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Publication numberUS2491013 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 13, 1949
Filing dateJul 7, 1947
Priority dateJul 7, 1947
Publication numberUS 2491013 A, US 2491013A, US-A-2491013, US2491013 A, US2491013A
InventorsCrawford Charles W, Noll Paul E
Original AssigneeCons Western Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas holder
US 2491013 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 13, 1949 P. E. Nou. ETAL GAS HOLDER Filed Jul;r 7, 1947 I jfa,

'INVENToR 401. /VoLL BYC/aezas W CMM-oleo Patented Dec. 13, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Gas nomma Paul E. Noll,

Los Angeles, C

Pasadena, and Charles W.

alii., anignors,

Crawford, by mesne assignments, to Consolidated Western Steel Corporation, Los Angeles, Calif.

, a corporation oi' Dela- Applicatlon July 7, 1947, Serial N0. 759,390 Claims. (Cl. 22o-3) ever, may be economically stored by the use of y high pressure gas holders retaining gas under pressures that may range, for example, from 200. to several thousand p. s. i. The erection of high pressure gas holders of a conventional design has been expensive due to the fact that heavy steel plates are required which must be welded or rivted together at the erection site.

Our invention contemplates the use ofy a number of interconnected large diameter pipes having their ends closed in order to serve as storage containers. These pipes may be easily carried by rail or truckto the desired location, and may be readily disposed within a framework by the use of simple hoisting cranes or derricks. The pipes may be factory fabricated in lengths such as to be easily transported by rail or truck, and these lengths have closures on one or both ends.

. Where large .capacity storage is desired, one or more lengths of pipe may be welded together at the erection site or otherwise secured to gain this increased capacity. Thus, storage tanks or gas holders embodying our invention may be easily erected with only a small fraction of the labor required for a plate type of holder of equivalent capacity. Due to the fact that the holder is formed of pipe manufactured in a shop equipped with special machinery, the total cost is much less than that for conventional type holders.

It is therefore an object of our invention to provide a high pressure gas holder employing a plurality of tanks made of large diameter pipe.

Another object of our invention is to provide a gas holder that may be easily and inexpensively erected.

Still another object of our invention is to provide a gas holder employing a plurality of tanks disposed upon suitable racks and interconnected so as to form in eiect in single storage chamber.

Other objects and advantages of our invention will be apparent in the following description and claims, considered together with the accompanying drawings forming an integral part of the specification. in which Fig. 1 is an elevation view, with portions broken away, of a presently preferred type gas holder embodying our invention;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view through the gas holder construction of Fig. 3; and

. provided at the factory of Fig. l as taken along the line II-II of that figure;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary elevation view showing the details of construction of the saddles that support the tubular tanks;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary side view of the saddle Fig. 5 is a fragmentary plan view taken. along the line V-V of Fig. 4. 4

Referring to the drawings, a suitable foundation for the entire gas holder may include concrete footlngs Il, each supporting a pairzof piers Il. Two racks l2 and i3 are secured one to each pair of piers so that each will be supported by a separate footing lil.. Each rack i2 and I3 has# vertical members I4 of any desired structural shape, such as H-columns or pairs of Achannels placed back-to-back. Secured at intervals along the vertical members i4 are horizontal cross members I6 which extend beyond the sides of the vertical members I4.

A plurality of tanks I l formed from pipe are disposed upon 'the racks I2 and I I in any desired arrangement or pattern, although it is desirable to space the tanks from each other to allow ample clearance around each tank for painting. Each tank may, if desired, be constructed from one or more commercial lengths of pipe, for example lengths Ila and |8b as shown in Fig. 1. 'Ihese tanks I8 have welded thereto saddles I9 adapted to rest on the horizontal cross members I6.' 'Ihe tanks I8 are suitably interconnected by means of fittings 2i, and as shown in Fig. l, each pipe has plug ttings 22 to allow drainage of any condensate therefrom and to allow for inspection of the tank interior. Each tank is provided with end heads 23 secured thereto in any suitable manner, for example as by welding. l

The tanks I8 may be any length desired, and for purposes of illustration we have shown in Fig. i two commercial lengths of pipe secured together. According pipe sections I8a and I 8b are of any commercial length suitable for transportation, for example or 60 feet, and are with end heads 23 Welded or otherwise securedrto the ends of tions. These lengths of pipe Ita and |8b are welded together in the ileld at the Welds I8c, as indicated. The bending stresses in the tanks will be a minimum when the distance between supports is substantially 2.8 times the distance that the tanks extend beyond the supports. Accordingly, as indicated in Fig. 1, the distance between the supports I2 and I3 may be 2.8a, whereas the projection of the pipes beyond their saddles may be indicated by the dimension a. It will be recognized, however, that this is a simple engineering consideration, and a spacing of the racks may be such as to obtain any desired balance of stress.

