Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2489054 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 22, 1949
Filing dateSep 7, 1946
Priority dateSep 7, 1946
Publication numberUS 2489054 A, US 2489054A, US-A-2489054, US2489054 A, US2489054A
InventorsJoseph V Sprolle
Original AssigneeNat Sugar Refining Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pallet
US 2489054 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PALLET Filed Sept. 7. 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR ATTORNEY J. V. SPROLLE Nov. 22, 1949 PALLET :5 Sheet-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 7, 1946 INVENTQR 1:. 84mm ATTORNEY Nov. 22, 1949 J. V.'SPROI LE V PALLET Filed Sept. 7, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR M4. v. M

R 7. M ATTORNEY Patented N 2 2 1 4 PALLET Joseph V. Sprolle,

It is known in the art of handling packages to stack a number of them on a pallet to form a socalled palletized unit which may be picked up by mechanical devices such as fork-lift trucks and carried to and from warehouses, freight cars and the like. This speeds up the handling, with a consequent reduction in costs, and also facilitates the efiective storing in warehouses and loading in conveyances. Pallets commonly used for this purpose have been made of wood and sometimes of fibre board; some consisting of a single plat= form with spacers or legs of some sort on the under side so that the forks of the truck may be inserted underneath the platform in order to lift the unit, while others have consisted of a double platform with spacers so that the forks may be inserted in between in order to lift the unit. Sometimes the packages have been secured to the wooden pallet, and at other times not. The cost of these and other pallets heretofore in use has been such that they have not been expendable. As a result, if they were to accompany shipments in order to avoid the cost of repalletizing at the destination, the expense of returning them would be involved.

The principal objects of the present invention are to provide an improved palletized package unit of simplified construction, formed with an improved pallet which is light in weight and isso inexpensive as to be economically expendable. The invention provides a palletized unit which may be shipped as such, thus affording an oppor-' tunity for more efilcient and efiective car loading, and may be removed and handled as such at the destination.

Other and further objects and features of the invention will appear or be pointed out hereinafter in the specification and claims.

I shall now describe my invention with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a somewhat diagrammatic perspective view of a completely assembled palletized package unit according to one embodiment of my invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged end elevational view of the lower portion of Fig. 1, designed to indicate the adhesive between the packages and between the packages and the pallet;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the pallet of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a somewhat diagrammatic perspective view of a completely assembled palletized package unit according to another embodiment of my in Forest Hills, N. Y., assignor to The National Sugar Refining Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New-Jersey Application September 1, 1946, Serial No. 695,385 7 4 Claims. (01. 206-46) vention, the dotted lines indicating the cs which in this embodiment extend out on all four sides of the pallet;

Fig. 5 is a bottom plan view of Fig. 4, the dotted lines indicating the packages which rest on the pallet between the side walls; I midi. 6 is a perspective view of the pallet of Fig. 7 is a somewhat diagrammatic perspective view of a completely assembled palletized package unit according to still another embodiment of my invention;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged end elevational view or the lower portion of Fig. '7, designed to indicate the adhesive between the packages and between the packages and the pallet; 7 Figdii is a perspective view oi the pallet of Fig.

. Fig. 10 is a perspective view of a pallet illustrating still another embodiment of invention.

Referring more particularly to said drawings and to the embent shown in Figs. 1 to 3. inclusive, the numeral it designates the pallet which is bent to provide vertical side walls ii and it having outwardly extending horizontal flanges it and id respectively. The pallet it according to the invention is formed of a single sheet of light-weight flexible composition material such as plain or corrugated fibre-board or the like.

The size of the pallet and the height of the side walls ii and 52 are so designed with respect to the particular packages to be palletized, that a layer of the packages may be laid on the pallet to fill out completely the space between the side walls and that the top of the layer will be in line with the top of the flanges l3 and II:

In building up the unit-adhesive is first applied to the bottom surface of the packages as, for example, by passing the packages over an adhesiveapplying roller or rollers. A layer l5 of the packages is then laid on and adhesively secured to the pallet. A second layer It is then laid on and adhesively secured to the first layer l 5. The packages of this second layer it are so disposed as to extend out over flanges layer is also adhesively secured. A third layer ii is then laid on and adhesively secured to the second layer I 6. Succeeding layers are laid on and secured in the same manner to the preceding layer.

