Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2489283 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 29, 1949
Filing dateSep 19, 1947
Priority dateSep 19, 1947
Publication numberUS 2489283 A, US 2489283A, US-A-2489283, US2489283 A, US2489283A
InventorsGarand John C
Original AssigneeUs Sec War
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bipod
US 2489283 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 29, 1949 J. c. GARAND 2,489,283

BIPOD Filed Sept. 19, 1947 2 Sheets-Sheet l all llu awe/Mm John Burundi.

Nov. 29, 1949 J. c. GARAND 2,489,283

BIPOD Filed Sept. 19, 1947 v 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 John B- Emil-LEI.

Patented Nov. 29, 1949 BIPOD John C. Garand, Springfield, Mass., assignor to V the United States of Americaas represented by the Secretary of War Application September 19, 1947, Serial No. 775,092

8 Claims. (Cl. 42-94) (Granted under the act of March 3, 1883, as

amended April 30, 1928; 370 O. G. 757) The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalty thereon.

2 -Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary view in section of the sleeve.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged partial side elevational view of the bipod.

This invention relates to a support for a fire- 5 Fig. '7 is an enlarged detail plan view of the arm and more particularly to an improved light latch. bipod rest especially adapted for use with rifles Fig. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary front view and light machine guns. of the intersection of the bipod legs showing the The exigencies of modern combat demand position of the cam slots when the legs are spread that bipods be securely locked in both their 0 apart in the operative position. operating and stowed positions and yet be adapt- Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8 but taken ed for a rapid change from one position to the when the legs are folded together as in the other. Such requirements have been accomstowed position. plished in the art but involve undesirable Fig. 10 is a perspective view of the connecting and time-consuming adjustment. Moreover member. the presence of such features adds considerably As shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 6, the bipod of this to the weight of the entire bipod and decreases invention is mounted to the conventional bayonet the simplicity of construction. lug I0 found in the U. S. rifle, cal. .30, M1 on the It is therefore an object of this invention to underside of the gas cylinder II which is in turn provide a simple, light-weight yet sturdily consecured beneath the firearm barrel [2. Howstructed firearm bipod having positive automatic ever, it should be understood that this bipod is means for locking such bipod in either the operadapted for use with any rifle or light machine ating or stowed positions. gun intended to be fired in the prone position. It is also essential that the vertical height of If the weapon is not provided with a bayonet bipods be readily adjustable and securely locked lug, any similar lug or bracket which depends in all positions of adjustment. Prior art heightfrom the barrel or other convenient portion of adjusting means are too often disturbed by the the firearm may be used to mount the bipod vibration encountered in the continued firing thereon. of automatic weapons. In any event, there is here provided a mount- Accordingly, it is a further object of this ining bracket l3 having an undercut groove M vention to provide a firearm bipod having heighttherein and a latch [5 associated with mountadjusting means arranged to automatically look ing bracket l3 and arranged to be biased upin the position seleeted- Wardly by a torsion spring It so as to project It is still a further object of this invention to i front of the mouth of groove M. The top provide a bipod adapted for rapid removal from surface of mounting bracket 13 projects slightly a firearm or equally rapid assembly thereto rebeyond the rear face thereof and thereby serves gardless of the position of the bipod legs at to limit the upward movement of latch I 5. Thus that time. when groove I4 surrounds bayonet lug l0, as The specific nature of the invention as well -4 shown in Fig. 6, latch l5 secures mounting brackas Other je ts and adva a es th Wil et [3 to the firearm until such latch is depressed clearly appear froma description of a preferred downwardly against the bias of spring l6. 'It embodiment as shown in the accompanying should be also noted that mounting bracket l3 drawings in which: is adapted to be latched or unlatched from Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of the bipod bayonet lug l0 regardless of the position of the of this invention S ow in the Operating and remainder of the bipod; The rearface' of st w positions w t respect to a fi mounting bracket I3 is provided with a depend- Fig. 2 is an enlarged sectionalized view of the ing integral lug 1 having a bifurcated portion mounting bracket assembled to the locking 3 t t tt thereof, bracket. "5 A locking bracket I9 is plvotally secured to Fig. 3 is a rear elevational view of the bipod mounting bracket 13 by a pin 20 for movement in shown in the operating position with respect to a plane at right angles to'the longitudinal axis of the firearm. the firearm. A shoulder 2| is provided on lock- Fig. 4 is an enlarged rear end sectionalized ing bracket I 9 and'arranged to contact the unview of one of the-feet of the bipod legs. '55 derside of mounting bracketl3so as to limit the axis of the firearm.

