Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2491516 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 20, 1949
Filing dateJan 12, 1944
Priority dateJan 12, 1944
Publication numberUS 2491516 A, US 2491516A, US-A-2491516, US2491516 A, US2491516A
InventorsMisener Carroll C, Piggot Charles S
Original AssigneeMisener Carroll C, Piggot Charles S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and means to safely deactivate explosive bearing ordnance
US 2491516 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1949 c. s. PIGGOT ETAL METHOD AND MEANS TO SAFELY DEACTIVATE EXPLOSIVE BEARING ORDNANCE 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 12, 1944 y/ AT INVENTORS CHARLES S. P1660? 6. MISENER Dec. 20, 1949 c. s. PIGGOT ET AL 2,491,516

METHOD AND MEANS TO SAFELY DEACTIVATE EXPLOSIVE BEARING ORDNANCE Filed Jan. 12, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 cuAnLEs' s. $6601- BY menu a. 155mm- VENT Dec. 20, 1949 Q s PIGGOT ETAL 2,491,516

METHOD AND MEANS T0 SAFELY DEACTIVATE EXPLOSIVE BEARING ORDNANCE Filed Jan. 12, 1944 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 u ln INVENTORS amass s. P/eeor BY 0mm 0. MISE/VER Patented Dec. 20, 1949 METHOD AND MEANS 'ro SAFELY nmc'rr va'rn EXPLOSIVE BEARING onmvancn Charles S. Piggot and Carroll 0. Misener,

Was

Application January 12, 1944, Serial No. 517,992

Claims. (Cl. 86-45) (Granted under the act of March 3, 1883, as

amended April 30, 1928; 370 0. G. 757) This invention relates to an improved process of, and apparatus for, gaining access to the interior of casings containing high explosives, such as the casings of mines and other explosivebearing ordnance.

An important object of the invention is to enable the forming of openings of substantial size in such casings by means which are quickly and easily operable from a remote point in a manner virtually insuring the safety of disposal personnel.

Another object is to provide improved means involving the use of relatively light and simple apparatus which is easily portable, and which may be quickly set up and quickly operated, the arrangement being such that in order to set up the necessary apparatus, it is not necessory for personnel to remain in the presence of the explosive-bearing ordnance for more than a very few minutes, thus greatly reducing danger to personnel in the event the explosive-bearing ordnance happens to contain a time delay fuze.

Another object of the invention is to provide such apparatus constructed and arranged not only to enter the casing but to permit removal of the explosive contents of the casing in a rapid,

safe and efiective manner, and which furthermore permits performing such removal operation while all personnel still remains at a. distance, if desired.

A further object is to provide an improved tool for entering the casing of explosive-bearing ordnance, and for removing the explosive contents thereof, which tool is adapted to be projected by means of an explosive propellant, and to penetrate the casing to a predetermined degree, the tool being further provided with means whereby a solvent or other suitable means for removing or rendering the explosive harmless, may be introduced into the interior of the case, and which is furthermore so arranged that the explosive may, if desired, be liquified and caused to run from the casing through the tool itself.

Still another object is to provide such a tool which is usable in almost any position and under conditions such that only a portion of the easing of the explosive-bearing ordnance may be accessible.

An object related to that last stated is to provide such a tool which is adapted to form an opening in a lower portion of such a casing, whereby gravity may assist in the removal of the explosive contents.

In the drawing, showing preferred embodiments 2 characters designate similar parts throughout the several views:

Figure 1 is a partly diagrammatic side elevational view of a mortar and a tool projectable therefrom and constructed and adapted to be used in accordance with the present invention, fragmentarily showing a portion of a mine casing in connection with the de-arming of which the tool is to be used.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the same, showing the projectile after firing and indicating the position which it then occupies with respect to the mine casing.

Figure 3.15 a view partly in substantially diametric longitudinal section and partly a side elevation of a projectile tool constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Figures 4 and 5 are side elevational and rear end views respectively of a modified projectile nose adapted to be substituted for that shown in Figure 3.

Figures 6 and 7 are side elevational and front end views respectively of another modified projectile nose adapted to be substituted for that shown in Figure 3. 1

Figure 8 is a longitudinal sectional view of a cannon-type projecting means, fragmentarily showing the projectile tool in position for firing.

Figure 9 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a projectile tool of somewhat modified form.

Figure 10 is a front elevational view thereof.

Figure 11 is a plan view of a tool of another modified construction.

Figure 12 is a longitudinal sectional view taken substantially on the line l2-l2 of Figure 11 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 13 is a front end elevational view of the same.

Figure 14 is a longitudinal sectional view of the shank of the tool of this embodiment.

Figure l5 is a plan view, partly broken away. of a tool of another somewhat modified construction.

