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Publication numberUS2485972 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 25, 1949
Filing dateJul 12, 1945
Priority dateJul 12, 1945
Publication numberUS 2485972 A, US 2485972A, US-A-2485972, US2485972 A, US2485972A
InventorsLehrman Leo A
Original AssigneeAmerican Steel Foundries
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Snubbed truck
US 2485972 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. A. LEHRMAN SNUBBED TRUCK Oct. 25, 1949.

` Filed July 12, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 ..--./...MWIIN IN VEN TOR. DC )9.@Uj7na/v Oct. 25, 1949. I L. A. LEHRMAN SNUBBED TRUCK 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 12, 1945 In@Ww Oct. 25, 1949. l.. A. LEHRMAN SNUBBED TRUCK Patented Oct. 25, 1949 SNUBBED TRUCK Leo A. Lehman, Chicago, lll., assigner to American Steel Foundries, Chica of New Jersey go, lll., a corporation Appummn July 12, 1945, serial No. 604,624 l2o claims. (ci. 10s-197) My invention relates to railway car trucks and more particularly to a freight car truck utilizing snubbing or friction con-trol means for dampening synchronous oscillations of thesprings normally used to support the bolster from the side frames. v

The general object of my invention is to design such a railway car truck wherein friction means supported 4by the bolster have associated therewith suitable control means for insuring substantially constant frictional bearing of the friction means against the side frame columns of the truck throughout the life of the friction vise a railway car truck such as that described l wherein friction shoes may be mounted in each side of each bolster end, each shoe being in wedge engagement with a bolster wall and in frictional engagement with a side frame column and wherein resilient means may be so associated with the friction shoes as to insure the shoes being maintained with suicient bearing against the columns and the bolster wedge surfaces.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary side elevation of a railway car ytruck embodying my invention, the view being shown partly in section in order w more clearly illustrate the arrangement of the friction parts. said sectional view being taken approximately in the longitudinal vertical plane bisecting the side frame as indicated by the line I--I of Figure 3, land Figure 2 is a further fragmentary sectional view taken approximately in the longitudinal vertical plane indicated by the line 2-2 of Figure 3.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary top plan view of the car truck shown in Figures 1 and 2, partly in section, .the view being taken approximately in the plane indicated by the line 3-3 of Figure 1;

Figures 4, 5 and 6 `are views illustrating my novel friction shoe utilized in the car truck shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3, Figure 4 being a top plan View thereof, Figure 5 a side elevation thereof,

2 I, and Figure 6 a view thereof looking toward the right of the shoe as seen in Figure 5;

Figure 7 is a fragmentary view comparable :to that shown in Figure 1, illustrating a modified form of my invention, said view being shown partly in section in the longitudinal vertical plane indicated by the line 1-1 of Figure 9, and Figure 8 is a fragmentary sectional view taken in the longitudinal vertical plane indicated by the line 6 -8 of Figure 9;

Figure 9 is a fragmentary top plan view of :the car truck shown in Figures 7 and 8, partly in section, said section being taken approximately in the plane indicated Iby the line 9-9 of Figure 7; and

Figures 10, 11 and 12 are views illustrating the novel form of friction shoe utilized in the car truck shown in Figures 7., 8 and 9, Figure 10 'being a top plan View thereof, Figure 11 being a side elevation thereof, and Figure 12 'a view looking toward the right of the shoe as seen in Figure 11.

In each of the views only one half of the bolster and side frame structures are shown inasmuch as the arrangement is similar at opposite ends and opposite sides of the truck.

Referring first to the modification illustrated in Figures 1 to 6, the side frame is of well-known truss type having the compression member 2, the tension member 4, and .the column 6, the bolster opening 8 receiving the bolster I0 supported as at I2 from the coil springs diagrammatically indicated at I4l I4, said lsprings being positioned l transverse inboard and outboard ribs 26 and 28 (Figure 3) Vdening with said top and bottom walls a friction shoe pocket 30 at each side of the bolster end, the adjacent side wall being cored away intermedi-ate the webs 26 and 28. The =bol ster is formed with the laterally extending inboard and outboard guide 1ugs3l and 32 receiving the adjacent column therebetween.

