Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2487630 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 8, 1949
Filing dateJul 25, 1946
Priority dateJul 25, 1946
Publication numberUS 2487630 A, US 2487630A, US-A-2487630, US2487630 A, US2487630A
InventorsJose Alvarez Octavio
Original AssigneeAlvarez Patent Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Syringe
US 2487630 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

0. J. ALVAREZ Nov. 8, 1949 SYRINGE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 25, 1946 INVENTOR. W J m W0C Nov. 8, 1949 o. J. ALVAREZ 2,487,630

' SYRINGE Filed Jui 25, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

Patented Nov. 8, 1949 SYRINGE Octavio Jose Alvarez, New York, N. Y., assignor to Alvarez Patent Corporation, New York, N. Y.

Application July 25, 1946, Serial No. 686,137

Claims. 1

My present invention relates to syringes and more particularly to syringes for introducing liquid or liquids into cavities of the human body.

It is another object of my present invention to provide a syringe arrangement by which it is possible to introduce a liquid into a cavity of the human body so that it reaches the entire inner surface of this cavity.

It is another object of my present invention to provide a syringe by which it is possible to expand the cavity of the body into which the syringe is to be introduced before introduction of the liquid.

Another object of my present invention is a syringe which is constructed so that its outer surface contacting the walls of the cavity into which the syringe is introduced is resilient, so as to prevent any injury to the tissues of the cavity.

Still another object of my present invention consists of a syringe constructed so that the diameter of its front end can be adjusted b the person using the same after introduction of the syringe into the body cavity.

With the above objects in. view, my present invention mainly consists of a syringe for introducing liquids into a cavity of the human body comprising in combination a tubular conduit for introducing the liquid, an introducing opening at the front end of this tubular conduit, means for supplying liquid into and through the tubular conduit described above, an expandible member arranged at the front end of the tubular conduit, and finally, means connected with this expandible member for expanding the same, whenever required.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of my present invention, the means for supplying the liquid through the tubu ar conduit are connected with the rear end of the tubular conduit. These liquid supplying means might consist of a hollow rubber member, s. g. a rubber bulb or a rubber cushion adapted to be filled with the liquid to be introduced; these means might, however, also consist of an open receptacle connected in well known manner with the rear end of the tubular conduit to be introduced into the body cavity.

The expandible member arranged at the front end of the tubular conduit might be constructed and shaped in many different ways. I have however, found it is advisable to provide as such member a closed resilient rubber tube surrounding the tubular conduit extending rearwardly from the front end of this conduit and provided with an expandible front end portion surrounding the front end of the tubular conduit. By forcing a gaseous substance, e. g. air into this closed resilient rubber tube, the expandible rubber front end portion of the same is inflated, pressing against the walls of the body cavity and forcing the same apart so as to enable access of the introduced liquid to every portion of the inner surface of the cavity Walls.

The means for expanding the above mentioned expandible member, e, g. the closed resilient rubber tube described in th preceding paragraph might also be constructed in different ways. Thus, it is possible to combine with the rear end of the closed resilient rubber tube an air filled bulb or cushion; however, it is theoretically also possible to provide separate pump-like means to connect the same by a tubular member with the expandible member, e. g. the rear end of the resilient rubber tube mentioned above.

It should be mentioned that in some cases it is advisable to make the tubular conduit relatively rigid so as to facilitate its introduction into a body cavity. In such event it is of particular importance to make the tubular expandible member surrounding the tubular conduit particularly resilient so as to prevent any possibility of injury to the tissues of the body cavity, It should be stressed that the tubular expandible member surrounding the conduit is resilient not only along its cylindrical side surface, but also at its front end thereby acting as cushioning means while the syringe is introduced into the body cavity.

I wish to note that the term syringe as used above and in the following description and claims is intended to define devices of Whatever type by which it is possible to introduce liquid or liquids into a cavity of the human body.

It should also be noted that the term liquid as used above and in the following description and claims is intended to cover fluid of whatever type, as for instance, Water, disinfecting fluids, or fluids having medicinal properties.

Furthermore, it should be stressed that the term rubber as used above and in the following description and claims is intended to cover not only natural rubber, but also artificial rubber and other substances, e. g. plastics having rubberlike qualities, i. e. being resilient and expandible.

