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Publication numberUS2490502 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 6, 1949
Filing dateJun 1, 1948
Priority dateMar 25, 1948
Publication numberUS 2490502 A, US 2490502A, US-A-2490502, US2490502 A, US2490502A
InventorsAudibert Marcel
Original AssigneeAudibert Marcel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Filter for air lines
US 2490502 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 6, 1949 M. AUDIBERT FLTER FOR AIR LINES 2 Sheets-Sheet .l

Filed June l, 1948 @tto/we s De@ 6, i949 M. AUDIBERT 2,490,502 v FILTER FOR AIR LINES Filed June l, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Dec. 6, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application June 1, 1948, Serial No. 30,267 In Canada March 25, 1948 2 Claims.

The present invention relates to an air filter.

More specifically, this invention concerns a lter adapted to be disposed in the air lines of, say, a Vehicle, for the purpose of removing oil fumes therefrom.

In some large motor vehicles, such as autobusses, Diesel-engined locomotives and the like, the internal combustion engines are placed in closed compartments not necessarily ventilated by the usual front radiators. Accordingly, air to feed the engine has to be drawn in through ducts or passages open at one end to the atmosphere vand communicating at the other end with said compartment. This air may vserve the dual purpose of cooling the engine and supplying its air of combustion, after which it is expelled through the usual exhaust pipe.

In such vehicles, compressed air is also vused extensively for operating accessory devices, such as brakes, door actuators and the like. This compressed air is supplied by a compressor which draws its inlet air from vany suitable source, preferably in the engine compartment. However, during operation, the heating of the compressor causes vaporizing of a portion of the lubricants present (especially in the compressor cylinder) which accordingly mix as oil fumes with the compressed air. If these fumes are now permitted to pass into the mechanisms controlled by air pressure (brakes, autobus doors, etc.), they will, in time, cause deterioration of some of the parts of these mechanisms.

The main object, then, of the present invention is to provide means for removing vapourized oil and the like from an air-line system.

Another important object is to prov-ide a filter adapted to be disposed in the air lines of a vehicle which will prevent oil fumes and the like from entering the air-brake system and associated mechanisms.

Still another object resides in the provision of afilter as set for-th above which may be easily inserted into existing air-line systems.

Yet another object resides in the arranging of the air-lines of a vehicle to take best advantage of a lter of the character described.

And still another object is to provide a lter f the character set forth which is simple in design and may be easily and relatively cheaply manufactured.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent, or be further pointed out, in the description to follow.

As an example, and for purposes of illustration only, a preferred embodiment of the inven- (Cl. 18S-109) tion 'is shown in the annexed drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 shows an elevation view, partly'in 'section of a filter constructed according to the invention;

Figure 2 shows a mid-sectional elevation view 'similar to Fig. '1; 1 T! Figlure 3 shows a section along the line 3-3 of Figure 4 sho-ws, in diagrammatic outline and partly in section, a preferred arrangement in side elevation of a portion of the air line system of a vehicle with the lter of Fig. 1 in place;

igure 5 shows, in plan, the system of Fig. 4, an

Figure 6 shows, in similar outline, a rear-ele'- vation View of the vehicle and its air lines.

Referring now to the drawings, wherein the 'same reference characters denote corresponding parts throughout, the filter F of the inventionis vseen to be enclosed in a tubular casing IB, generally disposed in an upright position, having a closed top II and bottom I2 at which latter is a drain cock I3.

The air inlet opening Is is located at the side of the casing near the top thereof, whilst the outlet I5 projects centrally from top II. As the air, together with the vapourized oil, enters the lter, pressure in the system forces it down the inside of casing I8. An apertured plate I'I dis'- posed transverse the lter below inlet I4 permits passage of the mixture, and the latter then descends the outer face of a hollow cone I8 supported vertically inside the casing. A pipe 2| having a closed bottom end 20 and apertured sides, is located centrally within the casing and leads to outlet I5.

As may be seen in Fig. 2, the purpose of cone I8 is to urge condensation of the heavier vapourized oil on the surface thereof and .to prevent oil fumes from reaching the apertured outlet pipe. Thus the hollow cone is truncated near its vertex and is soldered or otherwise fixed to plate I'I at this point. Here, also, the pipe 2!) passes through a central opening in the plate and the two may be rigidly connected. Below this support, the exterior face of the cone tapers outwardly towards the casing wall until terminating quite close to the latter at 23, near the bottom of the filter. The lighter, pure air is thus capable of passing around the lower edge 23 of the cone and of being driven upwardly through the apertures of the outlet pipe 20. Since, however, the latter is up inside the cone, the heavier oil vapour, already substantially condensed, will collect in liquid form at the bottom of the casing whence it may be tapped of! through cock I3.

