Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2489791 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 29, 1949
Filing dateOct 16, 1944
Priority dateOct 16, 1944
Publication numberUS 2489791 A, US 2489791A, US-A-2489791, US2489791 A, US2489791A
InventorsLewis R Liles, Edgar W Chapman
Original AssigneeGoodrich Co B F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Printer's blanket
US 2489791 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV, 29, 1949 LlLEs T 2,489,791

PRINTERS BLANKET Filed Oct. 16, 1944 jL/EE'IZ 1 271 15 Jean's El 2 [as ,..:f.z;z LI -5h? -r 5.2::

Patented Nov. 29,1949

PBINTERS BLANKET Lewis B. Liles, Cuyahoga Falls, and Edgar W. Chapman, Akron, Ohio, assignors to The B. F. Goodrich Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application October 18, 1944, Serial No. 558,824

6 Claims. (Cl. 154-545) 1 This invention relates to printers blankets and is especially useful in the manufacture of blankets for offset printing.

Heretofore difllculty has been experienced in providing an offset blanket which was free from 5 stretch and which at the same time provides the proper surface for taking the ink, the proper resilience required in printing, and the uniform flexibility necessary to permit mounting of the blanket about a cylindrical platen. Some of these diillculties have also been experienced in the manufacture of printers blankets other than the offset type.

In the offset printing process, an offset blanket having an impression face is drawn tightly about a cylindrical platen and the ends of the blanket are clamped to the platen by metal clamp strips and bolts passing through the clamp strips and the ends of the blanket. Cylindrical printing plates are mounted on a roller so as to have rolling engagement with the face of the blanket to transfer an ink impression thereto. The material to be printed is passed in sheet form in contact with the inked blanket and lifts the ink from the blanket. The printing process is continuous so that the printing plates contact intermittently with the deposited impression on the blanket and any shifting of the blanket such as would occur by stretching of the blanket would result in a smudged impression requiring the press to be stopped and the blanket cleaned. It has been found that where a press stands idle over night, shifting of the blanket due to stretch usually results and requires cleaning and adjustment of the blanket before continuing use. It has been found necessary to employ a blanket of considerable flexibility so that it accommodates itself perfectly to the supporting cylinder and attempts heretofore to utilize a blanket containing relatively nonstretchable sheet or woven metallic materials have unduly stiffened the blanket and destroyed its flexibility. Blankets reinforced heretofore with cellulosic fabrics such as cotton or rayon have had the objection of being unduly stretchable.

The tensioning of the blankets tends to shear the blanket between the attaching apertures therein and the ends of the blanket so that high resistance to shear is required at the'ends of the blanket while at the same time uniformity of flexibility is required of the blanket from endto end.

Furthermore, it is desirable for the maker to supply blanket material in long lengths from which the blankets are cut for use. requiring uni- 2 formity of construction throughout a roll of blanket material.

The principal objects of the present invention are to avoid stretch of the blanket without interfering with the desirable flexibility and resilience, and to provide resistance to shear about fastening means with resistance to stretch.

These and other objects will be apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings.

Of the drawings,

Fig. 1 shows a perspective view of a portion of an offset blanket constructed in accordance with and embodying the invention, the blanket being broken away in steps to show its construction.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a cylindrical press platen having a blanket secured thereabout.

Fig. 3 is a plan view of a portion of a layer of glass fabric.

Referring to the drawings, the numeral l designates a blanket cylinder formed with a cylindrical surface 2 for supporting a blanket 3. The cylinder is provided with an axial gap 4 into which the ends of the blanket are turned and secured by metal clamp bars 5, 5, and bolts 8, 8 passing through the bars and the blanket to tension bars 6, 6, which are adapted to be drawn into the gap by screws 1, I to tension the blanket. The offset blanket 3 has a printing face or impression layer l0 which is of soft vulcanized rubber or other rubber-like material having the properties of resilience. resistance to the chemical action of ink and solvents used for removing ink, and also the property of being attractive to ink or of being wet thereby. Synthetic rubber compositions and plasticized polymerized vinyl chloride compositions have been found to have. desirable properties for this purpose, although compositions of natural rubber or other rubber-like ma terials may be used for the impression layer. Material suitable for the impression layer is described and identified for example in Patent No. 2,271,125 to A. E. Juve.