ing member 21.

extent to which the former, and consequently the entire bipod, can be transversely pivoted with respect to the firearm. Such construction, however, allows sufficient transverse pivotal movement of the firearm for correcting any cant in the line of sight thereof which may occur when the bipod is standing on uneven terrain. Locking bracket I9 is bifurcated as shown at 22 in Fig. 1. A transverse pin 29 is provided in bracket |9 vertically below shoulder 2| and passing through bifurcation 22 for a purpose to be later described. A forward transverse notch 23 vertically below pin 29 and a transverse notch 24 rearwardly disposed from notch 23 are provided on bracket I9 as well as a sloping cam surface 25 and a rearwardly extending projection 26.

A connecting member 21 is provided with a substantially rectangular stem portion 28, the upper end of which fits into bifurcation 22 and is pivotally joined to locking bracket H] by pin 29 so as-to permit swinging movement of connecting member 21 in a plane parallel to the longitudinal Integral with stem portion 28 there is provided a cylindrical base portion 39, the top of which seats a coil spring 3| mounted to surround the adjacent section of stem portion 28. Base portion 39 is bifurcated as shown at 32 in Fig. and a slot 33 extends through base portion 30so as to intersect bifurcation 32 at right angles.

A sleeve member 34 is slidably mounted over connecting member 21 by means of a pin 35 extending through slot 33. The top edge of sleeve member 34 is bent inwardly at right angles to form a rim 36. When sleeve member 34 is assembled to connecting member 2], spring 3| is compressed between the top of base portion 39 and the underside of rim 3B and thereby normally urges sleeve 34 upwardly with respect to connect- Extending upwardly from rim 39 are a pair of detents 31 arranged to project into notches 23 and 24. The outer surface of sleeve member 34 is grooved as shown at 38 to provide a gripping surface for manual movement of such member.

A pair'of bipod legs 39 are pivotally secured within bifurcated portion 32 of connecting member '21 by a pin 40 fixedly secured as by staking or the like through the lower end of base portion 30. Legs 39 are thereby arranged to pivot toward and away from one another in a plane at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the firearm to which the bipod ismounted. At the top portion of each leg 39 there is provided a V-shaped cam slot 4| having one arm portion 42 relatively longer than the other arm portion 43. When legs 39 are pivotally mounted to base portion 39, cam slots 4| face in opposite directions but nevertheless are aligned sufficiently to provide openings through which pin 35 extends, as shown in Figs. 3 and 6. Theextreme end of each of longer arm portions 42 is slightly enlarged as shown at 44.

Each bipod leg 39 terminates at its lower end in an arcuately-formed spade-like foot 45 having a bent-over portion 46 extending downwardly with respect to the plane surface of foot 45. Legs 39 are preferably stamped or pressed from sheet stock as a single unit. Such method of fabrication not only assures a light weight, sturdy construction but also lends itself to simplicity in manufacture.

When bipod legs 39 are in the spread apart and operative position, the enlarged ends 44 of slot portions 4'2 are aligned as shown in Fig. 8 to form an opening for the seating therein of pin 35.

