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Publication numberUS2484051 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1949
Filing dateSep 30, 1947
Priority dateSep 30, 1947
Publication numberUS 2484051 A, US 2484051A, US-A-2484051, US2484051 A, US2484051A
InventorsJr Robert Lash Robbins
Original AssigneeBradley Milton Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game board
US 2484051 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 11, 1949. R. ROBBINS, JR 2,484,051

GAME BOARD Filed Sept. 30, 1947 4 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. 05m 2" L. EOBBIN: J12.

w fbz fm Oct. 11, 1949,

Filed Sept. 30, 1947 R. L. ROBBINS, JR

GAME BOARD.

4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. 0352 T1 lPoziBms'Jz -1 W, aqhm ATTOEWEYSf' Oct. 11, 1949. R. ROBBINS, JR 2,434,051

' GAME BOARD 'Filed Sept. 30, 1947 4'Sheets-Sheet 5 NAME No.1-RED NAME. 7

NO. Z'BLACK PAR SCORE CARD 3 NAME. NAME NAME s-vreuow No.4-PURPLF. Nos-BLUE.

PAR PAR PAR z 2 PAR 2 PAR a a a PAR NAME.

No 6" GREEN PAR I gozzzTLl ggz fia 27 MJQLQwM Oct. 11, 1949.

Filed Sept. 50, 1947 STocK, CERTIFICATE Fog, PLAYER, No.11|

' l Pomr wnan m Esc ZPomTs WHEN IN BAmg STOCK, CEIQIFICPH'E FOR, PLAYER; No. 2..

GOOD FOR,

1. Pom-r wnen m'Esc ow. 2.Pom1's Wnan 13mg aPolm's WHLN w PM! EXCHANGE. 4.9011113 wm lumen/015ml! ,R. L. ROBBINS, JR

GAME BOARD 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 STOCK, CERTIFICATE. TI

150R, PLAY-ER, NOA

Goon EOR. lPolNT mm: m Escaow Goon FOR.

LPom'r wuu mEsc ow v 2.?om1's wm IN M 3.1 am: WHLNIN FOREIGN mm 4.9mm was. 1N RECEIVBRSHIP I M fw wz VEN TOR.

PoBBINsJB.

A TTOFNEYS'.

Patented Oct. 11, 1949 lTED STATES P T "OFF [C E GAME BOARD Application September 30,1947, Serial No. 7 77:0 14

Claims. 1

An object of my invention is to provide a game in which the element of suspense is maintained throughout the playing of the game. In fact, the player first finishing the game may not be the winner. Only after the values of the respective stock certificates have been tabulated and totaled on a score card, will the winner of the game be determined.

The value of the stockcertificates is subject to fluctuation during the playing of the game and this increases the interest of the player. In addition, the game has historical and geographical points of interest which will be of educational value to the players.

Another novel feature of the game is the ability of any player to move his playing piece or counter if his number appears on one of the dice even though another player threw the dice. Since a player can only advance his counter if his number appears on one of the dice regardless of who makes the play, it is possible for him to make a throw of the dice When his turn comes and not be able to move his own counter if the numbers appearing on the dice are not his number. The game can be played in a relatively short time so as not to become tedious to the players.

Other objects and advantages will appear in the following specification, and the novel features of the device will be particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings forming a part of this application, in which:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the game on a greatly reduced scale:

Figure 2 is an enlarged view of the globe portion of the game and illustrates the courses to be taken by the various counters;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of several of the stock certificates used in the playing of the game;

Figure 4 is a perspective view of several of the playing counters;

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the playing dice;

Figure 6 is a plan view of the score card; and

Figure '7 is a plan view of the six stock certificates used.

While I have shown only the preferred form of my invention, it should be understood that various changes or modifications may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

In carrying out my invention, I provide a game with a playing surface indicated generally at A .A. The band is divided into a plurality of equal arcuate-segments. In the present :game I have illustrated: six such-segments and these are numbered; from I to- 6, inclusive. The six numbers follow each other consecutively around the circular band .B and the arcuate segments they designate are separately colored. The arcuate segment *l' is colored red, segment 2 is colored black, segment --3 is colored yellow, segment A is colored purple, segment 5 is colored blue, and

segment 6. is colored green. I do not wish to be con-fined tov these particular colors because other colors could be used.