Finally, it should be stressed that the term cavity of the human body is to be understood broadly, i. e. not limited to certain cavities. Thus, my new syringe might very well be used s a f male douche, for introducing disinfecting however, both as to its construction and its method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, wi l be best understood from the followingdescription of specific embodiments when read inconnection with the accompanying drawings. in which:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal section through a syringe according to my present invention, in uninfiated inoperative condition;

Fig. .2 is a: longitudinal section through the syringe. shown in Fig. 1 in inflated operative condition;

Fig. 3 is aside view partly in longitudinal section of'a slightly'modified embodiment of a.syr-- inge of the type shown in Figs. 1 and 2;

Fig. 4 is a top viewof a modified syringe similarto theone shown in Figs. land 2;

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal section through thesyringe shown in Fig. 4; along line 55 of Fig. 4;

Fig. dis a side view partly in longitudinal section of a modified embodiment of the syringe shown iniFigs. 4 and 5;

Fig. '7' is a longitudinalsection of still another modified embodiment of a syringe according to' my present invention in operative condition;

Fig. 8 is a perspective viewiof the syringe shown in Fig. 7 in inoperative condition;

Fig; 9 .is a longitudinal section through the syrringe shown'iinFigs. 7 andr8, in. inoperative con dition;.

Fig. 10 is a longitudinal section through still a further modified embodiment of a syringe according to my present invention;

Fig'..l1is a perspective view of a combined liquid receptacle and cover for a syringe-of the type shown in Fig. 10 and Fig. 12 is aperspective view of the combined liquid receptacle and covershown in use.

The syringe shown in Figs. 1'and.2 comprises as main elements the tubular conduit 2!! surrounded by the resilient rubber tube 2lclosed at its front end22'and open=at its'rear end 23, the compressible rubber bulb 24 connectedas shown with therear end 2'3 of-the resilient rubber tube 21 and the ball-shaped rubber bulb 25 connected to the'rear' end ZB'ofthe tubular conduit '2 B'communicating with the same.

In accordance with my present invention, the conduit 20 consists of a relatively rigid material, e; g. so-called hard rubber, while the rubber tube 21 is made of a relatively soft," resilient material, e. g; soft'rubber; The rear part'of this rubber tube 2|, although'resilient, has toconsist of a substantially non-stretchable; non-expandible material, while the front end'2l ofthe rubber tube 2| consists ofan'expandible material, e. g. very thin rubber.

The rubber bulb 24', filled" with air; and the rubber bulb 25, adapted'to be filled with the liquid to be introduced, have both to be of compressible material of a type which .is resilient and shape re, taining, i. e. a material which returns after compression and release into. its original condition 'If a syringe of the above described type is compressed in direction of arrows 28, i. e. if pressure is exerted against the rubber bulb 24 in the direction indicated above, the air contained in rubber bulb 24 will be forced in direction of arrow 29 into the resilient rubber tube 2 I. As the rear portion of tube 2| is non-expandible, it will not change its shape by introduction of the air. Contrary thereto,-the front end portion 21 of the tube being expandible, it will beinfiated and'resume the shape shown in Fig. 2.

A syringe of the type described above operates as follows:

First, the ball-shaped rubber bulb 25 is filled with the liquid to be introduced, by immersing the front end 22 of the tubular conduit 2|] into the liquid and thereafter compressing and releasing bulb 25. After filling the bulb 25 in this manner with the liquid to be introduced the entire front part of the syringe, i. e. the tubular conduit 20 together with the surrounding resilient rubber tube 2| are introduced into the. cavity.- The next step in application of the syringecon sists in compressing the rubber'bu-lb 24; thereby inflating the front end portion 21'of the;:resilient rubber tube 2| as shown in Fig. Zand described: above. This inflationv will cause-expansionof the front end portion 21 which in.-=turn:will result-in a certain pressure against the walls of the cavity forcing the same apart and thereby smoothing the usuall unevensurface of-the' cavity, making it better accessible to theintroduced liquid; Thereafter, the ball-shaped rubber bulb. 25 is compressed, resulting in ejection of the liquid contained in the rubber bulb 25 through conduit 20 into the cavity, the wall surfacesof which have been smoothed in advance by action=of the expanded front end portion 2'|-of rubber. tube 2|: If desired, it is possible to moveduring-introduction of the liquid the entire syringe.slowly- -outward while keeping the front end portionilof the tube 2| expanded, thereby expanding; consecutive portions of the cavity; ensuring. complete wetting of all surface portions of thetsame.

InFigs. .3 to-l2 inclusive; I- have shown various modifications. of the syringe described aboveand shown in Figs. .1 and 2.= These. modifications :,.dif-- ferin various respects from the syringe shown in the mentioned figures and referred to. above;- however, all of them include. the basic features of my present invention, namely, atubular conduit,.a.closed resilient rubber tube. of the type defined above, meansfor inflating the. rubber tube andmeans for supplyingandforcing liquid through the tubular conduit.

The syringe shown in Fig. 3..is.very, similanto the ones shown in Figs. .1 and2; the only. differ.- ence is that instead of firmly securingthe-ballshaped rubber bulb 25to the syringe,.I. provide as shown a screwthreaded tubular. extension .30. firmly. secured to the rubber bulb 24 andcommunicating with the tubular conduit. 29. By means .of this screw threadedextension 30.1 at: tach the ball-shaped rubber bulb.3.| which .is provided also with a screw threaded extension 32" to the syringe. Thus, itis possible .to. unscrew the rubber bulb 3| for cleaning purposes, whenever required.