It is clear that the filter of the invention as described above will fulfill the purpose of removing vapourized oil from the air passed therethrough. The way in which this result is best realized, and a preferred arrangement of vehicle air lines with such a filter, is shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6.

The vehicle illustrated is one of the autobus type, having an engine 25 at the rear thereof and typical large-diameter, air-intake pipes 26 leading to the engine. These pipes are located between the roof and ceiling of the.bus and are open to the front, the forward motion of the vehicle being adequate to urge large quantities of air into the engine air-feeding system.

The air to be filtered is that pumped from the compressor for the purposes of actuating the various auxiliary mechanisms in the vehicle. At

present, this air is pumped directly from the com.- pressor to an air-supplying reservoir, which latter has pipes leading to wherever the air may be required for use.

The present invention seeks to ensure adequate filtering of the air prior to such usage. To this end, the compressor 30 drives the air into a supply line 3l, and the latter effects a circuit adapted to cool the contents somewhat prior to entering the lter. typical cooling method, which will facilitate subsequent condensation of the oil fumes, is to pass line 3I centrally along one of the large pipes 26, to cross to the other intake pipe and return therealong, and then to lead to the inlet I4 of ff.

the filter F. The incoming impure air having a somewhat lower temperature than whilst at the compressor, the vapourized oil will be the more readily condensed. The filtered air may then be connected, by a line 32, from the outlet I5 to the reservoir 33 supplying the air-operated mechanisms.

Obviously, from the foregoing, the present invention fullls the objectives set forth above. Thus there is taught means for removing oil fumes from an air system, comprising a lter and a delivery line to said lter in which the impure air is cooled somewhat. The filter disclosed is simple in design and construction, and is easily coupled into any air delivery system. At the same time,

the device urges condensation and separation of the vapourized oil and passes on only the pure air. Finally, an arrangement is taught for the air delivery system of a vehicle in which the relatively inexpensive filter' of the invention operates to best advantage.

It will be therefore understood that I do not limit myself to the particular embodiment of my invention hereinbefore set forth, or to any particular air line system, since it is obvious that various changes may be made in the size, shape and arrangement of parts without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the subjoined claims.

Figs. 4 and 5 show that a Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. In a lter for separating vapourized oil from air, an upright casing, an inlet and an outlet located at the top of the casing, an apertured pipe disposed centrally in said casing communicating with the outlet, a hollow, truncated cone upright in the casing surrounding and extending below said pipe, the lower edge of said cone approaching but not touching the casing, an apertured plate transverse the casing near the top of said cone and said inlet communicating with the body of the casing above said plate; whereby the mixed air and oil vapours pass from the inlet through said plate and down the exterior face of the cone, the oil vapour condensing and falling to the bottom of the casing, and the air passing inside the cone up into said pipe and hence to the said outlet.

2. In an air system of a vehicle having an engine, air-intake ducts leading thereto, a compressor adapted to supply compressed air and a reservoir adapted to receive and store the compressed air, and in which system the air supplied by the compressor may be adulterated by vapourized oils, means for moving said vapourized oils from the compressed air prior to storing the latter in the reservoir, comprising: a line receiving the adulterated air from the compressor extending for a substantial distance centrally along said intake ducts for cooling purposes, an air filtering device connected between said line and said reservoir adapted to condense said vapours and separate same from the air, said air-filtering device comprising: an upright casing, an inlet and an outlet located at the top of the casing, an apertured pipe disposed centrally in said casing communicating with the outlet, a hollow truncated cone upright in the casing surrounding and extending below said pipe, the lower end of said cone approaching but not touching the casing, yan apertured plate transverse the casing near the top of said cone, and said inlet communicating with the body of the casing above said plate; whereby the mixed air and oil vapour pass from the inlet through said plate and down the exterior face of the cone, the oil vapour condensing and falling to the bottom of the casing, and the air passing inside the cone up into said pipe and hence to the said outlet.

MARCEL AUDIBERT.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1107485 *Sep 1, 1909Aug 18, 1914Sf Bowser & Co IncSeparator.
US1223101 *Jun 24, 1916Apr 17, 1917Frank PaczigaSteam-separator.
US1269134 *Nov 14, 1914Jun 11, 1918Francis M TownsendCrude-petroleum and natural-gas separator.
US2229498 *Apr 27, 1939Jan 21, 1941Westinghouse Air Brake CoCompressed air conditioning apparatus
US2316376 *Apr 28, 1941Apr 13, 1943Louis WeissChilling means for draft beverages
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3269097 *Jan 27, 1964Aug 30, 1966Aro CorpAirline filter
US4689969 *May 6, 1986Sep 1, 1987Wilkerson CorporationRefrigerated gas separation apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/391, 55/DIG.170
International ClassificationB60K11/08
Cooperative ClassificationB60K11/08, Y10S55/17
European ClassificationB60K11/08