At the inboard and outboard sides of each pocket are formed the ledges 34 and 36 merging with the top wall I8 and with the respective in- `board and outboard webs 26 and 28, each ledge having a diagonal surface sloping upwardly toward the, adjacent column 6 and having complementary engagement as at 40 with the associated friction shoe, generally designated 42.

One of the friction shoes 42 is shown in detail in Figures 4 to 6, inclusive. said shoe comprising a main friction wall," frictionally engaged as at 46 with the adJacent`columnmounted wear plate 48. Integrally formed with the .main friction wall 44 of the friction shoe 42 are-the diagonal and horizontal walls 60 and 52, the diagonal wall A5|!` presenting the spaced wedge faces 54 and 56.y

urged into complementary engagement as at 40 with the diagonal surfaces of the inboard and outeach shoe intermediate the spaced wedge faces 54 Extending. outwardly of the diagonal wall 50 of.

and 66 thereof and between the ledges 34 and 36 of the bolster is a vertical wall 62 formed on said shoe and bearing as at 64 against the spring plate or seat 66, said spring seat extending longitudinally of the bolster in order to afford beary ing for the full length of the resilient pad 63, one face of which may be vulcanized thereto. The'opposite face of the pad 68 may bear against the center rib 24 and vertical expansion of the pad Y may be accommodated by the clearance afforded Y asat 10 between the pad and the bottom wall .20,

of the bolster as well as the clearance afforded as at 12 above the pad and the top wall I8 of the bolster. A portion of the center rib 24 may be cored away to form therein an opening 14 (Figure 1) to accommodate the ow of the pad under compression as ywell as to permit distortion of the pads at opposite sidesof the centerrib 24 of the bolster so that the pads will bear against each other under conditions of maximum distortion or flow of the resilient material. It will be apparent that the pad 68 will be subjected toa certain amount of compression upon assembly of the shoe with the bolster and positioning of the shoe in abutment with the adjacent column. In this arrangement, the pad 60 is under such compression as to maintain the friction shoe 42 seated at all times against the spaced ledges 34 and 36 of the bolster and to operatively urge the shoe upwardly into wedge engagement therewith and at the same time the pad 68 will constantly urge the friction shoe outwardly and maintain it in substantially upright position irrespective of any angling of the bolster permitted within existing tolerances under service conditions.

It may be noted that the wan e2 or the shoe 42 is formed with an arcuate recess 16 centrally thereof and extending from top to bottom thereof in complementary engagement with the central portion of the spring plate 66 and is also formed with the plane faces 18 and 80 at op'- posite sides of the recess 16 in complementary engagement with the lateral ,ends of the spring plate 66. whereby the shoe is maintained in a central position between the walls 26 and 28 of the pocket by the pad 68 being placed in shear to yieldably resist lateral movement of the shoe in the bolster pocket while vertical movement of the shoe will be permitted as the shoe is moved'diagonally along the ledges of ,the bolster under service conditions.

Each shoe may have an opening 82 cored horizontally therethrough aligned with openings in the inboard and outboard walls 26 and 28 of the pocket .for the reception of pin means which may position the shoe in assembled relationship with the bolster when the shoe has been urged inwardly of the pocket whereby clearance andere will-be'vafforded from the adjacent side column to permit the assembly or disassembly of the bolster with'the side'jrame. l

