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Publication numberUS2479017 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1949
Filing dateJan 16, 1945
Priority dateJan 16, 1945
Publication numberUS 2479017 A, US 2479017A, US-A-2479017, US2479017 A, US2479017A
InventorsMerson David A, Moritt Irving J
Original AssigneeMoritt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hand sewing instrument
US 2479017 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v- 1949- D. A. MERSON ET AL HAND SEWING INSTRUMENT 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 16, 1945 NVENIORS' I I 1m ATTOR Yfi 1949- D. A. MERSON ET AL 2,479,017

HAND SEWING INSTRUMENT 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 16, 1945 A ug. 16, 1-949. x D. A. MERSON ET AL- 2,479,017

HAND SEWING INSTRUMENT 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Jan. 16, 1945 ama . grips 7 tion.

" This isan ordinary straight Patented Aug. 16, 1949 p ,HAND SEWING INSTRUlVIENT David A. Mei-son, Great Neck, and Irving J.

Moritt, ,to said Moritt Brooklyn, N. Y.; said Merson assignor Application January 16, 1945, Serial No. 573,030

The invention is a hand sewing machine of the kind which is held in the hand when being used and operated by squeezing and releasing a pair of plier-ty-pe handgrips, the purpose being to improve the practicability of instruments of this kind as well as to reduce their manufacturing cost so that their special utility can be made more generally available.

The accompanying drawing exemplifies the invention in the form at present preferred, Fig. 1 being a perspective; Fig. 2, a side elevation with parts in section and in the upstroke position; Fig. 3, a similar view in the downstroke position; Fig. 4, an end view with the looper case in section; Fig. 5, a top plan of the looper case; Fig. 6, a section on line 66 of Fig. 4; Fig. 7 is a vertical sec- .tion on line of Fig. 4 through the table member; Figs. 8 and 9 are plans representin successive positions of the oscillating shuttle; Fig. 10 is a front view in enlarged scale of the stitch adjustment, and Fig. 11 is aside view of Fig. 10 partly in section.

The two handgrip levers, I and 2, cross each other and are fulcrummed together at their crossing point 3. The needle bar 4 and the work-table base, areeach pivotally connected to each handgrip by two pivot pins, namely the pins 6 and I in front of the fulcrum and the pivot pins 8 and 9 in rear of it, and the latter pins work in slots the needle bar and table All four pivot pins are formed respectively in members as indicated. equally distant from the fulcrum which embrace the rear pivots 8 and 9 are parallel to each other so that the operation of the handcauses the bar and table members to approach and recede from each other with a straight line motion, being always parallel to each other. Also, they approach with a powerful action due to the compounding of the leverage.

The two handgrips are hollow sheet-metal stampings shaped to fit the hand comfortably and both are shown as housing springs In, appropriately fastened to them so as to pull on the ends "of the needle bar and table base, respectively, thus urging the parts to their open or upstroke posi- The needle bar 4 carries the needle II at its extreme end, held thereon in an appropriate socket l2, and fixed therein by a thumb screw 13.

sewing machine needle, and when secured in the socket, is exactly perpendicular to the needle bar, which is to say,

: parallel to the line of approach of this barto the work-table. The needle bar'also 3 and the slots carries the work F Claims. (01. 112-169) feed-actuating cam l4 and the take-u l5, as well as the looper-actuating stud I6, presently described.

Thread is supplied to the needle from a spool, which is an ordinary spool, housed in a spool chamber inside of the handgrip -l, and mounted to turn therein on a spindle I! carried, on the spool-holder cap [8, which is screwed on or otherwise removably attached to the end of the handgrip so as to close the spool chamber. In threading up, the thread drawn from the spool is first slipped sidewise through'the slot l9 (Fig. 1) into the handgrip outlet hole 20, and is thence led under the adjustable tension dis 2| through a fixedeye 22, through the eye in the take -up i5 and the second fixed eye 23, and thence to the needle. As will be apparent, manipulating the screw on the tension device 21 varies the spring pressure on the disc 2| soas to adapt the tension of the thread to the particular sewing conditions. Where the thread overlies the handgrip it is covered by a rigid shield 24 so that the pressure of the hand will not affect the tension.

The take-up I5 is mounted to rock and reciprocate in an aperture in the needle bar, being held therein by a slot and pin mounting 25, and is actuated in the present case by an extension 26 from the handgrip 2, integral therewith. It descends thereby releasing the tension on the thread when the handgrips close (Fig. 3),and rises to restore the tension when they open, at thesame time drawing more thread from the spool wherewith to feed thread for the next stitch, its action being in all respects similar to that of customary take-ups.