In Fig. 2, an enlarged view, it; and I9 indicate the adhesive on the bottom of the packages in the lower layer of packages; 20, H and 22 indicate the adhesive on the bottom of the packages in the second layer; and 23, 24 and 2b indicate the adhesive l3 and M to which the on the bottom of the packages in the third layer. Succeeding layers are of course similar- Glue or any other suitable adhesive may be employed. The amount of adhesive to be used will depend, of course, upon the load to be carried by the particular units under consideration. It is not always necessary to cover the whole bottom of each package with adhesive, but is sometimes sumclent merely to apply several strips of adhesive thereto.

It will be observed that a unit of packages is built up having an overhang to the bottom of which the pallet flanges are secured, so that lifting points are provided underneath the flanges and thus underneath the overhang. This assembled unit is substantially rigid since all the packages are adhesively secured together and to the pallet including its flanges. The rigidity of the package unit tends to strengthen the pallet, and the pallet tends to strengthen the package unit.

In Figs. 4, and 6, I have illustrated the invention as applied to a fourway lift unit. Here. in addition to the vertical side walls II and I2 with their horizontal flanges I3 and I4 respectively, the pallet III is provided with vertical end walls 25 and 2 having longitudinal outwardly extending horizontal flanges 28 and 23 respectively. In order to show the shape of the blank from which the pallet is formed, the pallet in Fig. 6 is shown spread slightly open; but, when the unit is assembled, the edges of the side walls and flanges are moved into engagement as illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5 so as to form in effect a continuous flange extending around all four sides. By virtue of this construction, the forks of the lift truck may be inserted underneath the flanges from any one of four directions. By way of example, the packages shown in this embodiment of the invention are of diflerent size and shape, and are arranged difierently, from those illustrated in the embodiment of Figs. 1, 2 and 3.

In the embodiment illustrated in Figs. '7, 8

the other is formed of vertical side walls 33 and 34 connected by the flat horizontal bridge portion 35. The arches are of such height that the bridge portions thereof lie in the same plane as the flanges I3 and I4. Also this height corresponds to the height of the packages, so that when the first layer of packages is laid on the pallet between the arches, the top of this layer, the bridge portions 32 and 35, and the flanges I3 and M will all lie in the same horizontal plane. In this embodiment of the invention, the second layer of packages I6 is adhesively secured not only to the first layer I5 and the flanges I3 and I4, but

also to the bridge portions 32 and 35. This is in the preceding figures. Obviously, more or less than two arches may be provided if desired.

Fig. 10 illustrates the application of the fourway lift feature to the form of pallet having an intermediate arch. In this figure, as in Fig. 6, the pallet is shown as spread slightly apart in order that the shape of the blank will more clearly appear. A single arch is shown formed of the vertical side walls 48 and 31 connected by the flat horizontal top or bridge portion 0. At its ends the top portion 43 is provided with extended portions 49 and 50, which serve as part of the end flanges. Also, the two portions of the pallet III that lie between the arch and the side walls are provided at their ends with extended portions bent to form vertical end walls 5|, 52 and 53, 54 having longitudinal outwardly extending horizontal flanges 55, 56 and 51, 53 respectively. These flanges lie in the same horizontal plane as the flanges I3 and H. As will be evident, when the unit is assembled, the edges of the extended portions 49, 50 and the flanges I3, I4, 55, 56, 51, 53 will be moved into engagement so as to form in effect a continuous flange extending around all four sides.

In order to secure .the requisite stability and strength inthe palletized unit, at least some of the packages in the different layers should be so arranged as to extend across spaces between packages in preceding layers in order to provide an interlocking effect so as to prevent the sagging, buckling or spreading apart of the stack of packages. This interlock should be provided in both directions, that is, transversely and longitudinally of the pallet. Various arrangements of the packages may be used to accomplish the interlock. These arrangements will, of course, be influenced by the size and shape of the packages and the load to be carried. By way of exshown on an enlarged scale in Fig. 8, in which Thus the construction shown is designed to accommodate four lifting forks, since it is in all instances necessary that forks be placed under the flanges I3 and I4. Here again, by way of example, the packages shown in Fig. 7 are different in size. shape and arrangement from those shown ample, diiferent sizes and shapes of packages, and arrangements, have been illustrated in Figs. 1, 4 and '7 respectively.

It will be understood that in all embodiments of the invention the packages in each layer are adhesively secured to the packages in the preceding layer.

While I have shown and described the side walls as being of such height with respect to the dimensions of the packages that when a layer of packages is laid on the pallet between the side walls the top of the layer will be in line with the top of the flanges, it will be obvious that the height of the side walls could be made to correspond with the combined height of two or more layers of the packages without departing from the spirit of my invention.