these sec- The tanks I8 will be subject to expansion and contraction due to thermal conditions as well as variations in the internal pressure, and accordingly provision must be made to accommodate this expansion and contraction. Thel saddles I9 of one of the racks I2 andl I3 may be rigidly secured to the horizontal cross bars I6 by means of bolts, thus firmly anchoring each tank to that support. The saddle for the other support, accordingly, must be freely slidable on the cross bars I6. For example, the saddles for the rack I2 `may be rigidly bolted thereto, whereas the saddles for the rack I3 may be movably mounted thereon, as illustrated in Figs. 3 through 5. Each saddle I9 accordingly may have a generally horizontal lower flange with slots 25, for bolts 26 by which the saddle is secured to the horizontal cross beams I6. The bolts 26 are not fully tightened, however, but merely act to prevent the saddles I9 from moving laterally on the cross beams I6. Therefore when the tanks I8 expand and contract, the saddles I9 of rack I3 move with the pipes inasmuch as they are welded thereto, and this movement is accommodated by the slots 25. In order to avoid undue stresses in the interconnecting fittings 2l, these fittings should be located adjacent the rack which hasy non-movable saddles, for example the rack I2.

While any pipe of suilicient strength may be utilized for the gas holder of our invention, we have found that a cold worked type of pipe is particularly satisfactory for this purpose. This preferred type of pipe may have any suitable diameter, and we have found that a diameter of 30 inches is satisfactory. This pipe may be constructed by formingsteel plate into a cylindrical shape and then welding the abutting edges together, preferably by automatic welding machines, to form a pipe. The wall thickness of the pipe may be selected according to the pressures to be used. This pipe thus formed will have been made with a diameter somewhat less than the finished diameter. It may then be expanded to the desired diameter by any suitable means, such as by introducing internal pressure or by passing the pipe over a mandrel. This circumferential stretching of about 11/% to 31/2% not only rounds and straightens the pipe, but cold works the steel and tests the weld. The cold working increases the yield strength of the steel, as for example, from 45,000 p. s. i. in the original plate to 52.000 p. s. i. after expansion. In the expansion operation the weld is automatically tested is desired, more than two pipe lengths may be welded together. The tanks I8, complete with end heads 23, inter-connecting fittings 2|, drain plugs 22. and saddles I8, may be h oisted by a crane or other mechanism into position on the racks I2 and I3. If desired, the relative elevation ofthe racks may be such that condensate will iiow towardthe end having end plugs 22, where it may be drained off.

While we have described our invention with respect to a specic embodiment thereof, we do not limit ourselves to this specific disclosure, as it to the yield strength of the steel plate, and` should there be any weakness, it will be discovered in this operation. Since the weld is thus known to be as strong as the yield strength of th metal, no factor for joint inefciency need be allowed, and for this reason the pipe may be used at a higher stress than would ordinarily be desirable.

To erect a gas holder embodying our invention, commercial lengths of pipe, for example 60 feet, may be transported by rail or truck to the desired site. The concrete footing and piers may be poured and the racks I2 and I3 may then be fastened to the piers II. These racks may be wholly or partially fabricated at the factory inasmuch as their total height need not exceed 30 feet, and accordingly they may be easily transported to the-site. If a tank length in excess of the -commercially transportable pipe lengths is desired, pipe sections may be welded together at the site as illustrated by the sections IIa and IIb welded together at Ilc. If still greater length is obvious that various modifications may be made therein without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention. For example, any type of pipe having sviiicient strength could be utilized, although we have found that the cold worked pipe described is especially well suited for this purpose. Also, the supporting racks may be of any desired structure, and may consist of a concrete rack or merely supporting piers. Further, any desired length of pipe may be used and any desired space between the supporting racks may be used. Also, any desired mode of interconnecting the pipes may be used, and if desired, a single sinuous pipe could be used, although this type of fabrication would be more expensive.

In view of the foregoing remarks and other various modifications that could be made, we do not limit ourselves in any way other than by the terms of the following claims.

We claim:

l. A gas storage container comprising: a pair of horizontally spaced upright structural supports; a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced cross beams 'mounted on said supports, the ends of each of said beams extending laterally beyond their respective adjacent supports; a second pair of horizontally spaced upright structural supports, said second-mentioned pair of supports being spaced from said first pair, and substantially parallel thereto; a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced cross beams mounted on said last-mentioned supports, the ends of each of said last-mentioned beams extending laterally beyond their respective adjacent supports; a plurality of horizontally disposed pipes having both their ends closed-resting on the extending ends of said cross beams and bridging the space between the supports; and connections providing communication between said pipes.