For flexibly supporting the printing face without interfering unduly with its flexibility, a backlug I l of woven cellulosic material such as square woven cotton or rayon fabric united by rubber or other rubber-like material is secured to the lower face of the impression layer and at least one layer I2 of the backing is formed of glass in the form of filamentary glass elements IZA spun in'to substantially inextensibie yarns I2B to provide resistance to stretch both laterally and iongitudinally of the blanket, and preferably woven to provide a fabric. Such glass material is commercialiy known as "Fiber glass" and is illustrated in Fig. 3. In the backing shown, a layer ll of prestretched square woven fabric of cotton or rayon forms the foundation layer and a layer ll of similar material forms the top layer of the backing and is bonded to the impression layer. The layer I2 of fiber glass is located between the layers 13 and I4 and is separated therefrom and bonded thereto by thin layers l5, l6 of rubber or other rubber-like material which unites the fabric layers to each other through the meshes of the fiber glass and provides a cushioning of the fabric layer which permits bending of the blanket, the rubber-like material permitting longitudinal creep of the layers with respect to each other during bending. While rubber-like materials do not ordinarily adhere readily to materials such as glass, it has been discovered by us that where the glass is of filaments forming spun yarns and woven as a fabric, the adhering of the rubber-like material to the fabric is amply sufficient for the purpose and while glass is ordinarily considered a brittle material, nevertheless in the form of woven filamentary glass elements it is free from brittleness and is highly flexible in all directions while providing great resistance to stretch. All the woven layers have their warp and filler elements extending respectively lengthwise and crosswise of the blanket. The square woven fabric at each side of the fiber glass layer protects it from accidental injury and prevents shear of the blanket about bolt holes while the fiber glass layer provides great resistance to stretch of the blanket. All of the layers of the blanket are adhered to each other and united by vulcanization of the rubber-like material, the layers being assembled and united under pressure by application of heat.

In use, the blanket is secured about the cylinder l of the press by bolts 8, B secured through openings 20 punched at intervals through the ends of the blanket to receive the bolts 8. The use of cotton or other fabric at each face of the layer of fiber glass reinforces the fiber glass against shearing and separating between the bolt holes and the margin of the blanket adjacent thereto.

While only one layer of fiber glass is shown in the illustrative embodiment, one or more such layers may be employed, preferably with all of the layers of fiber glass located between piles of fabric.

Variations may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as it is defined by the following claims.

We claim:

1. A printers blanket uniform in flexibility and highly stretch-resistant in a direction of the blanket for resisting objectionable deformation in the use thereof, said blanket comprising a resilient impression layer of ink-retainable material having the physical properties of soft, vulcanized rubber resistant to the chemical action of ink materials and solvents, and a flexible backing integral with said impression layer, said backing comprising stretch-resistant material including glass in filamentary form extending along the blanket in said direction thereof.

2. A printers blanket uniform in flexibility and highly stretch-resistant in a direction of the blanket for resisting objectionable deformation in the use thereof, said blanket comprising a resilient impression layer of ink-retainable material having the physical properties of soft, vulcanized rubber resistant to the chemical action of ink ma- 4 terials and solvents, and a flexible backing integral with said impression layer, said backing comprising stretch-resistant material including glass in filamentary elements twisted together to provide tension members extending along the blanket in said direction thereof.

3. A printer's blanket uniform in flexibility and highly stretch-resistant in a direction of the blanket for resisting objectionable deformation in the use thereof, said blanket comprising a resilient impression layer of ink-retainable material having the physical properties of soft, vulcanized rubber resistant to the chemical action of ink materials and solvents, and a flexible backing integral with said impression layer, said backing comprising stretch-resistant material including glass in filamentary elements twisted together as yarns and woven in fabric form to provide tension members extending along the blanket in said direction thereof.

4. A printers blanket uniform in flexibility and highly stretch-resistant in a direction of the blanket for resisting objectionable deformation in the use thereof, said blanket comprising a resilient impression layer of ink-retainable material having the physical properties of soft, vulcanized rubber resistant to the chemical action of ink materials and solvents, and a flexible backing integral with said impression layer, said backing comprising stretch-resistant material including glass in filamentary form extending along the the blanket in said direction thereof, and a layer of woven cellulosic material adjaceent said stretch-resistant material and adhered thereto providing resistance of the blanket to shearing stress.