Figure 16 is a side elevational view thereof fragmentarily showing the shank.

' Referring now to the drawings, reference character I designates the barrel of the mortar, which is supported by trunnions 2 in the side plates 3, which form the carriage, plates 3 being split, as indicated at 4, adjacent the trunnions and provided with clamping cap screws 5. Loosening the cap screws permits pointing the gun, which may then be fixed in elevation by tightening the bolts. The mortar assembly is shown as bolted of our invention and wherein like reference as to a wooden base i. and a sandbag 9 may be used to assist in positioning the mortar during firing. A mine casing is frasmentarily represented at "I.

A preferred form of projectile is shown in Figure 3. It consists of a longitudinally tapered body portion l2, having a pair of longitudinal passages l3-l4 therein separated by a partition l5 and each having a lateral orifice or ports as l'|--l5 openingto the exterior near the forward end thereof. The nose of the projectile is formed as a threadedly attached and replaceable portion 20 shown in Figure 3 as of conventional ogival shape.

A flared frusto-conic abutment portion 22 to the rear of the tapering section I! limits pence,

tration of the projectile, and the nipples 23-44 extending through ports in the abutment portion provide communication with the rear ends of the a line substantially perpendicular to the plane of the casing, or to the plane of tangency, at the point of entry, the ogival nose 20 illustrated in Figure 3 is of appropriate shape. Where it is desired to penetrate a case on an inclined or non-radial line, as near the bottom of a mine case,

the chisel-shaped nose 20A illustrated in Figures 4 and 5 is preferable, and may readily be substituted.

Where it is desired to punch a section from the body of the case, a tool as 203, of the contour indicated in Figures 6 and 7, having a front face formed of two planar surfaces 33, 34, intersecting at an obtuse angle along a diametrical line, as indicated, functions effectively.

In the somewhat modified construction shown in Figure 8, a breech loaded gun IA is provided, chambered at 28A to receive a metallic blank cartridge. A screw type breech plug, 35, is employed carrying a simple radially slidable firing pin 31 having a cupped rear portion 38 forming a chamber for the gases generated by the firing squib 39 which, when fired, projects the pin 31 against the percussion cap of the cartridge (not shown) to fire the same. The firing squib may be retained by a simple screw plug 40 and electrical connections 42 are provided to permit firing the same from a distance. The tool, itself, the body of which is generally designated I2A, may be of similar construction to that first described, although the shank 25A may, of course, be solid rather than chambered.

In Figures 9 and 10 a somewhat modified tool is shown, designed to punch sections from a casing into which it is projected, and having a head or nose portion 45 the front face of which is generally similar to that of the embodiment shown in Figures 6 and 7. The head, however, is merely frictionally positioned upon the forwardly projecting boss 41 carried by the tool body I23. The tool is also provided with a flared abutment portion 223 adapted to limit the extent to which it penetrates the case. The head 45 is of greater diameter than the shank I23, and

easy removal of the shank, the head being left inside the penetrated case. The head is'thrown free of the body of the tool when the motion of the latter is arrested by the abutment section 223. This form of the invention will be recognized as most convenient for use in punching inspection holes.

It will be appreciated that it is often desirable to form an opening in the casing of such an explosive item of ordnance as near the bottom as possible, to enable as much of the explosive contents to run from the bottom of the casing under the influence of gravity as possible when it is subjected to a melting, washing or other removal operation.

It will be understood that the more inclined is the line of fire of the tool with respect to the casing, the greater the likelihood that the tool will glance from the casing rather than penetrating the same. It is of course desirable to form as large an opening as possible, under most conditions. Where a chisel-shaped tool, such as that illustrated in Figure 4 is employed. the casing tends to deflect the entering tool inwardly (toward a radial line if the case is curved) thus limiting the size of the opening formed.

It will be apparent that if such a chisel-shaped tool could be made to continue in a substantially straight line, rather than digging or swerving into the casing, a much larger opening could be formed by firing the tool very obliquely in a manner to strip a section from the case. The modified chisel-shaped tool illustrated in Figures 11 to 14, inclusive, is designed to function in the manner last indicated. It is provided with guiding means adapted to prevent the tool from digging or swerving into the casing as a result of the turning action of the inclined chisel surface. As

-best illustrated Figures 11 and 12, the body of this form ofthe tool comprises a pair of spaced forwardly projecting arms 50, between which is a shorter chisel body 52 which may be integral with the arms. A chisel blade 54 may be attached to the sloping forward face of the chisel body, as by means of screws 55, and cross bracing means may be provided for the guide arms 50, in the form of the transverse screw 55 and its surrounding spacer bushing 51. Hardened shear plates 59 may be carried by the lower surfaces of the guide arms 50 in the area subjected to the greatest wear due to the shearing action of the tool as the metal of the case is forced upwardly between the side arms 50 by the inclined top surface of the blade.

