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Publication numberUS2482778 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 27, 1949
Filing dateMar 4, 1944
Priority dateMar 4, 1944
Publication numberUS 2482778 A, US 2482778A, US-A-2482778, US2482778 A, US2482778A
InventorsJoerren Ernest A
Original AssigneeSpecialties Dev Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid pressure medium dispensing system
US 2482778 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S p 7, 1949. E. A; JOERREN 2,482,778

FLUID PRESSURE MEDIUM DISPENSING SYSTEM Filed March 4, 1944 50 Y :l L 1-:

1 101 anucnfoz 1 3 g] IrneJ'tJZJoerzv-erg,

attorney Patented Sept. 27, 1949 FLUID PRESSURE MEDIUM DISPENSING SYSTEM Ernest A. Joerren, Brooklyn, N. Y., assignor to Specialties Development Corporation, Bloomfield, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application March 4, 1944, Serial No. 525,122

7 Claims. (Cl. 62-1) The present invention relates to fluid pressure medium dispensing systems, and more particularly to systems for dispensing liquid carbon dioxide having a relatively low temperature.

Liquid carbon dioxide generally is stored in,

metallic containers known as cylinders. When the cylinders are subjected to low temperatures, such as are encountered in artic regions or at high altitudes in the flight of aircraft on which the cylinders are used, the vapor pressure of the carbon dioxide within the cylinders is greatly lowered. Liquid carbon dioxide is also stored in large capacity containers wherein it is maintained at low temperature and a correspondingly low vapor pressure. For example, where the liquid carbon dioxide is maintained at or is subjected to a temperature of about 40 F. the vapor pressure thereof is about 131 pounds per square inch (gauge).

It has been found that at such low temperatures, the correspondingly low pressure of the carbon dioxide in the containers will not effect rapid discharge of the liquid carbon dioxide therefrom. This is disadvantageous, particularly in cases where the carbon dioxide is used for fire extinguishing purposes. In extinguishing fires, it is desirable to direct a large quantity of carbon dioxide to the location of the fire in a minimum period of time. l

The present invention aims to overcome the foregoing difliculties and disadvantages encountered in discharging liquid carbon dioxide havdischarge of liquid carbon dioxide stored in one or more containers. Another object is to provide a system, wherein the gaseous medium is also utilized to effect operation of valves and the like for releasing the carbon dioxide,

Another object is to discharge liquid carbon dioxide from a container at a uniform predetering a relatively low temperature, by introducing a gaseous medium having a substantial pressure into the containers at or about the time the carbon dioxide is to be discharged, whereby the pressure in the containers is substantially increased to facilitate rapid and eflective discharge. The

invention further contemplates utilizing the gase- I ous pressure medium for operating discharge control means, such as a valve, associated with the containers.

An object of the present invention is to provide a fluid pressure medium dispensing system pressure adapted to facilitate rapid and efiective discharge thereof.

Another object is to provide a system of the foregoing character wherein an auxiliary source mined rate over a wide range of temperatures.

A further object is to provide a system of the foregoing character which is simple and economical in construction and positive in operation. Other and further objects of the invention will be obvious upon an understanding of the illustrative embodiment about to be described, or will be indicated in the appended claims, and various advantages not referred to herein will occur to one skilled in the art upon employment of the invention in practice.

Preferred embodiments of the invention have been chosen for purposes of illustration and description and are shown in the accompanying drawing, forming a part-of the specification,

wherein:

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view, partly in section, of a system the invention, wherein liquid carbon dioxide is stored in a plurality of containers. Figure 2 is a diagrammatic view, partly in section, of a system illustrating another embodiment of the invention, wherein liquid carbon dioxide is stored at low temperatures in aninsulated container.

Referring more particularly to Figure 1 of the drawing, there is shown a system comprising one or any suitable number of containers III, of which two are shown for illustrative p rposes. The

containers I] may be metallic cylinders of standard construction and adaptedto contain liquid carbon dioxide at relatively high intemalpressure, and each-cylinder may be equipped with a suitable release device ll about to be described.

Each cylinder I0 is also equipped with the usual syphon tube I2 for withdrawing liquid carbon dioxide from the lower end of the cylinder and has its upper end secured to the release device ll, herein shown diagrammatically. Since the cylinders and release devices shown herein are substantially identical in construction, a description of one cylinder and its release device will sufflce.

In practice, the release device I I may comprise a valve casing or housing having an inlet chamber M in communication with the syphon tube of gaseous pressure medium is utilized to eflect and an outlet chamber II having a discharge illustrating an embodiment of conduit l6 connected thereto which is adapted to direct the carbon dioxide to its point of use. Intermediate the inlet and outlet chambers, an opening is provided with a valve seat for receiving a suitable valve disc or member Il serving as a discharge control means.