The work-table 21 affords a. smooth flat surface to support the fabric being sewed and'is shown ceive the point of the needle and allow it to enter into the looper chamber below.

This looper chamber is a round-bottomed cupshaped case 28, made as shallow as circumstances permit, and is pivoted on the base 5 on a screw 29, which can be the same screw that locks the Work-table plate in its slot as shown. It is held in its working position by a ball-detent 30 and by swinging it on its pivot (the needle being elevated), its interior is quickly exposed for access. In the case of a single-thread or chain-stitch sewing instrument, this case may contain merely a simple looper, as used in single-thread sewin machines, but for lock-stitchor double-thread.

3| containing a bobbin 32. The shuttle, as shown, is the ordinary oscillating type which is a conventional article, well understood, and does not require to be described except .to say that in the present case, it is oscillated by a cord-operated drum 33 instead of by the usual shuttle holder. This drum is rotated on a stud 34 fixed in the bottom of the :case, by'thelpullpf a cord 35, and--is-returned=after being so rotate'd,:=by the action of a helical spring contained within it. The cord 35 is pulled out by one arm, 36, o'fia bell crank lever of which the other-,-arn1,..3,7,i,i s operated by a lost motion link 38 from the shuttle actuator stud [6, already mentioned.

It will be understood that the needle is caused 1 to pierce the fabric on the Work-table 21, by the closing of the handgrips,,and that ewhenritehas entered the shuttle case and started to withdraw on its reverse or upstroke, a loop is formed in :the then untensioned thread, at the side of the nee- ;dle. The looper pointrw; of the oscillatingshuttle gpieksinto; this-loop, and draws: it around the shuttle and around the bobbin 32 therein and there- (fore around thethread extending from theibo Join, this beingalso theconventionalaction of .{lQCkeStitChl sewing mechanism in the formation of .,-a.stitch. in the caseof .a single-threadinxstrument a looper withoutrany bobbimis similar- {1 generated-by the cor-depulled,spring returned drum 33 to form ;a ichain-stitch of the single 'athl'fild. ;In. -:any case the'lost motion represented .;by the-slotted link v 38 results in the proper timing @fithelooperxso that it picks up theloop .on the return rmotion :produced .by the action of the spring. The particular meansof actuating the -'drnmeorqthe cord,a;.with the required; lost :motion, is obviously capable of-lmechanical variation-from that shown abut is preferably located on theside of the table base as indicated.

fiber-instrument is used by inserting the workitable underthe goods .tobe sewed, and so asto ,ententhe latter; under a spring-type pressure foot 40. This comprises essentially a fiat spring finger depending from theend of a small-shelf pro- .:-,=J'ectin g-from the base part over the work-table, 'i fl lviunction istof-hold the fabric in continuou s contact-'withvthe table. and against being rlittedibmthe needle or ,bythe fabrici -j e d. ;Its pressuresiseadjustabletby means of the screweand slot 4 2 byx whic-h it, is attacheduto the-shelf.

While [the .length-of stitch can beeasily-l controlled bythe rate at Which the instrument. is manuallyaadvanced relatively .tothe goods, the instrument includes an automatic feed Inechanism operated by the=relative movement of-the v,needle tbar-v and; table members. I As ;shown, more particul-arly inlFigsMlO and ll but without limitation atogthe design there showrnthe feedincludes a :olaw foot 43 with a-serratedi bottom to engage the goods. .It isl pivoted' at: 4.4 to the loweron the shelf 4| and has arear upstanding, crank ai man-which is=pivoted to' and" supports the feed Qlever-AS. 'Thefulcrum of this lever-is asl-iding efulcrum constituted by a-,-pivot EOlateraIIy-Lpmjecting from -a- ;vertica1- slide 5 I which is adapted to be raised or'lowered by the adjustment of: the :scre w; 5;2 engaging a 1 notch in; the-slide, :by its flat t'head;as-indicatedtin -Flig. 11. :The feed-lever 49 .iis-slotted. to-enga ethe .pivct'fiil and its upper rend is engagedin a oamvgroove in the-actuator tdmnwthelneedle bar 5, already: referred ,to.