Spring 3| maintains such arrangement and thereby prevents accidental displacement of legs 39 from such position. At the same time, detents 31! are engaged in either notch 23 or notch 24 to lock the bipod in the operative position. However, when legs 39 are forced together, cam slots 4| pivot to align the shorter slot portions 43 into a unitary track. Pin 35 is therefore cammed downwardly with respect to locking bracket |9 by the diverging movement of longer slot portions 42 so as to ride along shorter slot portions 43. This downward movement of pin 35 causes sleeve 34 to retract detents 31 out of engagement with notch 23 or 24 thereby permitting swinging movement of legs 39 in a plane parallel to the longitudinal axis of the firearm. When legs 39 are released from being grasped, the bias of spring 3| forces sleeve 34 and'thereby pin 35 upwardly and pivots cam slots 4| so that pin 35 seats in the aligned enlarged ends 44 of slot portions 42.

To stow the bipod, legs 39 are folded together as explained above and are swung rearwardly until detents 31 are engaged behind projections 26. During such movement, detents 31 ride along sloping cam surface 25 and, as a result, sleeve member 34 and consequently pin 35 are cammed downwardly to compress spring 3|. Sleeve member 34 is maintained in such position by the abutment of detents 3'l against the rear face of locking bracket I9. It can thus be seen that legs 39 are maintained in a locked and stowed position and can only be released by the manual retraction of sleeve member 34 from behind projections 25. Furthermore, in such stowed position, the stem portion 28 of connecting member 21 is engaged between'the bifurcated portion l8 of lug As a result, mounting bracket I3 is rigidly locked against movement with respect to the rest of the bipod.

When sleeve member 34 is manuall retracted and the bipod legs 39 pushed forwardly, the bias of spring 3| will cause detents 31 to ride along cam surface 25 until aligned with rearward transverse notch 24 whereupon detents 31 automatically engage therein and lock the bipod in this first operating position.

Although legs 39 are cammed apart during such movement, the longitudinal axis thereof is angularly disposed with respect to the longitudinal axis of the firearm. To increase the vertical elevation of thefirearm, sleeve member 34 must again be manually retracted and legs 39 swung forwardly so that detents 31 will engage forward transverse notch 23. In such position, legs 39 willbe disposed substantially at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the firearm and thereby provide the maximum vertical height in which the bipod can support the firearm. The forward swinging of connecting member 2? and thereby sleeve member 34 is limited by the contact of the top of stem portion 28 with the underside of the bifurcated portion 22 of locking bracket l9.

It should be noted that when sleeve member 34 has been pivoted so that detents 3'! engage notch 24, stem portion 28 of connecting member 21 is no longer engaged in the bifurcated portion l8 of mounting bracket lug [1. Accordingly, mounting bracket l3 and thereby the firearm can be transversely pivoted to correct any cant in the line of sight.

The construction of the bipod is also such that sleeve member 34 can be retracted by merely pressing legs 39. together from the spread apart operative position. This movement causes cam slots 4! to cam pin 35 and thereby sleeve member 34 downwardly. Thus, except for the manual retraction of sleeve member 34' required to disengage detents 37 from behind projections 26, the bipod can be locked in either of its two operating positions or the stowed position. It can also be retracted merely by moving legs 39 as explained above.

Thus it can be readily seen that there is here provided a simple, light-weight, sturdy bipod which can be rapidly adjusted between a stowed position and either of two operating positions and be automatically locked in each of such positions.

I claim:

1. The combination with a firearm of a bipod support comprising, a latching member arranged to be removably mounted on a projecting lug of the firearm, a locking bracket pivotally mounted on said latching member for transverse movement with respect to the longitudinal axis of the firearm, a connecting member pivotally mounted at one end to said locking bracket for swinging movement between an operative position substantially at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the firearm to a stowed position substantially parallel therewith, a pair of legs pivotally mounted on said connecting member for movement toward and away from one another in a plane substantially at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the firearm, spring biased detent means slidably mounted on said connecting member and engageable with said locking bracket in the operating or stowed position of said legs, and cam means in said legs and means connected to said connecting member and cooperating with said cam means to retract said detent means from looking engagement with said locking bracket when said legs are pivoted toward one another.