The valve member is adapted to be sealed against the valve seat by the pressure of the carbon dioxide in the container, or by a spring or the like (not shown). The valve member I! is adapted to be unseated by fluid pressure operable means such as a piston l9 disposed in a piston chamber 20 separated from the outlet chamber by a partition 2|. The valve member I! and piston l9 are operatively connected by a rod 22 extending through an aperture in the partition 2|.

The container is further provided with means for introducing a gaseous pressure medium into the vapor space, which may comprise a suitable inlet valve including a member 24 adapted'to be seated against and seal an inlet port by the pressure of the carbon dioxide in the container or by spring means (not shown). Since the present invention is not concerned with the specific type of valve to be utilized, a detailed description thereof is believed to be unnecessary.

The gaseous pressure medium is supplied from a suitable source 30 by a conduit 3| having a suitable control valve 32 therein; and a branch conduit 34 leading to the inlet valve. The gaseous pressure medium is also adapted to effect operation of the fluid pressure operable piston l9, and, to accomplish this, the conduit 3| or the branch conduit 34 is connected by a conduit 33 to the piston chamber 30. If desired a thermo-responsive pressure regulating valve 35 of suitable design may be connected in the conduit 3|, the purpose of which will be described hereinafter.

The source of gaseous pressure medium 30 may be a container in which is stored a compressed or liquefied gas having a much higher pressure than carbon dioxide at a relatively low temperature. Such gases may be air, argon, carbon monoxide,

helium, hydrogen, krypton, neon, nitrogen, and

oxygen or mixtures of any of these gases. Preferably, nitrogen or compressed air is utilized because of their comparative low cost and general availability.

Carbon dioxide may also be'utilized, provided it is maintained at temperatures at which it has a relatively high vapor pressure. To accomplish this, the source 30 may be heated in any suitable manner.

Referring now to Figure 2, there is shown a heat insulated container I of the bulk storage type for storing a large volume of liquid carbon dioxide which may be used for fire extinguishin pur-, poses and is maintained at relatively low temperatures by means .of a refrigerating coil 36 extending through the container, or by other suitable means.

The container has an outlet at its bottom vapor space of the container from a source 30 by means of a conduit 3|. The fluid pressure operable piston I9 is connected for operation by the gaseous pressure medium from the source 30 by means of a branch conduit 34 leading from the conduit 3| to the piston chamber 20'.

Insofar as the present invention is concerned, the systems illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, respectively, do not differ essentially. The system shown in Figure 1 is designed for storing and discharging liquid carbon dioxide which may be subjected to low temperature and resulting in ineffective discharge by being exposed to natural elements, while the system shown in Figure 2 normally closed by a valve member l1, constituting discharge controlling means, the valve member being adapted to be unseated by fluid pressure operable means. such as a piston l9 disposed in a piston chamber 20" and operatively connected to the valve member ll' by a rod 22' extending through a partition 2]. The outlet is adapted to be placed in communication with a discharge conduit 15 when the valve member l'l' is unseated. I

An inlet valve, illustrated as a valve member 24', is provided at the top of container Ill for is designed to overcome ineffective discharge in cases where the liquid carbon dioxide is stored and maintained at low temperatures by refrigerating means to accomplish other advantages, such as low pressure storage and increased snow forming ability. Thus, for the purpose of providing rapid and effective discharge at low temperature, the condition of the liquid carbon dioxide may be assumed to be the same in both systems.

For example, it is contemplated to discharge liquid carbon dioxide at temperatures between about 20 F. and the triple point of carbon dioxide, namely 69.88 F. At such temperatures, the vapor pressure of the stored carbon dioxide is relatively low as compared with the vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at normal atmospheric temperature, for example, at about F. Consequently, the discharge rate of the carbon dioxide is substantially lower and the time required to discharge a given amount of carbon dioxide will be materially greater. By way of example, the vapor pressure of liquid carbon dioxide at various temperatures within the contemplated range and at normal atmospheric temperature is as follows:

In practicing the present invention, the pressure of the gaseous medium at the source 30 is such that, when it is introduced into the containers III or l0, the resulting pressure in the vapor space of the containers willbe between about 300 and about 1000 pounds per square inch. Preferably, the pressure established in the vapor space is in the neighborhood of 500 pounds per square inch, which pressure provides for rapid and efiective discharge of the carbon dioxide. It

, will be understood that any pressurabelow the safe working pressure of the containers may be established therein. For example, where the container is a high pressure steel cylinder (Figure 1), pressures up to about 3000 pounds per square inch may be established to discharge the carbon dioxide, while where the container is a low pressure bulk storage tank (Figure 2), a pressure of about 500 pounds per square inch may be safely established without damaging the container.