5. A printers blanket uniform in flexibility and highly stretch-resistant in a direction of the blanket for resisting objectionable deformation in the use thereof, said blanket comprising a resilient impression layer of ink-retainable material having the physical properties of soft, vulcanized rubber resistant to the chemical action of ink materials and solvents, and a flexible backing integral with said impression layer, said backing comprising stretch-resistant material including glass in filamentary form extending along the blanket in said direction thereof and layers of woven cellulosic material above and below said stretch-resistant material and adhered thereto providing resistance of the blanket to shearing stress.

6. A printers blanket uniform in flexibility and highly stretch-resistant in a direction of the blanket for resisting objectionable deformation in the use thereof, said blanket comprising a resilient impression layer of ink-retainable material having the physical properties of soft, vulcanized rubber resistant to the chemical action of ink materials and solvents, and a flexible backing integral with said impression layer, said backing comprising stretch-resistant material including glass in filamentary form extending along the blanket in said direction thereof and layers of woven cellulosic material above and below said stretch-resistant material and adhered thereto providing resistance of the blanket to shearing stress, said cellulosic material comprising square woven cotton fabric secured to said stretch-resistant material by rubber-like material.

LEWIS R. LILES. EDGAR W. CHAPMAN.

(References on following page) 5 m Number R ENCES CITED 2,133J83 The following references are of record in the 2,135,057 file of this patent: 2,184,326 UNITED sums PATENTS 6 2,271,125

Number Name Date 668,919 Hill et a1. Feb. 26, 1901 Number 1,096,893 Ellis May 19, 1914 454,452

6 Name Date Baird et a1 Oct. 11, 1938 Slayten et a1 Nov. 1, 1938 Thomas Dec. 26, 1939 Juve Jan. 2'7, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain Oct. 1, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US668919 *Jul 5, 1900Feb 26, 1901William Gilbert Hill JrBlanket for printing-presses.
US1096896 *Sep 9, 1911May 19, 1914Frank E EllisPrinter's blanket.
US2133183 *Aug 22, 1933Oct 11, 1938Owens Illinois Glass CoElectrical insulation
US2135057 *Feb 7, 1936Nov 1, 1938Owens Illinois Glass CoFabric belting
US2184326 *Jul 22, 1936Dec 26, 1939Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpTire
US2271125 *Aug 3, 1940Jan 27, 1942Goodrich Co B FOffset printing blanket
GB454452A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2804417 *Jan 13, 1947Aug 27, 1957Minnesota Mining & MfgPrinting accessory
US2893320 *Mar 29, 1956Jul 7, 1959Fort Wayne Corrugated Paper CoPrinting of corrugated board
US2925355 *Apr 13, 1954Feb 16, 1960Edward D HillMethod of making an offset blanket
US3053718 *Jul 3, 1958Sep 11, 1962Kimberly Clark CoCompressed top press sheet
US3085507 *Aug 24, 1962Apr 16, 1963Kunetka Lawrence SRubber printing plate with built-in curvature
US3235772 *Aug 8, 1961Feb 15, 1966Gurin EmanuelAnti-static printer's blanket in combination with grounded metal roller
US3285799 *Sep 22, 1964Nov 15, 1966Minnesota Mining & MfgSmash-resistant offset printing blanket
US3418864 *Jan 31, 1964Dec 31, 1968Grace W R & CoPrinting blanket and method of making the same
US4015046 *Feb 23, 1976Mar 29, 1977Dayco CorporationPrinting blanket and method of making same
US4718818 *Sep 4, 1984Jan 12, 1988United Technologies CorporationContainment structure
US4934899 *Aug 8, 1988Jun 19, 1990United Technologies CorporationMethod for containing particles in a rotary machine
US5230124 *Apr 5, 1990Jul 27, 1993James Holdsworth & Brothers LimitedRoller with clothing retaining structure and card clothing
US5475898 *Mar 16, 1995Dec 19, 1995Holdsworth James & BrothersMethod of fixing card clothing to carrier cylinder
US20080217798 *Apr 19, 2007Sep 11, 2008Industrial Technology Research InstituteMold structure and the manufacturing method thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification442/260, 52/171.3, 428/909, 442/293, 492/48, 101/376
International ClassificationB28B5/02, B41N10/04
Cooperative ClassificationY10S428/909, B41N10/04, B28B5/023
European ClassificationB41N10/04, B28B5/02B2B