2. In a bipod support for a firearm, means for locking the support in a stowed position relative to the firearm, said locking means comprising, latching means for removably mounting said bipod support beneath the firearm, a bracket mounted on said latching means and having a rearwardly extending projection, a connecting member pivotally mounted at one end to said bracket, a leg unit pivotally mounted on the other end of said connecting member, a sleeve member sildably mounted over said connecting member, detent means projecting up from the top of said sleeve member and arranged to fit behind said bracket projection when said connecting member is pivoted rearwardly, and spring means in said sleeve member for continually urging contact of said detent means against the rear face of said bracket behind said bracket projection thereby releasably locking said leg unit in a stowed position with respect to the firearm.

3. In a bipod support for a firearm, means for locking the support in one of a plurality of operating positions, said locking means comprising, latching means for removably mounting said bipod support beneath the firearm, a bracket mounted on said latching means and having a plurality of notches on the underside thereof, a connecting member pivotally mounted at one end to said bracket, a leg unit pivotally mounted on the other end of said connecting member, a sleeve member slidably mounted over said connecting member, a detent means projecting up from the top of said sleeve member and arranged to fit into said notches, and spring means in said sleeve member for urging said detent means into either of said notches when pivoted into alignment therewith, all adapted and arranged whereby said leg unit is releasably locked in an operating position with respect to the firearm.

4. In a bipod support for a firearm, a pair of legs arranged to pivot so as to form a divergent angle therebetween, pivot means for swinging said legs between an inoperative stowed position an an operative position wherein said legs are substantially at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the firearm, a sleeve member slidably mounted on said pivot means, spring-biased detent means projecting up from the top of said sleeve member, and a locking bracket pivotally mounted on one end of said pivot means, said bracket having a plurality of notches on the underside thereof and a rearwardly extending projection, said notches disposed at varying positions from the pivot point of said pivot means and said locking bracket and arranged to engage said detent means whereby said legs are maintained in a plurality of operating positions of varying elevations with respect to the firearm, said projection arranged to extend in front of said detent means for releasably locking said legs in the stowed position.

5. In a bipod support having means for latching to a firearm, a locking bracket mounted on the latching means, a connecting member pivotally mounted at one end to said bracket, a pair of legs pivotall mounted to the other end of said connecting member and arranged for converging and diverging movement with respect to one another, each of said legs having a cam slot adjacent the top end thereof, a spring biased sleeve member slidably secured to said connecting member, a transverse pin extending through said sleeve member and arranged to extend through said cam slots, and detent means on said sleeve member arranged to engage with said locking bracket, all adapted and arranged whereby movement 0. said legs pivots said cam slots to cam said transverse pin for eifecting movement of said sleeve member whereby said detent means are moved in and out of engagement with said looking bracket.

6. In a bipod support having means for latching on a firearm, a locking bracket mounted on the latching means, a connecting member pivotally mounted at one end to said locking bracket for movement in a plane parallel to the longitudinal axis of the firearm, a pair of legs pivotally mounted on the other end of said connecting member and arranged for diverging movement with respect to one another, each of said legs having a substantially V-shaped cam slot adjacent the top end thereof, said legs arranged in a side-byside relationship whereby said V-shaped cam slots face in opposite directions, each of said cam slots having one arm terminating in an enlarged portion relative to the width thereof, said enlarged portiors aligned to form an opening when said legs diverge, a sleeve member slidably secured to said connecting member, a transverse pin fixedly mounted in said sleeve member and arranged to extend through said opening formed by said enlarged cam slot ends, whereby said legs are releasably secured in the operative position.