In connection with the system shown in Figure 1, where the temperature of the carbon dioxide may vary over a wide range, it is desirable to introducing a gaseous pressure medium into the regulate the pressure which is established within the container so that it is substantially uniform, regardless of whether the temperature is -40 or 20 F., for example. Thus, where it is desired to establish a discharge pressure of about 500 pounds per square inch, the thermo-responsive pressure regulating valve 35 is adjusted to introduce the gaseous medium at pressures adapted to establish such discharge pressure in the container at any temperature within the range the carbon dioxide may have. Consequently, the carbon dioxide can be discharged as rapidly and effectively at 60 F., for example, as it can be discharged at 20 F.

In connection with the system shown in Figure 2, the temperature of the carbon dioxide, preferably, is maintained constant, and the gaseous pressure medium is supplied at a constant pressure to provide a predetermined discharge rate.

In operation of the systems shown in Figures 1 and 2, the control valve 32 is operated manually or automatically, either locally or remotely, to release the gaseous pressure medium from the source (it. The gaseous pressure medium is directed to the piston. chamber 28 or 20 to perate the piston it or it and unseat the valve member I? or H. to thereby place the system in condition for discharge of the carbon dioxide through the discharge conduit 16 or iii. Substantially simultaneously with'the operation of the valve member ll or H, the gaseous pressure medium is introduced into the vapor space of the container to establish the desired discharge pressure which expels the liquid carbon dioxide from the container. I

From the foregoing description, it will be seen that the present invention provides systems for rapidly and effectively discharging liquid carbon dioxide having relatively low temperatures by utilizing an auxiliary gaseous pressure medium at a high pressure and stored in a separate container. Uniform predetermined discharge pressures are adapted to be established thus providing a high predetermined ,rate of discharge of the carbon dioxide at low temperatures.

The systems in accordance with the present invention are simple and economical to manufacture and are readily operated to accomplish the advantages described herein.

'As various changes may be made in the form,

' construction and arrangement of the parts herein, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and without sacrificing any of its advantages, it is to be understood that all matter herein is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in any limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements oi." the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

I claim:

1. In a fluid pressure medium dispensing system wherein liquid carbon dioxide is stored, the combination of a container for storing the liquid carbon dioxide having an inlet and outlet means in fluid flow communication with the lower interior art of said container, a pressure medium operable valve for controlling the discharge of carbon dioxide through said outlet means, a source of high pressure fluid medium in gaseous form, and means for conducting the medium to said valve to operate the same and for conducting the medium to said inlet to introduce the medium into said container, whereby the valve is condi- I 6 tioned to permit discharge of carbon dioxide through said outlet means and the carbon dioxide in said container is subjected to a higher pressure than its own to expel the same therefrom at a more rapid rate.

2. In a fluid pressure medium dispensing system wherein liquid carbon dioxide is stored, the combination of a container for storing the liquid carbon dioxide having an inlet and outlet means in fluid flow communication with the lower interior part of said container, a pressure medium operable valve for controlling the discharge of carbon dioxide through said outlet means, a source of high pressure gaseous medium, means for conducting the medium to said valve to opcrate the same and for conducting the medium to said inlet to introduce the medium into said container, whereby the valve is conditioned to permit discharge of carbon dioxide through said outlet means and the carbon dioxide in said con vided 'for each outlet means .to control the disv charge of carbon dioxide therethrough, a source of high pressure gaseous medium, and means for conducting the medium to each valve to operate the same and for conducting the medium to said each inlet to introduce the medium into said containers, whereby the valves are conditioned to permit discharge of carbon dioxide through said outlet means and the carbon dioxide in said containers is subjected to a higher pressure than its own to expel the same therefrom at a more rapid rate.

4. In a fluid pressure medium dispensing system wherein liquid carbon dioxide is stored, the combination of a plurality of containers for storing the liquid carbon dioxide each having an inlet and outlet means in fluid flow communication with the lower interior part of said container, pressure medium operable valves, one being provided for each outlet means to control the discharge of carbon dioxide therethrough, a, source of high pressure gaseous medium, means for conducting the medium to each valve to operate the same and for conducting the medium to said each inlet to introducethe medium into said con the liquid carbon dioxide'having an inlet and outlet means in fluid flow communication with the lower interior part of said container, refrigerating means for maintaining the carbon dioxide at a below normal atmospheric temperature and its corresponding pressure, a pressure medium operable valve for controlling the discharge of carbon dioxide through said outlet means, a source of high pressure gaseous medium, and means for conducting the medium to said valve to operate the same and ior conducting the medium to said inlet to introduce the medium into said container, whereby the valve is conditioned to permit discharge oi carbon dioxide through said outlet means and the carbon dioxide in said container is subjected to a higher pressure than its own to expel the same therefrom at a more rapid rate.