Each of the six arcuate segments is subdivided into four sections reading in -a counter-clockwise direction, Escrow, Bank, Foreign exchange and Receivership. These four sections in the arcuate segment -I are referred to as la, lb, l c, and id, respectively, when, reading in a [counter-clockwise direction. In like manner the four sections in the arcuate segments 2 to 6, inclusive, are designated with the number of the segment followed ;by the letter designating the particular section. The six arcuate segments of the circular band constitute the home bases for the six playing counters and at the center of each segment and tangent to the inner periphery l2 of the band B,,I provide small circles [3 divided into two halves. In one half of each circle I print the word Start and in the other half I print the word Finish. The counters of the players start from the half marked Sta-rt of these circles at the. beginning of the game and finish at the half marked Finish at the end of the game. The firstv player to negotiatethe course, which will bedescribed in detail, and arrive back at his circle 13 with his counter, completes the playing of the game, but is not necessarily the winner. The.

arrow 0. indicates the direction of travel of the counters along the circuitous trail I4.

Within the inner periphery I2 is a central circular area C of the playing board that has an outline map-cf the World. North and; South America,

Europe and Asia are shown. Also certain points of geographical and historical interest are indicated and these are Pearl Harbor, Sydney, the Panama Canal Zone, Rome, London, Berlin, Washington, D. 0., Nome, Manila, and Tokyo. These points of interest on the map are joined together in the order named by a circuitous trail M of circles that are tangent to each other. The trail starts from near the center circle I of the central area C and traverses the map area afrom Australia to Africa and then from Europe to Japan before returning to the center circle. The small circles forming the trail I are consecutively numbered from I to '6 and then the numbers repeat throughout the length of the trail with the exception of the circles that indicate the ten points of geographic and historical interest from Pearl Harbor to Tokyo, above mentioned. The numbered. circles of the trail have the same color as the corresponding numbered arcuate segments I to t, inclusive, of the outer circular band. The circles of the trail numbered I are colored red and so on up to the circles numbered I5 which are colored green. These colored and numbered circles of the circuitous trail I4 have a definite bearing on the playing of the game which will be described shortly. The uncolored and unnumbered circles of the trail associated with the ten points of interest on the map are safety zones and the counters of the players landing on any one of these zones at the termination of a play are safe from any attack by the counters of the opposing players. There are one hundred and forty-four circles forming the circuitous trail I4 counting the center circle I5 twice, although I do not wish to be confined to any particular number.

Between each Start-Finish circle I3 and the center circle I5, I provide a straight invulnerability trail N5 of seventeen squares. These trails are colored the same as the color of the arcuate segment I through 6, inclusive, from which they extend. Again, I do not wish to be confined to any particular number of squares contained in these straight and radially extending trails I6. Each of these straight trails is for the private travel of the piece or counter having the same color. I therefore call these straight trails, trails of invulnerability and a players counter while resting on any square in this trail is declared to be invulnerable and cannot be molested by the counters of opposing players. The purpose of these six radially extending trails I6 is to permit the player to accumulate stock certificates in the Bank in a manner hereinafter described and protects the player against possible immediate bankruptcy when subjected to penalties which the player may encounter when proceeding along the circuitous trail I4 with his counter. The center circle I5 has its area divided into six equal parts and each part is associated. with and positioned adjacent to the inner end of each straight trail I6 and is given a like color. The counters of the players move directly from the innermost square on their straight trail It to the center circle and thence to the first small circle marked I and colored red on the circuitous trail It. The center circle I 5 is used twice by each player during the playing of the game, once in the manner just mentioned and second when the counter leaves the end of the trail I l and returns to the trail IS.

