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Publication numberUS2486667 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1949
Filing dateJul 6, 1945
Priority dateJul 6, 1945
Publication numberUS 2486667 A, US 2486667A, US-A-2486667, US2486667 A, US2486667A
InventorsAlbert R Meister
Original AssigneeAlbert R Meister
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Artificial respirator
US 2486667 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 1, 1949.

Filed July 6, 1945 A. R. MEISTER 2,486,667

ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATOR 2 Shee Ls-Sheet 1 INVENTOR zijQMezlsZer ATTORNEYS Nov. 1, 1949.

A. R. MEISTER ARTIFICIAL RESPIRAIOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 6, 1945 BY m 714124. 21/

ATTORNEYS Patented Nov. 1, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 8 Claims. 1

This invention is directed to, and it is an object to provide, a power actuated device for producing artificial respiration of persons who have been drowned or asphyxiated, or whose respiratory systems, because of paralysis, have need of artificial stimulation. The device is arranged to efiect the same type of artificial respiration as is conventionally done by hand.

A further object of the invention is to provide a power actuated artificial respirator which includes a relatively wide belt adapted to encircle the chest diaphragm of the person to be treated; there being an actuator connected between opposite ends of the belt arranged to successively tighten and loosen such belt whereby to produce the desired compression-expansion cycles.

An additional object is to provide an artificial respirator, as in the preceding paragraph, in which the belt is quickly adjustable in length, and there being compression pads on the belt in easily adjustable relation; all whereby the device may be properly afiixed without time loss in emergency cases.

Another object of the invention is to provide a power actuated artificial respirator which is constructed so that the number of impulses or compression-expansion cycles of the device is correct for maximum effectiveness; such timing being difficult to accomplish in manual artificial respiration.

A further object of the invention is to produce a simple and inexpensive device, and yet one which will be exceedingly efiective for the purpose for which it is designed.

These objects are accomplished by means of such structure and relative arrangement of parts as will fully appear by a perusal of the following specification and claims.

In the drawings similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in the several views:

Figure l is an elevation of the device.

Figure 2 is a cross section on line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Figure 3 is a bottom plan view of the actuator, partly broken away.

Figure 4 is an end view of the actuator, partly broken away.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary cross section on line 5-5 of Fig. 3.

Referring now more particularly to the characters of reference on the drawings, the artificial respirator comprises an elongated relatively wide flexible belt I of canvas or the like; such belt being provided, intermediate its ends and on its inner face, with a pair of compression units, as indicated generally at 2. Each compression unit comprises a plurality of compression pads 3 disposed in side by side relation and extending transversely of the belt for the full width thereof; said pads being connected together at adjacent sides, as at 4.

Each compression unit 2 is longitudinally slidably adjustably secured to the belt I by encircling metallic straps 5, whereby said units 2 may be disposed on the belt I in proper position, as will hereinafter appear.

At the adjacent initially free ends the belt I is coupled to a power actuator, indicated generally at 6, and which comprises the following:

A relatively small box-like housing I is disposed at the top of the device, and adjacent one end includes a pair of spaced depending ears 3 connected together below said housing by a cross pin 9. One end of the belt I is provided with a slip-type clamping buckle I0, from which a loop I I projects and through which loop the cross pin 9 engages. By reason of the use of the slip-type clamping buckle ID the effective length of the belt I can be readily and quickly adjusted as is necessary in an emergency device.

The belt I is connected in quick coupling relation with a housing supported slide I2 by the following means:

The adjacent end of the belt I has a transversely extending hinge part l3 fixed thereto by rivets I4, while the complementary hinge part, i. e. the complementary hinge sleeves I5, is fixed on the bottom of the slide I2 in transversely extending, spaced relation. When the device is in use the hinge part I3 is coupled to the hinge sleeves I5 by means of a removable cross pin I6.

Within the housing I there is power mechanism operative to reciprocate the slide I2 at a predetermined rate of reciprocation, and such mechanism comprises the following:

The slide I 2 is fitted, along opposite sides, with guide bars I! which ride in channels I8 formed along opposite sides of a bottom plate I9 of the housing I. The slide I2 is formed, intermediate its ends, with a relatively wide, longitudinally extending depression, as shown, to permit of the mounting of certain of the working parts on the bottom plate I9 in the manner as will hereinafter appear.

Between the top and the bottom plate I!) of the housing the latter encloses a relatively small electric motor 20 adapted to be energized through the medium of an electric cord 2! which extends out of the housing to a source of electric current, which may for example-be a battery on the emergency vehicle which carries the artificial respirator. The motor 26 driving through a reduction gear train, indicated generally at 22, rotates a stub shaft '23 which extends through the bottom plate I9, and said shaft, between the bot tom plate I9 and slide I2, is fitted with a crank disc 24 which carries an ofiset roller 25. The offset roller 25 rides in a transverse channel 26 fixed on the slide I2 intermediate its ends. It will thus be seen that upon operation of the motor 20, with resultant but relatively slow-speed turnon the belt shortening stroke of the slide l2, a.