As indicated in Figures 15 and 16, the guide arms, as 50C, may be considerably longer than the guide arms 50 illustrated in Figures 11 and 12. This is advantageous in firing from a greater distance, or where the tool is to be used upon a casing of greater radius. Other portions of this tool will be seen to be similar to those of the last described embodiment, the guide arms 53C, however, being formed separately, and the chisel body 52C also being formed of a separate block. These three main sections are clamped together by heavy screws 55C, and the shank 250 is threaded into the rear end of the chisel block. In this embodiment also, the chisel block or the area thereof near its cutting edge may be hardened so that a separate blade is not required.

While it will be apparent that the preferred embodiments of our invention herein described are well calculated to fulfill the objects and advantages primarily stated, it will be apparent that thetherefore forms a hole large enough to permit inventionis susceptible to variation, modification and change within the spirit and scope of the subjoined claims.

The invention herein described may be manufactured and used by or for the Government of the United States of America for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor.

We claim:

1. A projectable tool for use in removing explosive from a casing, said tool comprising a body portion having a piercing nose adapted to penetrate such a casing, abutment means carried by said body portion for limiting the extent to which the tool penetrates the casing, portions carried by said body portion defining a pair of longitudinal passages, and also defining a pair of ports each communicatingwith the surface of the body portion in a forward area thereof and one connected to each of said passages, and portionsdefining a pair of additional ports one communicating with each of said passages and each communicating with the exterior of the body portion in an area on the other side of said abutment means from said forward portion.

2. In combination with a casing substantially filled with explosive material, means for forming an opening in the casing without detonating the material, comprising a projectable tool including a shank, explosive-actuable means adapted to react against the shank to project the tool, a chisel-shaped piercing head carried by the shank, and guide means appurtenant the chiselshaped head for controlling the path of the tool after it has impacted such a casing.

3. In combination with a casing substantially filled with explosive material, means for forming an opening in the casing without detonating the material, comprising a projectable tool including a shank, explosive-actuable means adapted to react against the shank to project the tool, a cutting head carried by the shank,,and guide means appurtenant said cutting head and projecting forwardly and to one side thereof to engage a casing against which the projectile is fired and to guide the cutting head in a desired path with respect to such casing.

4. In combination with a casing substantially filled with explosive material, means for forming an opening in the casing without detonating the material, comprising a projectable tool including a shank, explosive-actuable means adapted to react against the shank to project the tool, a. cutting head carried by the shank comprisinga chisel portion, and a pair of laterally spaced shearing portions appurtenant said chisel portions for assisting in separating the portion of the casing on the side of the area thereof entered by the chisel portion.

5. In combination with a casing substantially filled with explosive material, means for forming an opening in the casing without detonating the material, comprising a projectable tool including a shank, explosive-actuable means adapted to react against the shank to project the tool, a cutting head carried by the shank comprising a chisel section, and a pair of shearingportions arranged to cooperate with the sides of the chisel section to shear a strip conforming to the effective width of the chisel from a casing entered by the chisel when the tool is projected obliquely against the surface of such a casing.

6. In combination with means as set forth in claim 5, guide means projecting forwardly of said chisel portion substantially parallel to an axis corresponding to the line of fire and spaced laterally from the cutting edge of said chisel portion.

7. In combination with means as set forth in claim 5, guide means projecting forwardly of said chisel section substantially parallel to an axis corresponding to the line of fire and spaced laterally from the cutting edge of said chisel section, said shearing portions being carried by said guide portions.

8. The method of rendering harmless an encased item of explosive-bearing ordnance that comprises the steps of directing at said ordnance from a remote position the nose of an elongated projectile the body portion of which is provided with a longitudinal passage having longitudinally spaced ports communicating therewith, attaching a flexible conduit to a port communicating with said passage spaced rearwardly of said nose, propelling said projectile from said remote position to pierce the casing of said ordnance, stopping the penetration of said projectile at a location adjacent said port, and thereafter circulating an explosive reacting fluid through said conduit, said ports and said passage.

9. An apparatus for safely deactivating items of ordnance comprising an elongated tool adapted to be fired from a gun to penetrate said ordnance, said tool having a rearwardly positioned shank portion, an intermediate body portion and a forwardly positioned penetrating nose portion. said body portion having a longitudinal passage and a pair of substantially transversely directed and longitudinally spaced ports communieating with said passage, penetration impeding means on said body intermediate said ports, and means securing a flexible conduit to the port remote from said nose whereby a deactivating agent may be introduced into said ordnance through said conduit port and passage thereby precluding the necessity for exposing personnel to injury by the unexpected detonation of said ordnance.