A plurality of stock certificates shown in Figures 3 and '7 are provided for the players. Each player receives fifty stock certificates at the start of the game of the same color as the color of the arcuate segment from which he plays. I have shown one stock certificate of each of the six groups and these are numbered from 2| to 26, inclusive. The stock certificate 2i is colored tied, and certificate 22 is colored black, certificate 23 is colored yellow, and the certificates 24, 25 and 26 are colored purple, blue and green, respectively. A pair of dice indicated at 21 in Figure 5 are used in the playing of the game.

It will be noted from Figure 1 that the sections Id, 201, 3d, 4d, 5d and 6d, entitled Receivership, are marked with five pairs of angle lines disposed adjacent to the sides of the sections and these angle lines are numbered consecutively from I to 6 with the exception that the number of the arcuate segment in which the section (1 forms a part, is omitted. For example, section Id has no pair of angle lines marked I; section 2d has no pair of angle lines marked 2; and so on up to section 6d which has no pair of angle lines marked 6. The purpose of these lines will appear in the rules of the game and in the description of the play.

There are six playing counters or pieces, one for each player, and these may be of any shape desired. In Figure 4 I show them conical in shape with a cylindrical base and a spherical head. The counters D are preferably colored the same as the segments so that the player occupying arcuate segment I would have a counter colored red, and so on up to the player occupying arcuate segment 6 would have a counter colored green. It is possible to stamp the numbers 1 to 6 on the counters in addition to the coloring if desired.

The cylindrical base has a diameter preferably slightly smaller than that of the small colored circles forming the circuitous trail I4 so that when a counter comes to rest on any colored circle at the end of its move, the color of the circle can still be seen. The spherical top could have a miniature map of the world stamped thereon to carry out the illusion of world traveling and dealing in stock certificates that are negotiable in all parts of the world.

A score card is indicated at 28 in Figure 6, and its use will appear when the playing of the game is explained. It is best to set forth the rules of the game at this time and these rules will also explain how the game deals with the ramifications of usual monetary transactions and may be played by one up to six persons. Its associations are geographical and historical; interest is developed through the pursuit of speculation, highlighted by educational and entertainment value.

The unusual feature of the game is the element of suspense. The identity of the winning player is not known immediately at the close of the game; only after the values of the respective stock certificates owned by each player at the end of the game have been tabulated and totaled on a score card can the true winner be determined. During the process of play the initial value of each stock certificate is subject to fluctuation, hence the wealthiest player. in total number of points, is the winner.

If the game is played by only one player, greater interest is developed if he will select from three to five additional counters and plays against them, clockwise, as though such counters were employed by opponents. Should two players participate, it is recommended that each select from one to three additional counters; playing them,

individually, and in turn, to win over those of the other player. If three players participate, it is recommended that each select and play two counters. Four players can fill the playing board in like manner.

The game is played progressively. Each player selects a number from 1 to 6 and a stack of fifty stock certificates corresponding in color with the segment displaying the selected number and places these within the section a marked Escrow and places his counter (also corresponding in color) within the half of the circle l3 marked Start. The players have one throw of the dice and take turns in a clockwise direction, beginning with the lowest selected number.

The object of the game four points Escrow The quarterly section a of each of the six arcuate segments l to 6, inclusive, within which the player deposits fifty stock certificates at the start of the game, and from which stock certificates are transferred into the players Bank or opponents Receivership after each legal move.

Bank

The quarterly section b of each of the six arcuate segments I to 6, inclusive, wherein the players stock certificates are placed after transfer from players Escrow following a legal move. Only when in the Bank may the stock certificates be considered legal tender, provided the player is not bankrupt or insolvent.

Foreign exchange The quarterly section 0 of each of the six arcuate segments I to 5, inclusive, wherein opponents stock certificates are placed after transfer from opponents Bank due to payments imposed by player for rentals or satisfactions for the opponents counters coming to rest on the small circles in the circuitous trail l4 that have the same color and number as the players arcuate segment.

Recet'uership The quarterly section d of each of the six arouate segments l to e, inclusive, wherein opponents stock certificates are placed after transfer from opponents Escrow in lieu of payments which opponent is unable to make from a depleted Bank. The sections a have pairs of numbered angles and the opponents stock certificates are placed at the proper numbered angles corresponding to opponents number.