7. In a bipod support having means for latching on a firearm, a locking bracket mounted on the latching means, said locking bracket having a rearwardly extending projection, a connecting member pivotally mounted at one end of said locking bracket and adapted for movement in a plane parallel to the longitudinal axis of the firearm, a pair of legs pivotally mounted on the other end of said connecting member adapted and arranged for converging movem'entlin a-pla'n'e substantially at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the firearm, each of said legs having a substantially V-shaped cam slot adjacent the top end thereof, said legs arranged in a side-by-side rellationship whereby said V-shaped cam slots face in opposite directions'and align to form a unitary track portion when said legs converge, a sleeve member slidably secured to said connecting member, a spring in said sleeve member arranged to urge said sleeve member upwardly, a transverse pin fixedly mounted in said sleeve member and arranged to extend through said cam slot unitary track portion, and detent means on the top of said sleeve member for engagement behind said bracket projection, all adapted and arranged whereby said detent means prevent movement of said legs in a plane parallel to the longitudinal axis of the firearm and the engagement of said transverse pin in said unitary track formed by said cam slots prevents movement of said legs in a plane disposed substantially at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the firearm.

8. The combination with a firearm of a bipodsupport comprising, latching means for removably mounting said bipod support beneath the firearm, bracket means pivotally secured to said latching means for transverse movement with respect to REFERENCES CITED The following references are of recordin the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Y Date 1,033,624 Schm'eisser July 23,1912 1,382,409 Butler June '21, 1921 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 5,897 Great Britain of 1915 9,268