6. In a fluid pressure medium dispensing system wherein liquid carbon dioxide is stored, the combination of a container for storing the liquid carbon dioxide having an inlet and outlet means in fluid flow communication with the lower interior part of said container, a pressure medium operable valve for controlling the discharge of carbon dioxide through said outlet means, a, source of high pressure gaseous medium, means for conducting the medium to said valve to operate the same and for conducting the medium to said inlet to introduce the medium into said container, whereby the valve is conditioned to permit discharge of carbon dioxide through said outlet means and the carbon dioxide in said contamer is subjected to a higher pressure than its own to expel the same therefrom at a more rapid rate, and a check valve in said inlet maintained in closed position by the pressure of the carbon dioxide in said container and adapted to be opened by the pressure of the high pressure gaseous medium.

7. In a fluid pressure medium dispensing sys- 8 tem wherein liquid carbon dioxide is stored, the

' combination'of a container for storing the liquid carbon dioxide having an inlet and outlet means in fluid flow communication with the lower interior part of said container, a normally closed valve for controlling the discharge of carbon dioxide through said outlet means, pressure medium actuated means for controlling the operation of said valve, a source of high pressure fluid medium in gaseous form, and means for conducting the medium to said pressure actuated means to operate the same and for conduct g the medium to said inlet to introduce the medi into said container, whereby the valve is conditioned to permit discharge of carbon dioxide through said outlet means and the carbon dioxide in said container is subject to a higher pressure than its own to expel the same therefrom at a more rapid rate.

ERNEST A. JOERREN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the idle of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,264,390 Hamilton Apr. '30, 1918 2,143,311 Geertz' Jan. 10, 1939 2,307,784 Mapes Jan. 12, 194:3v 2,352,627 Grant July 4, 1944

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2563385 *Jan 7, 1947Aug 7, 1951 Apparatus fok cleaning beek
US2668419 *Oct 26, 1951Feb 9, 1954Specialties Dev CorpFluid carbon dioxide composition
US2753856 *Dec 7, 1951Jul 10, 1956Phillips Petroleum CoLiquefied petroleum gas fuel valve
US2780899 *Dec 19, 1951Feb 12, 1957Process Engineering IncApparatus for filling a fire extinguisher
US3053054 *Jan 23, 1961Sep 11, 1962Boudet Et CieInstallation for the expansion of a liquefied gas
US3092972 *Oct 22, 1958Jun 11, 1963Union Carbide CorpLight weight liquid helium control system
US3097500 *Aug 21, 1961Jul 16, 1963 Temperature control system
US3151640 *Feb 26, 1960Oct 6, 1964Union Carbide CorpLiquid gas distribution apparatus
US3329156 *Jun 12, 1964Jul 4, 1967Pursifull Elmer CBeverage dispensing system
US4674662 *Jun 11, 1985Jun 23, 1987Ambience, Inc.Dispenser for bottled liquid
US4761961 *May 29, 1987Aug 9, 1988Messer, Griesheim GmbhProcedure for removal of low-boiling refrigerants from refrigerative and air-conditioning units
US4977747 *Sep 8, 1989Dec 18, 1990L'air Liquide, Society Anonyme Pour L'etude Et L'exploitation Des Procedes Georges ClaudeProcess and container for supplying supercritical CO2
US5237824 *Feb 16, 1990Aug 24, 1993Pawliszyn Janusz BApparatus and method for delivering supercritical fluid
US5373702 *Jul 12, 1993Dec 20, 1994Minnesota Valley Engineering, Inc.LNG delivery system
US5850876 *Oct 7, 1996Dec 22, 1998Pyrozone Pty. Ltd.Apparatus and system for the storage and supply of liquid CO2 at low pressure for extinguishing of fires
US7069730Sep 2, 2003Jul 4, 2006Chart Inc.Liquid and compressed natural gas dispensing system
US20070102044 *Nov 4, 2005May 10, 2007Custom Ultrasonics, Inc.Disinfectant transfer system
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US20130200063 *Apr 18, 2011Aug 8, 2013Nestec S.A.Container with thermal management
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Classifications
U.S. Classification137/212, 62/46.1, 137/340, 222/399, 137/208, 222/400.7, 62/50.4
International ClassificationF17C7/00, F17C7/02
Cooperative ClassificationF17C7/02
European ClassificationF17C7/02