Trail of invalnerability When the player proceeds with his counter D, by reason of legal moves, from Start to the center circle l5, along the trail It of seventeen squares displaying the players selected color, the player is declared to be invulnerable. This enables the player to accumulate stock certificates in his Bank section b and protects the player against any possible and immediate bankruptcy when subjected to penalties which the player may encounter when proceeding along the circuitous trail Hi.

When the player advances his counter D, by reason of legal moves, following his return from the trail l4 and the center circle It: to the Finish half of the circle l3, along the straight trail is of seventeen squares havin the players selected color, the player is again declared to be invulnerable. This procedure enables the opponent to enjoy a brief respite from the players impositions and returns the player to a legal move and playing status as at the Start of the game.

Circaitous trail The" circuitous trail I4 is formed by the joining of the one hundred and forty-four colored circles, including the one designated as the center circle I5 (twice counted), and the circles labelled Pearl Harbor, Sydney, Canal Zone, Rome, London, Berlin, Washington, Nome, Manila, and Tokyo. Each player may exercise jurisdiction over twenty-two of these circles which display the players selected color and number. Advancement of the players counter is determined by his legal moves and the accompanying transfer of stock certificates is governed by the rules pertaining to speculation, rental, dividend, satisfaction, equity, immunity, Berlin, Tokyo, bankruptcy, insolvency and solvency, as applied to both player and opponent.

Legal moves There are three kinds of legal moves possible when a player throws the dice:

1. When one of the thrown dice shows upon its uppermost face the players number, the player shall transfer one share of his stock certificates from the players Escrow to the players Bank and the player may advance his counter or marker along the combined trails I4 and I6, beginning with the straight trail 16 of invulnerability, for the number of squares or circles, equal to the sum of the numbers appearing on both dice.

2. At the throw of the dice where the uppermost faces of both dice show numbers which total seven or eleven, the player making the throw may transfer two of his stock certificates from players Escrow to Bank and player may move his counter or marker for the number of squares or circles equal to the sum of the numbers on both dice.

3. At the throw of a double or where the uppermost faces of both dice show, individually, the players number who is making the throw, three of the players stock certificates may be transferred from players Escrow to players Bank and player may advance his counter for the number of squares or circles equal to the sum of the numbers showing on both dice.

4. When the player who throws the dice fails to turn up his number on either of the dice, he cannot make a move of his counter for that particular throw.

Opponent participation appears may transfer one stock certificate from his Escrow to his Bank and advance his counter for the number of squares or circles equivalent,

only, to opponents selected number. In the event that a double of opponent's number appears, opponent may move his counter for the number of squares or circles equal to the sum of both numbers on the dice, but may not transfer more than one stock certificate from his Escrow to his Bank. If two different numbers are turned up and represent the numbers of two opponents, both pponents may move their counters in the manner just explained.

Important! All transfers of stock certificates resulting from legal moves must be'executed before the counter is advanced and before all other contingent procedures are employed. An opponent participation is exercised or carried out only following the completion of the play by the player throwing the dice and then, in the order of the lower to the higher number. All orders of play are predicated on this arbitrary procedure. All moves are subject to government by the rules of Berlin and Tokyo, hereinafter explained.

Speculation This is an alternative legal move to which every player is entitled while at the playing board and at players and opponents discretion.

When, by reason of a legal move, player considers that a resulting move may be disadvantageous, player may elect to speculate by up-cnding both dice equally and reading the numbers on the bottom faces. When executing a speculation the player must first transfer one stock certificate from his Bank to the Bank of each opponent whose selected number appears as a result of the up ending play. If the throw of the dice results in a double, the player may not speculate. If the speculation is executed by a player 01" opponent whose counter and playing status is governed by the rules of Berlin or Tokyo, then the number of stock certificates involved in the transfer must be increased to two or three, respectively, as the case may be.

If the player elects to speculate after a throw of the dice which does not result in a legal move, then the player must transfer two of his stock certificates from his Bank to the Bank of each opponent whose selected number appears as result of the upending of the dice. If the resulting speculation is executed by a player or opponent whose counter and playing status is governed by the rules of Berlin and Tokyo, then the number of stock certificates involved in the transfer .must be increased to four or six, respectively, as the case may be.