By providing a pallet having the horizontal outwardly extending flanges, by filling the intermediate space on the pallet with packages up to the level of the flanges, by arranging the packages above this level so as to extend out over the flanges, by stacking the packages so as to interlock them, by adhesively securing the packages together and to the pallet including its flanges, a combination has been produced which permits the use of a pallet of the utmost simplicity formed merely of a single sheet of comparatively inexpensive light-weight flexible composition material. A mutual bracing and strengthening efiect is secured between the pallet and the packages which enables relatively heavy loads to be carried by such a pallet without sagging, buckling or spreading apart.

The term composition materla as used herein is intended to include not only plain and cor- 'rugated fibre-board but also any other sheet maother containers, of oblong generally-rectangular shape.

I claim:

1. A palletized package unit, including a pallet consisting of a sheet of composition material bent to provide side walls having outwardly extending flanges, packages having a height substantially equal to the height of said side walls laid on said sheet and substantially filling the space between said walls, a second layer of packages laid on and adhesively secured to said first-named packages and extending over and adhesively secured to said outwardly extending flanges, and additional layers of packages in turn laid on and adhesively secured to the immediately preceding layer, some packages of said layers extending transversely and some longitudinally of said sheet across spaces between the packages of a preceding layerj 2. A palletized package unit, including a pallet consisting of a sheet of composition material bent to provide side and end walls having outwardly extending flanges lying in a common plane, packages having a height substantially equal to the height of said side and end walls laid on said sheet and substantially filling the space between said walls, a second layer of packages laid on and adhesively secured to said first-named packages and extending over and adhesively secured to said outwardly extending flanges, and additional layers of packages in turn laid on and adhesively secured to the immediately preceding layer, some packages of said layers extending transversely and some longitudinally of said sheet across spaces between the packages of a preceding layer.

3. A palletized package unit, including a pallet consisting of a sheet of composition material bent to provide an intermediate flat-topped arch extending longitudinally thereof and side walls having outwardly extending flanges, said flanges lying substantially in the plane of the top of said arch, packages having a height substantially equal to the height of said side walls laid on said sheet and substantially filling the space between said walls, a second layer-of packages laid on and adhesively secured to said first-named packages and to the top of said arch and extending over and adhesively secured to said outwardly extending flanges, and additional layers of packages in turn laid on and adhesively secured to the immediately preceding layer, some packages of said layers extending transversely and some longitudinally of said sheet across spaces between the packages of a preceding layer.

4. A palletized package unit, including a pallet consisting of a sheet of composition material bent to provide side walls having outwardly extending flanges, packages having a height substantially 1 equal to the height of said side walls laid on said sheet and substantially filling the space between said walls, a second layer of packages laid on and adhesively secured to said first-named packages and extending over and adhesively secured to said outwardly extending flanges, and additional layers of packages in turn laid over and adhesively secured to the immediately preceding layer, the packages and pallet constituting a substantially rigid unit, and the outwardly extending flanges providing lifting points spaced from the bottom of said pallet.