Great Britain "of 1913

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1033624 *Jul 21, 1911Jul 23, 1912Louis SchmeisserGun-support.
US1382409 *Jan 30, 1919Jun 21, 1921Newton D BakerBipod rest for firearms
GB191309268A * Title not available
GB191505897A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2775052 *Nov 21, 1952Dec 25, 1956Dietsch Francis WBipod and face shield for a rifle
US4641451 *Sep 11, 1984Feb 10, 1987Gerald HarrisBipod mounting device and muzzle brake
US4776124 *Sep 8, 1987Oct 11, 1988Clifton Oland BRetractable rifle support
US4903425 *Feb 3, 1989Feb 27, 1990Gerald HarrisPivotal adapter for bipods and attachment therefor
US5074188 *Dec 19, 1990Dec 24, 1991Gerald HarrisA firearm
US5194678 *Jan 27, 1992Mar 16, 1993Terry KramerFirearm rest
US5852892 *Sep 8, 1997Dec 29, 1998Steyr-Daimler-Puch AgRifle with bipod
US6772549 *Jun 15, 2001Aug 10, 2004Todd J. MuhlesteinFirearm leveler and stabilizer
US6843015 *May 13, 2003Jan 18, 2005Ronnie L. SharpBipod for firearms
US6929555 *May 9, 2002Aug 16, 2005D. Herbert MortonCue stick bridge support
US7222451 *Feb 14, 2005May 29, 2007Da KengQuick disconnect bipod mount and clamp assembly
US7401431 *Dec 22, 2004Jul 22, 2008Outback Concepts, LlcTrigger actuated stabilization device
US7409791Feb 8, 2008Aug 12, 2008Grip Pod Systems, L.L.C.Vertical fore grip with bipod
US7412793Mar 7, 2008Aug 19, 2008Grip Pod Systems, L.L.C.Vertical fore grip with bipod
US7421815 *Dec 1, 2006Sep 9, 2008Grip Pod Systems, L.L.C.Canting vertical fore grip with bipod
US7490429Jul 13, 2006Feb 17, 2009Grip Pod Systems, L.L.C.Vertical fore grip with bipod
US7559167Oct 12, 2007Jul 14, 2009Grip Pod Systems, LlcDual light rails and accessory rail mounts for vertical foregrips
US7568304Jan 11, 2007Aug 4, 2009Grip Pod System, LlcLight rail and accessory rail mount for vertical fore grip
US7610711Jul 17, 2006Nov 3, 2009TDI Arms, Ltd.Telescoping leg
US7614174 *May 31, 2006Nov 10, 2009Kasey Dallas BeltzBipod firearm support
US7631455 *Feb 14, 2005Dec 15, 2009Da KengQuick disconnect bipod mount assembly with adjustable and lockable tilt, pan and cant controls
US7658029Jan 23, 2009Feb 9, 2010Grip Pod Systems, L.L.C.Vertical fore grip with bipod
US7658030Jun 25, 2008Feb 9, 2010Grip Pod Systems, LlcVertical fore grip with bipod
US7665239 *Jan 5, 2007Feb 23, 2010Grip Pod Systems, L.L.C.Canting, tilting and rotating vertical fore grip
US7665241Jul 8, 2008Feb 23, 2010Eldad OzFirearm handgrip with a horizontal angle tracking bipod
US7669357May 30, 2008Mar 2, 2010Grip Pod Systems, LlcRotating and canting vertical fore grip with bipod
US7685756May 2, 2008Mar 30, 2010Grip Pod Systems, LlcVertical fore grip with bipod
US7743545Nov 9, 2007Jun 29, 2010Grip Pod Systems, LlcVertical foregrip leg extender
US7793454Oct 20, 2009Sep 14, 2010Kasey Dallas BeltzBipod firearm support
US7841122 *Jul 21, 2008Nov 30, 2010Phoenix Tactical, LLCAdaptable leg support for bipod assemblies
US7861451Nov 2, 2007Jan 4, 2011Grip Pod Systems, LlcFolding stack plate for foregrips
US7861452Sep 18, 2009Jan 4, 2011Grip Pods Systems, LLCVertical foregrip leg extender
US7891126Apr 4, 2008Feb 22, 2011Grip Pod Systems, LlcCanting vertical fore grip with bipod
US7900390Jul 24, 2009Mar 8, 2011Grip Pod Systems, LlcLight rail and accessory rail mount for vertical fore grip
US7987623Aug 13, 2010Aug 2, 2011Grip Pod Systems, LlcFolding stack improvements
US7987625Dec 30, 2010Aug 2, 2011Grip Pod Systems, LlcVertical foregrip leg extender
US8028457Feb 5, 2010Oct 4, 2011Grip Pod Systems, L.L.C.Folding stack plate for foregrips
US8069603Aug 28, 2009Dec 6, 2011Grip Pod Systems, LlcCanting vertical fore grip with bipod
US8136284Oct 7, 2010Mar 20, 2012Grip Pod Systems, LlcFolding stack plate for foregrips
US8156676Dec 11, 2009Apr 17, 2012Moody Joseph RIntegral weapon rapid deployment monopod
US8225543Jun 16, 2011Jul 24, 2012Grip Pod Systems International, LlcCanting vertical fore grip with bipod
US8341864Jan 22, 2010Jan 1, 2013Grip Pod Systems International, LlcVertical fore grip with bipod
US8341865Feb 5, 2010Jan 1, 2013Grip Pod Systems International, LlcVertical fore grip with bipod
US8341866Oct 21, 2011Jan 1, 2013Grip Pod Systems International, LlcFlip attachment adapters, devices, systems and methods for firearms
US8393104Jan 7, 2011Mar 12, 2013Grip Pod Systems International, LlcFolding stack improvements
US8402684Aug 26, 2011Mar 26, 2013Kasey Dallas BeltzBipod firearm support
US8443538Jan 20, 2012May 21, 2013Joseph MoodyIntegral weapon rapid deployment monopod
US8607491Feb 22, 2010Dec 17, 2013Grip Pod Systems International, LlcVertical fore grip with rotating and/or canting and/or tilting
EP0088011A1 *Feb 22, 1983Sep 7, 1983Thomson-BrandtLight mortar
EP0191754A2 *Feb 10, 1986Aug 20, 1986BÍHLER PNEUMATIK INTERNATIONAL GESELLSCHAFT m.b.H.Gun, in particular of the mortar type
EP1746378A1 *Jul 18, 2006Jan 24, 2007T.D.I. Arms Ltd.Telescoping leg
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/94
International ClassificationF41A23/08, F41A23/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A23/08
European ClassificationF41A23/08