If the player does not elect to speculate lowing a throw of the dice which does not result in a legal move, an opponent whose number appears on both dice (double) may elect to speculate, but must transfer two stock certificates from his Bank to the players Bank who made the throw. If the resulting speculation is executed by a player or opponent whose counter and playing status is governed by the rules of Berlin or Tokyo, then the number of stock certificates involved in the transfer must be increased to four or six, respectively, as the case may be.

If the player does not elect to speculate following a throw of the dice which does not result in a legal move, opponents whose selected numbers appear as a result of the play may elect to speculate and may do so after each opponent has transferred one stock certificate from his Bank to the players Bank who made the throw, provided both opponents are in accord with the procedure. If the resulting speculation is exe- 8 outed by the player or opponent whose counter and playing status is governed by the rules of Berlin or Tokyo, then the number of stock cerfor each involved in the transfer must be increased by two or three, respectively, as the case may be. Rental When by reason of a legal move, a players counter occupies the small circle allotted to an opponent on the circuitous trail l4 and marked with the opponents number, opponent may demand from the player of one stock certificate; such transfer to be made from players Bank to opponents Foreign Exchange.

Dividend When, by reason of a legal move, a players counter occupies the small circle allotted to himself cn the circuitous trail 14, the player may transfer two stock certificates from his Escrow to his Bank.

Satisfaction When, by reason of a legal move, a players counter passes opponents counter on the circuitous trail It, opponent may demand payment of one stock certificate; such transfer to be made from players Bank to opponents Foreign Exchange.

Equity When, by reason of a legal move, a players counter occupies the same small circle with opponents counter on the circuitous trail M, no penalty is extracted from the player, but the player may be obliged to execute a rental or profit from a dividend.

Immunity legal move, a players Berlin When, by reason of a legal move, a players marker occupies the small circle on the circuitous trail iii identified as Berlin, each opponent not governed by the rule of Berlin or Tokyo, must transfer two stock certificates from his Bank to the players Bank. The opponents who are governed by the rules of Berlin or Tokyo must transfer four or six stock certificates, respectively, from their Bank to the players Bank. In the event that players counter passes Berlin without occupying the circle marked Berlin, no transfer of stock certificates need be executed, but thereafter, until players counter occupies or passes Tokyo, the number of stock certificates normally transferred under the rules of rental, speculation, dividend, satisfaction, equity, bankruptcy, insolvency and solvency is doubled.

Tokyo When, by reason of a legal move, a players counter occupies the small circle on the circuitous trail lli identified as Tokyo, each opponent not governed by the rules of Berlin or Tokyo, must transfer three stock certificates from his Bank to players Bank. The opponents governed by the rules of Berlin or Tokyo must transfer six or 9.. nine stock certificates, respectively, from their Bank to the players Bank. In the event that players counter passes Tokyo without occupying. the circle associated with the name, no transfer of stock certificates need be executed, but, thereafter, until players counter occupies or passes the center circle 55, the number of stock certifi cates normally transferred under the rules of rental, speculation, ividend, satisfaction, equity, bankruptcy, insolvency and solvency is tripled.

Bankruptcy When, at any time during the process of play a player has depleted his: stock certificates in his Bank and is, therefore, unable to meet the obligations imposed on him by speculation, rental, satisfaction, equity, Berlin, Tokyo, insolvency and solvency, theplay-er must satisfy all of these obligations by transferring the required number of stock certificatesfrom. Escrow to h s opponents Receivershipl When, by reason of a legal move, the player would normally be entitledto transfer his stock certificates from Escrow to Bank, the player must,

instead, transfer his stock certificates from op ponents Receivership to opponents Foreign Exchange, beginning clockwise, and in an equitable manner, until all of the 'players stock certificates in opp'onents' Receivership have been redeemed... Until the Receivership of each opponent has been liquidated, the player must not return to normal procedure and shall be declared tobe a Bankrupt. The opponent receiving stock certificates from a player shall place them in the section 12 so-that their upper edges line up with the. corresponding lines bearing numbers which are the same as the number of the player.