I swing lever 21 is pivoted to the under side of the bottom plate l9, as at 28, and at itsopposite end the lever includes a roller 29. which rides against one side of the transverse channel '26. The lever 21 is spring-urged in a directionto impart belt tightening movement to the slide [2 by means of a relatively heavy-duty tension spring 30 connected between the lever 21, intermediate its ends, and a point on the bottom plate 19, as at 3!. This spring 3!] not only assists or boosts the motor on the belt-tightening stroke of the slide l2, but also imparts what may be termed a spring action to the tightening of said belt, whereby to enhance the respiration producing action of the device.

When the above described device is in use the victim of drowning, for example, or asphyxiation, is placed face downward, as is customary for artificial respiration. Thereafter the belt is extended about the diaphragm portion of the person, with the housing I centered on the persons back; this being easily and quickly accomplished by means of the coupling including the hinge part 13 and removable cross pin 16. After the belt I is so placed, the compression units 2 are adjusted to correct position on opposite sides of the persons diaphragm, and the slip-type clamping buckle adjusted to tension said belt I.

With the device in place, the motor is started, which causes a constant but relatively slow reciprocation of the slide I 2, and a recurring compression and expansion cycle of the assembly of belt I and compression units 2. The device thus produces mechanically, and through the medium of the described arrangement, the same type of artificial respiration which is conventionally accomplished manually. However, with the power actuated device the timing is more accurate and the compression-expansion cycle is more effective, for the reason that the same amount of compression is applied during each cycle, and then relieved at the proper time in such cycle.

In asphyxiationthe supine position can be used with the motor housing resting on the front of the body, while in paralysis of the lungs, the position most comfortable to the victim can be used.

From the foregoing description it will be readily seen that there has been produced such a device as substantially fulfills the objects of the invention as set forth herein.

While this specification sets forth in detail the present and preferredconstruction of the device, still in practice such deviations from such detail may be resorted to as do not form a departure from the spirit of the invention, as defined by the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, the following is claimed as new and useful and upon which Letters Patent is desired:

1. An artificial respirator comprising a flexible belt adapted to extend about a persons body, a power driven actuator including a housing, one end of the belt being attached to said housing, a slide on the housing movable lengthwise of the belt, the other end of the belt being attached to the slide, and power means in the housing operative to reciprocate the slide.

2. An artificial respirator as in claim 1 in which said power means includes an electric motor in the housing.

3. An artificial respirator comprising a flexible belt adapted to extend about a persons body, a power driven actuator including a housing, one end of the belt being attached to the housing, a slide on the housing movable lengthwise of the belt, the other end of the belt being attached tothe slide, an electric motor and reduction gear unit in the housing, a crank driven from said unit, and meansbetween the crank and slide operative to reciprocate the latter upon rotation of the crank; there being a spring arranged to resist movement of the slide in one direction.

4. An artificial respirator comprising a flexible belt adapted to extend about a persons body, a housing, a slide mounted on the housing for movement lengthwise of the belt, the ends of the belt being attached to the housing and slide, respectively, an electric motor and reduction gear unit mounted in the housing, a crank journaled in the housing and driven by said unit, and means between the crank and slide to reciprocate the latter when the crank rotates.

5. An artificial respirator comprisin a flexible belt adapted to extend about a persons body, a housing, a slide mounted on the housing for movement lengthwise of the belt, the ends of the belt being attached to the housing and slide, respectively, an electric motor and reduction gear unit mounted in the housing, a crank journaled in the housing and driven by said unit, and means between the crank and slide to reciprocate the latter when the crank rotates; said means including a transverse channel on the slide, the crank including a roller riding in the channel;

6. A device as in claim 5 including a lever pivoted on the housing for swinging movement in the direction of the movement of the slide, a roller on the lever bearing against one side of the channel, and a spring connected to said lever and housing and urging the same toward the channel.

7. An artificial respirator comprising a pair'of parallel, relatively reciprocable members, means to reciprocate the same, a belt adapted to be disposed about a human body, one end of the belt being attached to one of the members and the other end of the belt being attached to the'other member in spaced relation relative to the first named connection, whereby upon reciprocation of said members the ends of the belt will be alternately pulled toward each other and pushed apart.

8. A respirator as in claim 7, in which the member-reciprocating means includes an electric motor mounted onone member, and a crank driven by the motor, said crank having a sliding drive connection with the other member.

ALBERT R. MEISTER.

REFERENCES CITED 1 The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 517,194 Rostel Mar. 27, 1894 1,783,171 Knott Nov. 25, 1930 1,802,140 De Remer Apr. 21, 1931 1,848,212 Waterman Mar. 8 1932 2,103,956 Schumacher Dec. 28, 1937 2,314,981 Heard Mar. 30. 1943

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification601/41
International ClassificationA61H31/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H31/006, A61H2201/165, A61H31/00, A61H2031/003
European ClassificationA61H31/00H4, A61H31/00