In the assemblyof the friction devices with the bolster, the pads 68 may be inserted in the respective pockets in the sides' of the `bolster and positioned against the center rib 24 of the bolster. The\ pads 60 mayl then be positioned on the bottom'wall ofthe bolster and the shoes inserted in the bolster pockets with the wedge .faces 54 and 56 inengagement with the diagonal surfaces of the wedges. 34 and 36 ofthe bolster'and the shoes may thereafter be urged along the latter surfaces to place the pads 60 and 68 under compression until the opening 82 in each shoe is in alignment .with the openings in the inboard and outboardwalls of the associated pocket for' the reception of pin means. Inthe' modification illustrated in Figures 'I to v12, inclusive, the side frame structure is similar to that of the modification previously described, the sideframe comprising the column |02 having the bolster end |04,supported adjacent thereto by the bolster springs (not shown), said bolster end comprising a pocketv|06 in each side thereof deflned by the top and bottomvwalls |08 and ||0, the center rib ||2 and the transverse inboard and outboard walls ||4 and ||6 spaced from the center rib ||2. Received within each pocket |06 is a friction shoe, generally designated H8, and shown in detail in Figures 10, 1l and l2, said shoe comprising the main friction wall|20 in engagement withl the friction plate |2| xed to the column' |02 'and having angularly arranged walls |22 and |24 vmerging with the wall |20, said wall |22 havingspaced Wedge surfaces |26, |26 in engagement with the diagonal portions |28, |28 of the webs |30, |30 extending between thetop and Y bottom walls |08 and i0 of the bolster within the pocket |06. at eachof the inboard and outboard sides thereofand merging with the respective inboard and outboard walls H4 and |6, said walls |24 of the shoe ||8 having` engagement with resilient pads |32, |32 seated on the diagonal por-- tions |34, |34'of the webs |30,'i30. It may be notedfrom a consideration of Figure 7 that each of the diagonal portions |28, |28 of each of the Iwebs |30, |30 is relieved as at |35 to'prevent wearing of shoulders thereon by the movement of the shoes and to allow flow of the associated pad |32 upon inward movement of the shoe along the diagonal portions |28, |28 of the webs |30, |30. Integrally formed with the walls |22 and |24 of each shoe and projecting laterally therefrom between the webs |30, |30 is the vertical wall |36 in engagement as at |38 with a spring plate |40 vulcanized to thek resilient pad |42 which may bear as at |44 against the center rib of the bolster,

-vertical expansion of said pad being restricted by its bearing against the top and bottom walls of the bolster end, there being some clearance afforded above and below the pad. The rib is provided with an opening |46 therein permitting the flow of the p ad under compression as well as to permit distortion of the pads at opposite sides of the rib so that'the pads may bear against each other.

An important feature of the present modification is the formationof the rear wall of the shoe H8 in complementary engagement with the spring plate |40 as seen in Figures 10, 11 and `12. The 'rear wall ofthe shoe is formed with the spaced faces |50, |50 arcuately curved from top to bottom thereof with the central projecting portion |52 of the wall, intermediate the faces |60,

|60, presenting a face |66 which. is of substantially toric shape inasmuch as it has a curvature extending vertically over a substantially greater radius than the curvature across the same, said faces |60, |60 and |66 being in complementary engagement with the spring plate |40. This construction of the rear face of the wall |36 ofthe shoe H0 and the surface of the plate |40 in engagement therewith allows a padf maximum volume to be mounted in the pocket of the bolster and thereby permit a larger compression area of the pad to be utilized. Another advantage resides in this construction in that the shoe is positioned in such manner that the rubber pad |42 will tend to maintain the shoe in a central upright position by restricting vertical and lateral movement of the shoe in the pocket. j

It will be apparent that in the arrangement described, the pads |32 under compression between the shoe and the bolster will tend to urge the shoe outward of the pocket along the diagonal portions |20, of the webs |30, |30 to engage the friction wall |20 of the shoe with the ad jacent column. At the same time, the pad |42 under compression between the shoe and the bolster will constantly urge the shoe outwardly toward the adjacent column and maintain the shoe in full face engagement with the column friction plate irrespective of vertical and horizontal angling of the bolster relative to the side frame columns under service conditions.

Each shoe is provided with a horizontal opening |60 therethrough for alignment with openings |62 in the transverse bolster walls by means of a shoe-positioning pin received within the openings for positioning the shoes in assembled relationship with the bolster whereby the shoe may be forced into the associated pocket to provide sufficient clearance from the adjacent side column in the assembly or disassembly of the bolster with the side frame.