Insolvency Solvency When, at any time during the process of play, the :player has been able to transfer all of his stock certificates from Escrow to Bank, and is not bankrupt, he is declared. to be solvent and each opponent, not governed by the rules of Berlin or Tokyo, must transfer one stock certificate from his Bank to players Escrow. A player may become solvent as many times during the play as circumstances, predicated upon legal moves and speculations, may permit.

Completion of game The player whose counter is first to return to the starting point and arrives at, or beyond, the half of the starting circle 13 marked Finish, terminates the game. The game is ended, but not necessarily won by this player.

Winner of game All stock certificates are now counted by each 10 player; the value of each being classified with respect to: the. section a,."b,. c or d of the areuat'e segment in which they have been accumulated. The total: for eachclassification is tabulated on aregulation scorecard, such as shown in Figure 6, or one similarly improvised, and the sum of each becomes the'final score on the basis of the following values:

Stock certificates remaining in Escrcw--par;. or I' point each;

Bank-double par, or 2zpoi nts' each;

Foreign exchange-tripl'e par, or 3 pointsLea'ch';

Receivership-quadr-uple par, or 4 points each.

The wealthiest player wins the game.

The stock certificates 2! to 25;. inclusive, and shown in Figures 3 and 7, are all identical except for'their colorandthe' notation appearing directly under the Wording Stock Certificate. Player one has fifty red stockcertificates and the notation indicated at 29 on certificates reads, For Player No. 1; Inli-ke' manner, player two has fifty black certificates and these carry the notation, For Player No. 2;. The fifty yellow oer" tificates carry the notation, For Player No. 3; the fifty purple certificates have printed thereon, For Player No. 4; the fifty blue certificates have the notation, For Player No. 5, and the fifty green certificates carry the wording, For PlayerNo. 6.

All of the stock certificates for each player has this additional information and indicated at printed thereon:

Good for 1. Point when in- Escrow 2 Points whenin Bank 3 Points when in Foreign Exchange 4 Points when in Receivership The score card: 28' used for totaling the scores and determining the winner at the end of eachgame is shown in detail in Figure The card: has six vertical columns 31, one for each player, and opposite the word- Name at the head of each: column can be written the players name; The next line 32 in. each of the six. columns refers to: the number of each player and the particular color associated with the number. Under the second row or line in each column appears four lines reading in descending consecutive order as follows:

Par

2 Par 3 Par 4 Par Two smaller width vertical columns 33 for receiving scoring figures: are arranged to the right of these last four. Par linesand a space 3 3 entitled Total is arranged at the bottom of the smaller width columns 3'3 for the purpose of receiving the-total scoreslof the players at the end of the game;

As already stated; the game is finished by player who negotiatesthe. entire ccurseirr accordance with the rules andlreturn's his counter D to the Finish half of his small circle it. He does not have to throw a number that will land his counter on the circle l3 for finishing the game. The number may be more than that needed to cause his counter to reach the Finish half of his circle l3. The extra numbers are merely treated as excess and are not used. After the game is finished, the winner is determined.

The score card 28 is used to determine the winner. Each player counts the number of stock certificates still remaining in the Escrow section a and according to the notation on each stock certificate, the player receives one'point for each of these certificates and the totals are entered by the score keeper opposite the word Par and in the proper column. Each player next counts the number of stock certificates in his Bank section b, and a number equal to twice the number of certificates is entered in the proper columns and opposite the notation 2 Par. Next the stock certificates in the Foreign Exchange section are counted by each player and the total multiplied by three and entered opposite the notation 3 Par. It should be noted that the stock certificates state that three points will be given for each certificate when it is in the Foreign Exchange section.

Finally the stock certificate in the Receivership sections d are counted by each player and the total number after being multiplied b four is entered opposite the notation 4 Par and in the proper column representing the player. items are now totaled and the winner of the game is the one receiving the highest number. He is considered to be the wealthiest player at the end of the game.