2. A gas storage container comprising: a pair of horizontally spaced upright structural supports;' a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced cross beams mounted on said supports, the ends of each of said beams extending laterally beyond their respective adjacent supports; a second pair of horizontally spaced upright structural supports, said second-mentioned pair of supports being spaced from said rst pair. and substantially parallel thereto; a plurality of horizontally disposedvertically spaced cross y beams mounted on said last-mentioned supports,

the ends of each of said last-mentioned beams extending laterally beyond their respective adjacent supports; a plurality of horizontally disposed pipes having both their ends closed resting on the extending ends of said cross beams and bridging the space between the supports; cradles interposed between said pipes and beams; and connections providing communication between said pipes. 4

3. A gas storage container comprising: a pair of horizontally spaced upright structural supports; a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced cross beams mounted on said supports, the ends of each of said beams extending laterally beyond their respective adjacent supports; a second pair of horizontally spaced upright structural supports, said second-mentioned pair of supports being spaced from said tlrst pair, and substantially parallel thereto; a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced cross beams mounted on said last-mentioned supports, the ends of each of said last-mentioned beams extending laterally beyond their respective adjacent supports; a plurality of horizontally disposed pipes having both their ends closed resting on the extending ends of said cross beams and bridging the space between the supports: cradles interposed between said pipes and beams, one cradle for each pipe being rigidly anchored to its cross beam, and the other cradle therefor being slidable on its beam to permit elongation of said pipe; and connections providing communication between said pipes.

4. A gas storage container comprising: a pair of horizontally spaced upright structural supports; a plurality of horizontally vdisposed vertically spaced cross beams mounted on said supports, the ends of each of said beams extending laterally beyond their respective adjacent supports; a second pair of horizontally spaced upright structural supports, said second-mentioned pair of supports being spaced from said rst pair, and substantially parallel thereto: a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced cross beams mounted on said last-mentioned supports, the ends of each of said last-mentioned beams extending laterally beyond their respective adjacent supports; a plurality of horizontally disposed pipes having both their ends closed resting on the extending ends of said cross beams and bridging the space between the supports; cradles interposed between said pipes and beams.

` one cradle for each pipe being rigidly anchored to its cross beam, and the other cradle therefor being slidable on its beam to permit elongation ports; a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced cross beams mounted on said supports, the ends of each of said beams extending laterally beyond their respective adjacent supports; a second pair of horizontally spaced upright structural supports, said second-mentionedl pair of supports being spaced from said rst pair, and substantially parallel thereto; a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced cross beams mounted on said last-mentioned supports, the ends of each of said last-mentioned beams extending laterally beyond their respective adjacent supports; a plurality of horizontally disposed pipes having both their ends closed resting on the extending ends of said cross beams and bridging the space between the supports; cradles welded to said pipes and interposed between said pipes and beams, one cradle for each pipe being rigidly anchored to its cross beam, and the other cradle therefor being slidable on its beam to permit elongation of said pipe; and connections vproviding communication between said pipes, said connections being located adjacent to 2 said rigidly anchored cradles.

PAUL E. NOLL. CHARLES W. CRAWFORD.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the ille of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Sandberg May 8. 1945

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2849027 *Dec 23, 1953Aug 26, 1958Tetyak John JPipe shoe
US4099617 *Feb 17, 1977Jul 11, 1978Seattle Box Co.Shipping bundle for numerous pipe lengths
US4846088 *Mar 23, 1988Jul 11, 1989Marine Gas Transport, Ltd.System for transporting compressed gas over water
US5333465 *Apr 30, 1992Aug 2, 1994Mcbride Terry RUnderground storage system for natural gas
US6014995 *Jul 31, 1998Jan 18, 2000Agnew; A. PatrickOnsite petrochemical storage and transport system
US6412508Jan 12, 2000Jul 2, 2002Resource LlcNatural gas pipe storage facility
US7080864Jan 31, 2003Jul 25, 2006Drilltec Patents & Technologies Company, Inc.Apparatus for shipping and storing elongated members
US8011865Apr 7, 2008Sep 6, 2011Standard Car Truck CompanyRailroad car coil restraint system
US8033768Oct 21, 2008Oct 11, 2011Standard Car Truck CompanyRailroad car coil restraint system
US8277155Jul 29, 2011Oct 2, 2012Standard Car Truck CompanyRailroad car coil restraint system
US8308409Sep 8, 2011Nov 13, 2012Standard Car Truck CompanyRailroad car coil restraint system
USRE30373 *Dec 1, 1978Aug 19, 1980Seattle Box CompanyShipping bundle for numerous pipe lengths
DE1245572B *Feb 12, 1960Jul 27, 1967Ziemann G M B H ALagerung eines liegenden Behaelters auf mindestens zwei Unterstuetzungen
WO2003089836A1 *Apr 9, 2003Oct 30, 2003Marion Erdelen-PepplerPressurised container for storing gaseous media under pressure
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/581
International ClassificationF17B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF17B1/00
European ClassificationF17B1/00