In the assembly of the friction devices with the bolster, each rubber pad |42 may be inserted within the open end of the bolster between the top and bottom walls thereof and between the center rib ||2 and the adjacent spaced webs |30' and thereafter the pads |32, |32 may be positioned on the diagonal portions of the webs |30, in each pocket |06 in the bolster.v The shoes may then be inserted in the pockets |06 and urged inwardly along the wedge` surfaces of the diagonal portions |28, |28 of the webs |30, |30 until the opening |62 in each shoe is aligned with the openings in the inboard and outboard walls' ||4 and ||6 whereupon pin means may be inserted within the openings for maintaining the shoes in a retracted position within the bolster for subsequent assembly of the bolster with the side frames.

It is to be understood that I do not wish to be g limited by the exact embodiments of the device shown 'which are merely by way of illustration and not limitation as various and other forms of the device will, of course, be apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope'oi' the claims.

I claim:

1. In a railway car truck, a side frame having .y

` 6 and a friction face bearing on the adjacent column, and a plurality of resilient means'associated with each shoe. one of said resilient means being compressed between a wall of said shoe and a spaced wall of said bolster and the other of said resilient means being compressed between another wall of said shoe and another wall of said bolster, saidresilient means comprising distortable rubber pads respectively urging said shoe along said wedge surfaces and outwardly into engagement 'with the adjacent column.

2. In a railway car truck, a side frame having spaced columns, a bolster supported from said frame between said columns, a pocket in each side of said bolster adjacent each column, a friction shoe inteach pocket comprising a friction surface on one side thereof in engagement with the adjacent column and angularly arranged faces on the opposite side thereof, one of said faces being in wedge engagement with said bolster and the other face affording a spring seat, resilient means compressed between said spring seat' and a spaced'wall of said bolster, and resilient means compressed between a portion of said shoe projecting from' said faces and another wall of said bolster, said resilient means comprising distortable resilient pads respectively urging said shoe into said wedge engagement and outwardly into engagement with the adjacent column.

3. In a railway car truck, a side frame having spaced columns, a bolster supported from said frame between said columns and comprising top and bottom walls, a center rib and transverse walls defining a pocket at each side of said bolster, spaced webs in each pocket at the inboard and outboard sides thereof each comprising a wedge surface, and a spring seat, a shoe in each pocket in engagement with each of said wedge surfaces, a resilient member compressed between said shoe and each of said seats and operative to urge said shoe along said wedge surfaces, and resilient means between said shoe and a spaced wall of said `bolster and operative to urge said shoe outwardly into engagement with an adjacent column. v

4. In a railway car truck, a side frame comprising spaced columns, a bolster supported from said frame between said columns, a pocket in each side of said bolstervcomprising spaced inboard and outboard webs each having a wedge surface sloping upwardly toward the adjacent column and a spring seat sloping -downwardly toward the adjacent column, a friction shoe in each pocket in engagement with said wedge surfaces, resilient means compressed between said spring seats and said shoe and operative to urge said shoealong said surfaces, and resilient means compressed between a portion of said shoe extending between said surfaces and a spaced wall of said bolster and urging said shoe outwardly of said bolster.

5. In a railway car truck, a side frame comprising spaced columns, a bolster supported from said frame between said columns, a pocket in each side of said bolster comprising spaced coplanar inboard and outboard surfaces and spaced coplanar spring seats, said surfaces and saidl seats being angularly arranged and sloping toward the adjacent column, a friction shoe inl each pocket in engagement with said surfaces and in frictional engagement with the adjacent column, resilient means compressed between said shoe and said spring seats urging said shoe along said surfaces, and independent resilient means com- .prisins spaced pressed between said bolster.

6. In a railway car truck, a side frame comcolumns comprising topv and bottom walls, a center rib and transverse webs dening a pocket in each side of said bolster adjacent each column, spaced inboard and outboard wedge surfaces in each pocket on one of said walls, a friction shoe in each pocket in engagement 'with said wedge surfaces, spaced spring seats in each pocket on the other of said' walls, resilient means com@ said spring seats and said shoe and urging said independent resilient means compressed lbetween said center rib and a portion of said shoe extending between said surfaces and urging said shoeoutwardly of said bolster.

