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Publication numberUS2484116 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1949
Filing dateFeb 23, 1946
Priority dateFeb 23, 1946
Publication numberUS 2484116 A, US 2484116A, US-A-2484116, US2484116 A, US2484116A
InventorsPapke Herbert A
Original AssigneePapke Herbert A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ocular toy
US 2484116 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. A. PAPKE OCULAR TOY Oct. 11, 1949.

Filed Feb. 23, 1946 NVEN TOR H ERBERT A PAPKE ATTORNEYS Patented Oct. 11, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 4 Claims.

The present invention relates to toys and more particularly to a toy presenting an optical illusion when in use.

The primary objects of the instant invent1on are to provide such a toy which is novel in character; to provide such a toy which is entertaining in use; to provide such a toy which is simple in construction; and, to provide such a toy which is economical in manufacture.

An illustrative embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the toy;

Figure 2 is a longitudinal sectional view thereof, partly broken away;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the type of lens used in the toy shown in Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a perspective view of an alternate or substitute type of lens; and

Figure 5 is likewise a perspective view of another alternate or substitute type of lens.

Referring then to the drawing wherein like parts of the toy shown are designated by the same numerals in the several views, the same comprises a tubular cylindrical body it of any suitable material such as plastic, metal or cardboard having an inner surface ll adapted to reflect light.

One end of the body I9 is provided with an annular internal swedged groove I2 within which is seated a concave or dished disc I3 of flexible material provided with a centrally disposed circular aperture [4 which disc is here shown as faced by a transparent flexible disc l5 of isinglass or the like likewise seated within the groove I2 and the body 10 is further provided with an internal swedged groove l6 adjacent its other end within which is seated a translucent disc lens I! having parallel corrugations 18 on one face thereof.

The body [0 is further provided with an outer pair of spaced internal annular swedged grooves I9, 20 and a collar 2| having an internal diameter slightly greater than the external diameter of the body In is provided with a plurality of spaced internal annular swedged grooves 22, 23, 24 and 25 whereby the collar may be secured to one end of the body 10 by rotatably fitting the same thereon with the grooves I9, 20 of the body in registration and embracing engagement with the grooves 22, 23 of the collar, all as best shown in Figure 2.

Flexible transparent discs 26, 21 likewise of isinglass or the like are seated in each groove 24, 25 and a plurality of colored glass pieces 28 such as marbles, glass chips or the like are loosely 5 disposed between the discs 26, 21 whereby they may be tumbled upon rotation of the collar 2| relative to the body It.

Substitute or alternate type lenses 29, 30 having cross-corrugated and concentric corrugated faces are shown in Figures 4 and 5.

In use, the user looks through the aperture [4 toward a source of light and upon rotating the collar 2| relative to the body I 0, varying and pleasing color effects are presented making a toy that is novel in character and entertaining in use.

It will thus be seen that the toy herein shown and described is simple in construction and economical in manufacture, and while but one specific embodiment of the invention has been herein shown and described, it will be understood that certain details of the construction shown may be altered or omitted without departing from the spirit of the invention as the same is defined by the following claims.

I claim:

1. A toy comprising a tubular cylindrical body having a light reflecting inner surface, a transverse apertured disc disposed adjacent one end thereof, a pair of spaced transverse transparent discs disposed adjacent the other end thereof, a transverse translucent disc disposed intermediate the length of the body, and a plurality of varicolored glass pieces disposed between the pair of spaced discs.

2. A toy comprising a tubular cylindrical body having a light reflecting inner surface, a transverse apertured disc disposed adjacent one end thereof, a pair of spaced transverse transparent discs disposed adjacent the other end thereof, a transverse translucent corrugated disc disposed intermediate the length of the body, and a plurality of vari-colored glass pieces disposed between the pair of spaced discs.

3. A toy comprising a tubular cylindrical body having a light reflecting inner surface, a transverse apertured disc disposed adjacent one end thereof, a transvers transparent disc disposed forwardly of the apertured disc, a pair of spaced transverse transparent discs disposed adjacent the other end thereof, a transverse translucent 4 REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,485,795 Mallernee Mar. 4, 1924 1,662,743 Hanson Mar. 13, 1928 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 451,153 Great Britain July 30, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1485795 *Oct 4, 1921Mar 4, 1924Mallernee Charles AKaleidoscope
US1662743 *Feb 23, 1927Mar 13, 1928Hanson Ossian B NKaleidoscope
GB451153A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2991689 *Oct 9, 1957Jul 11, 1961Taylor Beverly WKaleidoscopes
US3099933 *May 9, 1960Aug 6, 1963Marvin I GlassOptical toy
US3100418 *Apr 20, 1959Aug 13, 1963Posner WoolfOptical apparatus for producing changing designs
US3122859 *Sep 11, 1961Mar 3, 1964Reaux Jr Leon LaToy device for composing figure pictures
US3311226 *Feb 16, 1965Mar 28, 1967Oliver Wesley HAdvertising display can
US4740046 *May 27, 1986Apr 26, 1988Maccarthy PatrickLiquid kaleidoscope
US5009471 *Dec 21, 1989Apr 23, 1991Lee Vincent K WImproved kaleidoscope structure
US5391105 *Feb 1, 1994Feb 21, 1995Innoland, Inc.Picture toy having movable light coducting pegs to form patterns
US7578719 *Jun 15, 2006Aug 25, 2009Perry C. FaanesSculpture method utilizing new means of simulating, viewing, and displaying sporting, undersea and other environments
US7988520Aug 2, 2011Perry FaanesSculpture device
Classifications
U.S. Classification472/57, 359/617, 446/219
International ClassificationA63J15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63J15/00
European ClassificationA63J15/00