The syringe shown in Figs. 4 and '5 differs from the syringe shown in Fig. 3 only in theshape of the'rubber-bulb 24. Asshown; this bulbhas the shape of a rubber cushion-32'. A syringe-of this type is particularly adapted for-introduction of liquid into the. vaginal cavity. Itisused-by first introducing; into.- the vaginal; cayity the tubular conduit and the closed resilient rubber tube 2| and then-pressing with the thighs against the rubber cushions 32 without the necessity of any manual operation.

In the syringe shown in Fig. 6, the function of the rubber cushion and rubber ball are reversed compared with the syringe shown in Fig. 5: while in the syringe shown in Fig. 5 the rubber cushion 32 contains the air, the rubber cushion 33 shown in Fig. 6 is connected with the tubular conduit 34 at 35 and serves for holding the liquid to be supplied and forced through conduit 34; similarly, while the ball shaped rubber bulb Si in the syringe shown in Fig. 5 serves for holding the liquid to be introduced, the ball-shaped rubber bulb 36 of the syringe shown in Fig. 6 is connected at 38 with the closed resilient rubber tube 5;? communicating with the same and containing the air serving for inflating the front portion of tube 31. This syringe is used in the same way as the one shown in Fig. 5, the only difference being that after introduction of the protruding syringe portion first the front end of tube 3'! is inflated by manually compressing bulb 36 and then pressure is exerted by thethighs against the rubber cushion 33 so as to inject the liquid into the expanded vaginal cavity.

The syringe shown in Figs. 7 to 9 includes also a protruding syringe member of the type proposed by me. It includes also a rubber cushion comprising two separate cushion compartments 39 and 40. Cushion compartment 39 is air filled and communicates at 4| with the resilient rubber tube 42, while rubber compartment All is connected at 44 with the tubular conduit 43 communicating with the same. This compartment 48 is adapted to be filled with the liquid to be introduced into the vaginal cavity by means of the opening 44 which can be closed by the cap 45 as shown.

The syringe described in the preceding paragraph is used by first introducing into the body cavity, preferably the vaginal cavity, the protruding syringe portion consisting of the tubular conduit 43 and the resilient rubber tube 42 and then pressing first with one thigh against the cushion compartment 39, inflating thereby the front end portion of tube 42 and then pressing with the other thigh against the cushion compartment Ml, thereby compressing the same and forcing the liquid contained in it through conduit 43 into the expanded vaginal cavity.

I wish to note that the syringe shown in Figs. 7 and 9 and described in the preceding paragraphs the tubular conduit 43 is not rigid, but

flexible so as to be adapted to be folded as shown in Figs. 8 and 9. The operative position shown in Fig. 7 is obtained by exerting slight pressure against the cushion compartment 39.

The syringe shown in Figs. 10 to 12 differs in substantial respects from the syringe described in the preceding paragraph, but is nevertheless based on the same invention. This syringe also includes a tubular conduit 46 surrounded by a resilient rubber tube l! of the type defined above. The means for inflating the tube ll consists of a tubular rubber extension ii} attached directly to the rear end of tube 41, communicating with the same. Compression of this tubular rubber extension 48 results in expansion of the front end portion of tube 4! in the same way as described above in connection with other syringe constructions according to my present invention.

The tubular conduit 46 is connected at its rear end to one end of hose 49. This hose is provided at its other end with a screw threaded connecting sleeve 50 adapted to be screwed on a corresponding screw threaded tubular member 5| provided in a wall of the combined liquid container and cover '52. This combined liquid container and cover 52 preferably consists of a water impervious sheet material and can either be used as shown in Fig. 12 for holding the liquid to be introduced through conduit 46 into the body cavity, or, as shown in Figs. 10 and 11, as a cover holding the entire syringe.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above, or two or more together, may also find a useful application in other types of devices for introducing liquids into expandible cavities differing from the types described above.

While I have illustrated and described the invention as embodied in syringes for introducing liquids into body cavities, I do not intend to be limited to the details shown, since various modiiications and structural changes may be made without departing in any way from the spirit of my invention.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of my invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute essential characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention, and, therefore, such adaptations should and are intended to be comprehended within the meaning and range of equivalence of the following claims.

What claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A syringe for introducing liquid into a cavity of the human body comprising in combination a tubular conduit for introducing said liquid; an introducing opening at the front end of said tubular conduit; a rubber bulb adapted to be filled with said liquid for supplying said liquid and forcing the same into and through said tubular conduit, said rubber bulb being connected with the rear end of said tubular conduit; a closed rubber tube surrounding said tubular conduit and said introducing opening at the front end thereof and having at its front an expandible front portion equally expandible in transverse direction and surrounding said front end of said tubular conduit and said introducing opening at the front end thereof; and a closed air filled rubber member connected with said closed rubber tube for forcing air into said closed rubber tube so as to equally expand said expandible front port on at the front end of the same in transverse direct on, whenever required.