` 1.V In a` railway car truck, a side frame having supported from said spaced columns. a bolster a pocket in each side frame between said columns,

' of said bolster comprising spaced wedge surfaces sloping upwardly toward the adjacent column, a friction shoe in each pocket having spaced wedge faces in engagement with said surfaces,

a wall on said shoe intermediate said faces andextending between said wedge surfaces, a resilient member compressed between said wall and a spaced bolster Wall and operative to urge said shoe outwardly into engagement with said column, and a resilient pad compressed between columns, a bolster between said shoe along said surfaces, and

another wall of said shoe'and another-.wall of i Vspaced wedge faces in engagement with said surfaces, a wall on said shoe intermediate said faces and extending between said surfaces, a resilient member compressed between said wall and a spaced bolster wall and operative to urge said said bolster and operative to urger said shoe along said wedge surfaces.

faces and a spaced wall of said bolster and urging said shoeA outwardly of said bolster.

11. In a railway car truck, a side frame comprising spaced columns.

said frame between said columns, a pocket in said -bolster adjacent each column, a pair of spaced wedge surfaces in each pocket, a friction shoein each pocket in engagement with said sur.

faces and engaging the adjacent column, a re-A silient pad compressed between said shoe anda spaced wall of said bolster, and a resilient member compressed between a portion of said shoe extending between said surfaces and another wall of said bolster, said resilient pad and member respectively urging said shoe along said wedge surfaces and outwardly into engagement with the adjacent column.

12. In a' railway car truck, a side frame comprising spaced columns, a bolster supported from said frame between said columns, a pocketin each side of said bolster comprising spaced inboard and outboard webs each having a wedge Asurface sloping upwardly toward they adjacent column and a spring seat sloping downwardly toward the adjacent column, a friction shoe in each pocket in engagement with said wedgevsur-x faces, and resilient means compressed between saidA spring seats and said shoe urging said shoe along said surfaces and into engagement with the adjacent column. v

13. In a railway car truck, a side frame comprising spaced columns, a bolster supported from said frame between said columns, a pocket in said bolster adjacent each column, a friction shoe in each pocket'havinga friction face on one side I l thereof and diagonally'arranged surfaces onlthe shoe outwardly into engagement with said column, and a resilient member compressed between the bottom of said shoe and another wall of said bolster. l

.9. In a railway car truck, a side frame having spaced columns, a bolster supported from said frame between said columns and having a pocket in each side thereof comprising spaced wedge surfaces sloping upwardly toward the adjacent column, a friction shoe in each pocket in engagement with said surfaces and having a wall extending between said surfaces, a resilient member compressed between the wall of said shoe and a vertical wall of said bolster and operative to urge said shoe outwardly into engagement with said column, and a resilient member compressed between a diagonal wall of said shoe and a diagonal wall of said bolster and operative to urge .said shoe along said wedge surfaces.

opposite side thereof, a resilient -pad compressed between a wall of said bolster and one of said surfaces and operative to urge the other of said surfaces into wedge engagement with another wall of said bolster and said friction face into engagement with the adjacent column, and a block of resilient material compressed between a portion of said shoe extending between said surfaces and another wall of said bolster and complementing the action of said pad in urging y said friction face into engagement with the adjacent column, said pad and said block cooperating with each other to maintain said shoe in a substantially upright position irrespective of any angling of the bolster.

14. In a railway car truck, a side frame com prising spaced columns, a bolster supported between said columns, a pocket in each side of said bolster adjacent each column, each` of said pockets having a wedge surface and a spring seat spaced therefrom and sloping toward the adjacent column, a friction shoe in each pocket having diagonally arranged surfaces in engagement with said surface, resilient means compressed between said spring seat and said shoe and urging said shoe along said surface and into engagement with the adjacent column, and a Ablocl: of resilient material compressed between a portion of said shoe extending between said surfaces and another wall of said bolster for complementing the action of said resilient means, said resilient means and said block cooperating with each other to maintain said shoe in a subin spite of any angling 8 Y and resilient means compressed between a portion of said shoe extending between said sura bolster supported fromside thereof adjacent each column, a wedge surface in each pocket, a friction shoe with diagonally arranged surfaces in each pocket, a resilient pad compressed between said shoe and a spaced Wall of said bolster and operative to urge said shoe along said surface and into engagement with the adjacent column, and another resilient pad compressed between a portion of said shoe extending between said surfaces and another wall of said bolster, said pads cooperating with each other to maintain said shoe in a substantially upright position irrespective of any angling of the bolster.

