, each section having one of the designating characters N, E, S and W, to each of which an arrow is pointed, the sections E and S being positioned end to end forming one pair of sections which may be combined for scoring, the other sections N and W also being positioned end to end forming a second pair of sections which may be combined for scoring, the columns of sockets of each pair of sections being in alignment with each other, arrows at the ends of the columns of each pair of sections indicating the movement of the pegs during scoring of certain games.

4. A universal score board for keeping score for card games which are scored in a different manner from each other, said board being divided into four equal scoring sections spaced from each other, each section being provided with six parallel, longitudinal columns of ten sockets each, said sockets being in ten transverse rows parallel to each other, indicia on the board successively numbering the rows 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 0, there being a relatively wide longitudinal and a relatively wide transverse space extending from a central space separating the four sections from each other, four designating arrows in the central space, each section having one of the designating characters N, E, S and W, to each of which an arrow i pointed, the sections E and S being positioned end to end forming one pair of sections which may be combined for scoring, the other sections N and W also being positioned end to end forming a second pair of sections which may be combined for scoring, the columns of sockets of each pair of sections being in alignment with each other, arrows at the ends of the columns of numbering the rows 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, '7, 8, 9 and 0,

there being a relatively wide longitudinal and a relatively wide transverse space extending from a central space separating the four sections from each other, four designating arrows in the central space, each section having one of the designating characters N, E, S and W, to each of which an arrow is pointed, the sections E and S being positioned end to end forming one pair of sections which may be combined for scoring, the other sections N and W also being positioned end to end forming a second pair of sections which may be combined for scoring, the columns of sockets of each pair of sections bein in alignment with each other, there being an additional row of sockets at one end of the columns of a pair of sections spaced from the last row of sockets in the adjacent section.

JESSE W. RICHARDSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 321,509 LeCount July 7, 1885 375,558 Massa Dec. 27, 1887 648,814 Trewartha May 1, 1900 766,545 Sterl Aug. 2, 1904 1,039,485 Bigger Sept. 24, 1912

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US321509 *Jan 29, 1885Jul 7, 1885 Cribbage-board
US375558 *Dec 27, 1887 massa
US648814 *Sep 13, 1899May 1, 1900William TrewarthaCombined card-case and game-counter.
US766545 *Mar 30, 1904Aug 2, 1904Otto A SterlCard-case and counter.
US1039485 *Jul 1, 1911Sep 24, 1912James Goldie BiggarCounter.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2539765 *Mar 29, 1947Jan 30, 1951Eleanor WoldEducational toy
US3051490 *Feb 24, 1959Aug 28, 1962John H NewmanCounting boards
US4332386 *Sep 2, 1980Jun 1, 1982Townsend Richard JEuchre score board
US5620099 *Nov 28, 1994Apr 15, 1997Bickett; Earl H.Combined portable scoring system and storage/carrier unit
US5868390 *Oct 22, 1996Feb 9, 1999Ripley; David R.Game board and method of manufacture
US8677924May 3, 2011Mar 25, 2014Willie L. BrownScorekeeper board
US20120282988 *Jul 17, 2012Nov 8, 2012Martens Philip SCribbage card game and pegging board
WO1990010480A1 *Mar 13, 1990Sep 20, 1990Arthur Henry Price''bridgemate'' bridge scoring device
Classifications
U.S. Classification235/90, 116/222, 273/148.00A
International ClassificationA63F1/00, A63F1/18
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/18
European ClassificationA63F1/18