2. A syringe for introducing liquid into a cavity of the human body comprising in combination a tubular conduit for introducing said liquid; an introducing opening at the front end of said tubular conduit; a rubber bulb adapted to be filled with said liquid for supplying said liquid and forcing the same into and through said tubular conduit, said rubber bulb being connected with the rear end of said tubular conduit; a closed rubber tube surrounding said tubular conduit and said introducing opening at the front end thereof and extending rearwardly from said front end of the same, said closed rubber tube having an expandible front end portion equally expandible in transverse direction and surrounding said front end of said tubular conduit and said introducing opening at the front end thereof; and pump means connected with said closed rubber tube for forcing air into said closed rubber tube so as to equally inflate said expandible front end portion at the 7 front endof said closedrubber tube surrounding said front end of said tubular conduit, whenever required.

3'. A syringe for introducing liquid into a cavity of the human bOdy comprising in combination a tubular conduit for introducing said liquid; an introducing opening at the front end of said tubular conduit; a rubber bulb adapted to be fllled with said liquid for supplying said liquid and forcing the same into and through said tubular conduit, said rubber bulb being connected with the rear end of said tubular conduit; a closed rubber tube surrounding said tubular conduit and said "introducing opening at the front end thereof and extending rearwardly from said front end of the same, said closed rubber tube having an expandible front end portion equally expandible in transverse direction and surrounding said front end of said tubular conduit and said introducing opening at the front end thereof; and a closed air filled rubber cushion connected with said closed rubber tube for forcing air into said closed rubber tube so as to equally inflate said expandible front end portion at the front end of said closed rubber tube surrounding said front end of said tubular conduit, whenever required.

4. A syringe for introducing liquid into a cavity of the human body comprising in combination a tubular conduit for introducing said liquid; an introducing opening at the front end of said tubular conduit; a closed rubber cushion adapted to be filled with said liquid for supplying said liquid and forcing the same into and through said tubular conduit, said closed rubber cushion being connected with the rear end of said tubular conduit; a closed rubber tube surrounding said tubular conduit and said introducing opening at the front end thereof and extending rearwardly fromrsaidfront end of the same, said closed rubber tube, having anexpandible front end portion equally expandible in transverse direction and surrounding saidfront end of said tubular conduit and said introducing opening at the front end thereof; and a closed air filled rubber bulb connected with said closed rubber tube for forcing air into said closed rubber tube so as to equally inflate said expandible front end portion at the front end of said closed rubber tube surrounding said front end of said tubular conduit, whenever required.

5. A syringe for introducing liquid into a cavity of the human body comprising in combination a tubular conduit for introducing said liquid; an introducing opening at the front end of the tubular conduit; a first closed rubber cushion adapted to be filled with said liquid for supplying said liquid and forcing the same into and through said tubular conduit, said closed rubber cushion being connected with the rear end of said tubular conduit; a closed rubber tube surrounding said tubular conduit and said introducing opening at the front end thereof and extending rearwardly from said front end of the same, said closed rubber tube having an expandible front end portion equally expandible in transverse direction and surrounding said front end of said tubular conduit and said introducing opening at the front end thereof; and a second closed air filled rubber cushion connected with said closed rubber tube for forcing air into said closed rubber tube so as to equally inflate said expandible front end portion at the front end of said closed rubber tube surrounding said front end of said tubular conduit, whenever required.

OCTAVIO JOSE ALVAREZ.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the fiie of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 565,386 Meengs Aug. 4, 1896 2,128,977 Whitree Sept. 6, 1938 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 191,697 Great Britain July 26, 1923

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US565386 *Aug 23, 1895Aug 4, 1896 Rectal irrigating-dilator
US2128977 *Feb 11, 1936Sep 6, 1938Leonard L HarveySheath syringe
GB191697A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3050066 *Dec 31, 1958Aug 21, 1962Wilbur R KoehnRetention catheters
US3157180 *Apr 3, 1962Nov 17, 1964Bakunin Maurice ICatamenial receptacle
US4282873 *Apr 3, 1980Aug 11, 1981Roth Robert AMedical irrigation device
US5336203 *May 28, 1993Aug 9, 1994Abbott LaboratoriesLow profile gastrostomy device with dome
WO2005067999A2 *Jan 13, 2005Jul 28, 2005Centripeta LtdDevice for fluid delivery to an enclosed space
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/185, 604/212, 604/912, 604/182
International ClassificationA61M3/00, A61M3/02, A61M31/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M3/0295, A61M31/00, A61M3/0283
European ClassificationA61M31/00, A61M3/02H2, A61M3/02H8