JOSEPH V. SPROLLE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,922,560 Sullivan Aug. 15, 1933 2,256,024 Hill Sept. 16, 1941 2,328,397 Neum'an Aug. 31, 1943 2,412,184 Ulinski Dec. 3, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1922560 *Aug 29, 1930Aug 15, 1933Willard P SullivanHolder for bricks or the like
US2256024 *Nov 24, 1939Sep 16, 1941Hill IrvingApparatus for stacking articles
US2328397 *Mar 23, 1942Aug 31, 1943Jacob J NeumanThrow-away pallet
US2412184 *May 2, 1944Dec 3, 1946Yale & Towne Mfg CoPallet
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2564492 *Oct 18, 1946Aug 14, 1951Materials Handling Lab IncAdhesive applying machine
US2566385 *Jan 22, 1947Sep 4, 1951Patten Ernest W VanPackaged unit for article handling
US2578583 *Apr 13, 1949Dec 11, 1951Herbert J O'brienPackaging
US2630214 *Dec 1, 1949Mar 3, 1953Armco Steel CorpPallet-type brick package
US2662638 *Aug 18, 1949Dec 15, 1953Celanese CorpCarton
US2675123 *Oct 20, 1949Apr 13, 1954Baird Samuel PPackage of plurality of cartons and method of packaging
US2685398 *Apr 14, 1950Aug 3, 1954King Maxwell DMaterial containing or supporting means
US2703645 *Apr 1, 1948Mar 8, 1955Scrimshaw George WBox, package, and wrapper
US2793788 *Nov 4, 1954May 28, 1957Lysne Kenneth MPortable mortar container
US2873852 *Apr 29, 1957Feb 17, 1959Fred M BrackettMethod of packaging boards and package thereof
US2896798 *Nov 18, 1953Jul 28, 1959Owens Illinois Glass CoArticle handling pallet means
US2957668 *Apr 19, 1957Oct 25, 1960Martinson Machine CompanyMaterials handling pallet and method of making pallets
US3022906 *Jan 2, 1958Feb 27, 1962Anchor Hocking Glass CorpMethod and mechanism for handling articles
US3043450 *Nov 25, 1959Jul 10, 1962Owenscorning Fiberglas CorpExpendable pallet
US3242884 *Feb 1, 1965Mar 29, 1966Best Ronald FrederickPallet for stacking articles
US3247958 *Oct 7, 1963Apr 26, 1966Donald F DreherBrick package
US3376685 *Mar 21, 1966Apr 9, 1968American Handling Equipment CoBin cap
US3734280 *Dec 20, 1971May 22, 1973Procter & GambleShipping container for supporting and protecting a plurality of articles
US3853218 *Jan 30, 1973Dec 10, 1974Gilbert GLoad of goods comprising a plurality of layers, and a method and a machine for producing said load
US4036364 *Apr 8, 1976Jul 19, 1977Monsanto CompanyUnitized palletless load and method of forming same
US4165806 *Nov 7, 1977Aug 28, 1979Bud Antle, Inc.Palletizing system for produce cartons and the like
US4365710 *Nov 6, 1978Dec 28, 1982Champion International CorporationUnitized pallets
US4396122 *May 5, 1981Aug 2, 1983S.A. ThimonPackage for a pallet-less, multi-layer load comprising a layer of reduced width defining lateral spaces for gripping purposes
US4705162 *Nov 13, 1986Nov 10, 1987Kupersmit Julius BMultiple display carton shipping package
US5287963 *Aug 20, 1991Feb 22, 1994Tosh UmemotoIce enclosure
US6745544 *Apr 3, 2001Jun 8, 2004Matsumoto System Engineering Co., Ltd.Method of and apparatus for wrapping loadable objects
US7597053 *Feb 10, 2006Oct 6, 2009Sonoco Development, Inc.Appliance base rail with M-shaped profile
US8033726 *Oct 11, 2011LSI—Lift Systems IncorporatedBulk bag handling assembly
US20020020145 *Apr 3, 2001Feb 21, 2002Ryozo MatsumotoMethod of and apparatus for wrapping loadable objects
US20040123562 *Dec 17, 2003Jul 1, 2004Ryozo MatsumotoMethod of and apparatus for wrapping loadable objects
US20060175218 *Feb 7, 2006Aug 10, 2006Mctavish GordonBulk bag handling assembly
US20060180498 *Feb 10, 2006Aug 17, 2006Sonoco Development, Inc.Appliance base rail with m-shaped profile
US20060243172 *May 2, 2005Nov 2, 2006Simon Vaughn NUnique cardboard box container for replacing wood pallets
US20110139653 *Jun 16, 2011Randall James KleinsmithPanoramic product display assembly
DE1189458B *Dec 9, 1960Mar 18, 1965Toronto Brick Co LtdKastenfoermige Stapelunterlage zur Aufnahme der untersten Lage eines Stapels aus Ziegeln und aehnlichen Koerpern
DE3117929A1 *May 6, 1981Apr 29, 1982Thimon SaVerpackung fuer eine ladung ohne palette
WO2008098294A1 *Feb 14, 2008Aug 21, 2008Martin Daniel MurphyBlock pack forming method and apparatus
WO2011027325A1 *Sep 3, 2010Mar 10, 2011Stora Enso OyjPackage assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/386, 108/51.3
International ClassificationB65D71/00, B65D19/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D71/0096, B65D2519/00019, B65D2519/00562, B65D2571/00043, B65D2519/00318, B65D2519/00054, B65D2519/00288, B65D2571/00092, B65D2571/00061, B65D71/0092, B65D2519/00268, B65D2519/00333, B65D2519/00343, B65D2571/00067
European ClassificationB65D71/00P1A, B65D71/00P1