16. In a railway car truck, a side frame comprising spaced columns, a bolster between said columns having a pocket adjacent each column, a wedge surface in said pocket sloping toward the adjacent column, a friction shoe in each l pocket, resilient pads compressed between spaced surfaces on said shoe and an adjacent wall of said bolster urging said shoe along said wedge surface and outwardly ofsaid bolster and into frictional engagement with the adjacent column, a block of resilient material compressed between a portion of said shoe extending between said surfaces and another wall'of said bolstemand complementing the action of said pads in urging said shoe into engagement with the adjacent column, and an opening in said last-mentioned bolster wall for accommodating the bulging of said block as it is compressed.

17. In a railway car truck, a side frame comprising a column, a bolster spring-supported by said frame adjacent said column, said bolster comprising a pocket containing converging surfaces, a friction shoe in said pocket, a resilient pad compressed between the shoe and one surface for urging the shoe into wedge engagement with the other surface and into frictional engagement with the column, said other surface beingV relieved at the inner extremity thereof to' accommodate bulging of vsaid, pad upon compression thereof. Y

18. Inv a railway car truck, a side frame. comprising a column member, a relatively movable member supported from said frame and having a pocket adjacent said column, a friction shoe in said pocket, and resilient pads respectively urging said shoe into wedge engagement with said movable member and outwardly of said lastmentioned member into frictional engagement with the adjacent column, said pads exerting forces cooperating with each other for maintaining said shoe in a substantially upright position in spite of any angling of said movable member.

19. In a railway car truck, a side frame having spaced columns, a bolster supported from said frame and having a pocket adjacent each col umn, friction shoes in said pockets bearing against wedge surfaces on the bolster, and a plurality of resilient pads compressed between said shoes and said bolster, urging each shoe into engagement with the adjacent column and cooperating with each other for maintaining said shoe in a substantially upright position irrespective of any angling of said bolster.

20. In a railway car truck, a side frame comprising a column, a bolster spring-supported from said frame adjacent said column, a pocket in said bolster, spaced wedge surfaces on said bolster Within said pocket, a friction shoe engaged with said surfaces and frictionally engaging said column, a horizontal spring compressed between said shoe and a wall of said bolster for urging said shoe against the column, and a resilient pad compressed between vertically spaced abutment surfaces on said shoe and said bolster respectively for urging said shoe against said surfaces. LEO A. LEHRMAN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are le of this patent:

of record in the.

Light June 19, 19451

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1293810 *Jul 8, 1918Feb 11, 1919Albert S KuxShock-absorbing device.
US2257109 *Aug 23, 1938Sep 30, 1941Davidson Arthur CTruck stabilizer
US2333921 *Jan 30, 1941Nov 9, 1943American Steel FoundriesCar truck
US2378415 *Apr 5, 1943Jun 19, 1945American Steel FoundriesCar truck
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2908232 *Aug 13, 1956Oct 13, 1959American Steel FoundriesSnubbed truck
US2957434 *Jul 25, 1957Oct 25, 1960American Steel FoundriesSnubbed truck
US4230047 *Oct 20, 1978Oct 28, 1980A. Stucki CompanyRailway truck bolster friction assembly
USRE31784 *Oct 26, 1982Jan 1, 1985A. Stucki CompanyRailway truck bolster friction assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification105/198.5, 105/198.4
International ClassificationB61F5/02, B61F5/12
Cooperative ClassificationB61F5/125
European ClassificationB61F5/12C