hen theneedlezbarsadescends; the camygroove ieswingsither-feedlever-491-in the direction stoxpush it thezfee'd; claw; f or-walid;.:or: to the; left finlEig. 1 10, at

the same time pressing it downwardly upon the goods, so that it pushes the goods along the distance of one stitch. When the bar rises, the lower end of the feed lever swings in the oppo- 5 site or backwards direction. It first lifts the claw about its pivot 44 and then encounters a lug 5la on the supporting link 45, thus disengaging it 'rfromatheggoods. Thereuponxit swingsgthe lifted claw and"theblirik togeth'er lto .thellim-it of its rearward motion, whereupon it repeats the cycle to :make the next feeding stroke. Changing the ele- ..va,tion,of the fulcrum 50 relative to the feed lever49 obviously changes the length of the stroke 'iandlhence Marissa-the length of the stitch produced From the-foregoing description it will be apparent that by si nply using the handgrips in a normal manner goods can be sewed with uniform astitching and in situations where the toughness of the goods or their location, or some other considerations -;wou-l;dtinake impractical .the useof a y-hand heldyneedletor astationarymachine. The =instrumentx is readily replenished .with thread. This lesions, by swinging-the looperlcasefrom un- :der the work-table, -,thu s .exposing "the shuttle, th n removingthehobbin from Itheshuttle and substituting. another .in its ,place and of course also by opening the -spooll,charnber,and substituting, a new. spool for theempty, one. The shiftingiofsthe looper case is done withoutiderangingithe looper driveibecausetofthe flexible lloopenoperating ,connection repres ented in this exempli-fication y the-looper cord.

*We claim:

.1. A handsewingrinstrument,comprising a,pair ,of ;-crossing handgrip levers "-fulcrumed to, each :pther at their crossing point,;needle bar..and.,base t members respe etively pivotally. supported. on said handgrip ,levers each r on pivots :in'. front .of, ,and

roin rear oi, .the. fulcrum whereby said members have astraightmath: approachlto eaclrother, a straight needle fixed to said needlebar, an oscilalating looper., rnountedon said ,tablemernber to cooperate ,withrthe needle to .lform a stitch, and -rneans wfor ;os ci ll ating saidlooper comprising a rotary drun1,;a springcontained within thedrum ior rotating thedooper insone direction of oscil- 'JQtiOn-q-QIIId reconnection ,between-a handgripl levenand aid .drum tor rotating it; inithe opp site gggdirection. I t

2 s sewing instrumentpomprising a, pair '-.Of crossing i lrandgrip levers Qiulcrumed to each other atl-their- .crossing point,: needle bar and table mernbers respectively ,pivotally supported on ,said .handgripdevers zeach on pivots inifront of, and in rear of, \the fulcrum whereby l-said members iapproach ieach other ina straight path, a .straightneedle, fixedtoisaid needle bar, a[ looper mounted; intsaid table; membereto cooperate with :0 the needle, and means for oscillating said looper comprising a g-drnm .-member,- an operating connect-ionwherebyclosing movementof the-levers rotates :the drum-tin one direction and a spring tcontained within the drum for-oppfisitely rotating i, the drum .,during the opening movement, of said levers.

3. A hand sewing instrument comprising ;a;pair :of crossing .1 handgrip levers rctulcrumed ,to 7 each 0th61't53t theirgcrossingpoint, needle :bar and 7.0 table :members respectively pivotally supported ion-said; handgrip levers :eaoh :-.;on;piv 0ts in z'cront, .iandainrearaof, the fulcrnmwvhereby said memsbers approach reach 101711611111 ;a straight :path, a. istraightaneedlezfixedntossaidaneedle bar,zaalooper 7:5:in saidetablamember, a'rotarysdrum ixfor operating said looper, a cord for operating said drum in one direction, a spring for operating it in the other direction and an operating connection between said cord and one lOf said handgrips.

4. A hand sewing instrument comprising a pair of crossing handgrip levers fulcrumed to each other at their crossing point, needle bar and table members respectively pivotally supported thereon each on pivots in front of, and in rear of, the fulcrum whereby said members approach each other in a straight path, one of said handgrip levers being hollow andforming a spool chamber and provided with a removable closure for such chamber to confine a spool therein, a straight needle fixed on the needle bar and receiving thread from said spool and. a looper in the table member operated by relative movement of said handgrip levers.

5. A hand sewing instrument comprising a pair of cross handgrip levers fulcrumed to each other at their crossing point, needle bar and table members respectively pivotally supported on such levers each on pivots in front of, and in rear of, the fulcrum thereof whereby said members have a straight path of approach, one of said handgrip levers being hollow and constituting a spool chamber, a closure removably applied to said lever to confine a spool in said chamber, a straight needle fixed on the needle bar and receiving thread from said spool and an oscillating looper in the base member operated by the relative movement of said handgrip levers to form a stitch.