I claim:

1. A board for playing a game in which dummy transferable certificates are used in conjunction with movable counters, comprising a playing surface having an outer circuitous course divided into a number of major segments allocated to different players, each of which is divided into a number of sections representing predetermined playing operations, playing course lines for the several players counters extending inwardly from each section to a common point, and another circuitous playing course line for said counters, starting and ending at said common point, divided into a succession of counter moving steps quivalent in number to said major segments.

2. A board for playing a game of predetermined significance in which sets of dummy certificates of different colors are employed in conjunction with sets of movable, differently colored counters for different players, said board comprising a playing surface having an outer course divided into major segments of different colors allocated to difierent players, each of which is divided into a number of sections representing different predetermined playing operations, radial course lines for said segments leading to a common central point, a circuitous playing course line for the counters starting and ending at the central point and divided into a plurality of spaces arranged in repeating groups according to the number of segments, the succeeding spaces of each group being also colored the same as said segments.

3. A board for playing a game of predetermined significance employing sets of dummy transferable certificates and for the use of different players and a counter for each player comprising a playing surface having an outer circuitous band divided into major segments allocated to a plurality The H of players, each segment being divided into a number of sections representing different predetermined playing operations and containing a geographical map within the band, a circuitous playing course to be traversed by the counters starting adjacent the center of the playing surface and passing across prominent geographical points, said course being composed of successive groups of consecutively numbered spaces corresponding to the number of the segments and interspaced spaces bearing nomenclature indicative of the prominent geographical localities traversed, said playing surface having thereon other beginning and ending playing courses for the counters leading from each players segment to the point of commencement of the circuitous course.

4. A board for playing a game in which sets of dummy stock certificates and counters for difierent players are employed, comprising a playing surface having an outer marginal band divided into major segments allocated to a plurality of players, each segment being divided into a number of sections entitled Escrow, Bank, Foreign Exchange and Receivership, each segment having a starting and finishing point at the band, lines of play leading therefrom to a common meeting point over which the counters of the respective players may be moved, and another circuitous graduated line of play for said counters starting from and finishing at said common point.

5. A board for playing a game employing sets of dummy stock certificates and a counter for each player comprising a marginal band divided into major segments each segment being divided into separate sections entitled Escrow, Bank, Foreign Exchange and Receivership, the several Re ceiver sections in their successive order around the board having markings for indicating certificates which may be captured from each opposing player, said board having graduated playing courses for the counters of the respective players leading inwardly from the respective segments to a common point and provided with another graduated playing course for traverse of the several counters beginning and terminating at said common point.

ROBERT LASH ROBBINS, J 3.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,338,502 Gay Apr. 27, 1920 1,500,983 Deen July 8, 1924 1,558,288 Roman Oct. 20, 1925 1,609,262 Martinez Nov. 30,1926 1,628,412 Lesavoy May 10, 1927 1,994,053 Sweet Mar. 12, 1935 2,174,058 McGennis Sept. 26, 1939 2,343,812 Sikora Mar. 7, 1944

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3050303 *Jul 15, 1959Aug 21, 1962Renato F BorciStock market playing game
US3395922 *Aug 9, 1965Aug 6, 1968Panagiotis M. GarangiotisGame apparatus with a game board, marbles, and cards
US3397890 *Jun 2, 1964Aug 20, 1968Newton BurtonBoard game apparatus for simulating stock market operations
US3726527 *Jan 21, 1971Apr 10, 1973P SchaufflerWorld transport game apparatus
US4189153 *Jul 12, 1977Feb 19, 1980Werner ZollingerBoard game
US4378942 *Dec 19, 1980Apr 5, 1983Isaac Paul JTrading game
US4497490 *Apr 27, 1979Feb 5, 1985Rogers Jr Thurmond JBoard game affording competitive challenge among players
US4535994 *Apr 21, 1983Aug 20, 1985Cowan William PBoard game apparatus
US4709926 *May 15, 1986Dec 1, 1987Diegidio Leo CElectoral college game
EP0297870A1 *Jun 30, 1988Jan 4, 1989Timesmart LimitedBoard games
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/256
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00006, A63F3/00069
European ClassificationA63F3/00A6D