6. A hand sewing instrument comprising a pair of crossing handgrip levers fulcrumed to each other at their crossing point, needle bar and table members respectively pivotally supported on said handgrip levers each on pivots in front of, and in rear of, the fulcrum whereby said members approach each other in a straight path, and a straight needle fixed to said needle bar, said table member including a table proper and a looper case movably mounted thereunder, an oscillating looper mounted in said movable case to cooperate with said needle when the case 00- L,

cupies its normal position, and a flexible operating connection between said looper and one of said handgrip levers.

7. A hand sewing instrumentcomprising a pair of crossing handgrip levers fulcrumed to each other at their crossing point, needle bar and table members respectively pivotally supported on said handgrip levers each on pivots in front of, and in rear of, the fulcrum whereby said members have a straight path approach, said table member including a work-supporting plate and a cup-shaped looper case normally covered thereby, means for mounting said case so that it can be moved to an uncovered position with respect to said plate, a looper mounted in said case, a flexible operating connection between said looper and one of the handgrips and a straight needle fixed on th needle bar to cooperate with said looper to form a stitch.

6 8. A hand sewing instrument comprising a pair of crossing handgrip squeeze levers fulcrumed at their crossing point, needle bar and work table base members respectively pivotally supported on 7 said handgrips each on pivots in front of, and

in rear of, the fulcrum thereby providing parallel motion connections between both said handgrip levers and each of said members maintaining said members in parallelism as they are moved toward and from each other in a straight path approach, 'a straight needle fixed on the bar member, means on one of the handgrips adapted to confine a spool for supplying the needle with thread, and an oscillating shuttle carried in the work-table base member and containing a bobbin to folrm a lock-stitch with the thread from said spoo 9. A hand sewing instrument comprising a pair of crossing handgrip levers fulcrumed to each other at their crossing point, needle bar and table members respectively pivotally supported thereon each on pivots in front of, and in rear of, the fulcrum whereby said members approach each other in a straight path, one of said handgrip levers being hollow and forming a spool chamber and provided with a removable closure for such chamber to confine a spool therein and with a shield overlying the handgrip and the thread path, a straight needle fixed on the needle bar and receiving thread from said spool and a looper in the table member operated by relative movement of said handgrip levers.

l0. A hand sewing instrument comprising a pair of crossing handgrip squeeze levers fulcnumed at their crossing point, needle bar and work-table members respectively pivotally supported on said handgrips each on pivots in front of, and. in rear of, the fulcrum thereby providing parallel motion connections between both said handgrip levers and each of said members maintaining said members in parallelism as they are moved toward and from each other in a straight path approach, the handgrips housing springs fastened thereto and to the respective members to return them to open position, a straight needle on the bar aligned with such approach, means for conducting thread to the needle and a looper carried in the table member for cooperating with said needle to form a stitch.

DAVID A. MERSON. IRVING J. MORITT.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record n file of this patent: 1 the Germany Apr. 23, 1917

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US306996 *Oct 21, 1884 Baebee
US921426 *Dec 29, 1908May 11, 1909Daniel J BradyLeather-sewing machine.
*DE297534C Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2729177 *Jan 14, 1953Jan 3, 1956Dennison Mfg CoTag attaching device
US2928363 *Feb 7, 1958Mar 15, 1960SaltzPortable hand operated sewing device
US3127859 *Feb 29, 1960Apr 7, 1964Bernard SaltzHand operated button stitching sewing machine
US4406237 *May 13, 1981Sep 27, 1983Janome Sewing Machine Co. Ltd.Suturing instrument for surgical operation
US4414908 *Nov 26, 1980Nov 15, 1983Janome Sewing Machine Co. Ltd.Suturing machine for medical treatment
US4417532 *Jun 5, 1981Nov 29, 1983Janome Sawing Machine Industry Co., Ltd.Suturing instrument for surgical operation
US4501211 *Sep 30, 1982Feb 26, 1985Kabushiki Kaisha Niida SeisakushoLock stitch type hand sewing machine
US5694871 *Mar 18, 1996Dec 9, 1997Tippmann Pneumatics, Inc.Manually operated stitcher
DE1239654B *Aug 24, 1953May 3, 1967Bornand W & Leuthold AVorrichtung zum Befestigen von flexiblen Bindeorganen, z. B. Faeden, an Flaechengebilden, insbesondere Textilien
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/169
International ClassificationD05B81/00
Cooperative ClassificationD05B81/00
European ClassificationD05B81/00