10. An apparatus for safely deactivating items 'of ordnance, comprising an elongated tool having a forward piercing nose portion and a rearward- 1y directed shank portion and an intermediate body portion, said body portion having a longitudinal passage, forwardly and rearwardly positioned ports communicating with said passage, penetration impeding means on said body intermediate said ports, a flexible conduit secured to said rearwardly positioned port, and said shank portion secured to said body at the end opposite said nose, said shank being chambered to receive a projecting cartridge whereby said tool may be fired from a mortar with the flexible conduit attached for introducing an explosive reacting agent into said ordnance in a manner precluding exposure to injury of operating personnel.

CHARLES S. PIGGOT. CARROLL C. MISENER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS (@ther reierencwon fell 1w:

Number UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Dete Pierce Aug. 22, 1865 Ough July 29, 1879 Pell et a1. Aug. 7, 1900 Teinple Jan. 18, 1921 Miller Aug. 23, 1921 McGill Oct. 18, 1921 Berthelsen Dec. 18, 1921 Swanick May 6, 1924 Knight May 6, 1924, Knight May 6, 1924 Number 8 Name Date Knight May 6, 1924 Botts May 6, 1924 Allison Aug. 26, 1924 Bowers Sept. 30, 1924 Maxwell June 15, 1926 Walker Mar. 20, 1934 Schlumberger Sept. 29, 1936 Temple Feb. 6, 1940 Temple Sept. 3, 1940 Cox Aug. 8, 1944 Hopkins July 23, 1946 Hoskln June 29, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US19063 *Jan 5, 1858Himselfwarner
US22863 *Feb 8, 1859 Mobtisihtg-chisel
US48371 *Jun 27, 1865 Improvement in arrow projectiles for ordnance
US49548 *Aug 22, 1865 Improvement in bomb-lances for killing whales
US217899 *Mar 17, 1879Jul 29, 1879F OneImprovement in extension-chisels
US655577 *May 11, 1900Aug 7, 1900Isaac WheeldonGun attachment.
US1365870 *Dec 15, 1919Jan 18, 1921Robert TempleExplosively-actuated affixing device
US1388363 *May 17, 1920Aug 23, 1921John A MillerDevice for attaching shackles to submerged objects
US1393894 *Jul 5, 1916Oct 18, 1921Mcgill Daniel FSystem of raising sunken ships
US1399924 *Apr 19, 1920Dec 13, 1921Lassen Berthelsen AndersFabric-cutting device
US1492905 *Jun 14, 1923May 6, 1924Columbia Salvage CorpMethod and apparatus for unloading high-explosive shells
US1492922 *Mar 28, 1923May 6, 1924Columbia Salvage CorpMethod and apparatus for unloading high-explosive shells
US1492924 *Apr 17, 1923May 6, 1924Columbia Salvage CorpMethod and apparatus for unloading high-explosive shells
US1492925 *Jun 30, 1923May 6, 1924Columbia Salvage CorpMethod and apparatus for unloading high-explosive shells
US1492956 *Apr 2, 1923May 6, 1924Columbia Salvage CorpMethod and apparatus for unloading high-explosive shells
US1506354 *May 2, 1923Aug 26, 1924Columbia Salvage CorpShrapnel-salvaging apparatus and method
US1509927 *Mar 24, 1922Sep 30, 1924Bowers Robert HCan opener and paring knife
US1589194 *May 12, 1925Jun 15, 1926Maxwell George SMuzzle-loaded mortar
US1951638 *Jan 9, 1933Mar 20, 1934Walker Clinton LDeep well whipstock
US2055506 *Dec 13, 1935Sep 29, 1936Marcel SchlumbergerCore taking device
US2189439 *Apr 15, 1937Feb 6, 1940Temple Jr RobertUnderwater connector
US2213435 *Nov 29, 1937Sep 3, 1940Jr Robert TempleTool
US2355513 *Jun 20, 1942Aug 8, 1944Cox Nellie LouiseExplosively actuated apparatus for perforating submerged or other articles
US2404441 *Feb 7, 1942Jul 23, 1946Raymonde Briggs HopkinsMethod of rendering bombs inactive
US2444045 *Apr 8, 1944Jun 29, 1948Hoskin Cedric AMethod and apparatus for reclaiming explosives
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2745555 *Mar 3, 1952May 15, 1956Hewey George RMethod for cleaning cesspools
US2780961 *May 7, 1953Feb 12, 1957Dietsch Francis WDevices for moving objects such as aircraft canopies
US2873648 *May 7, 1953Feb 17, 1959Dietsch Francis WRemote control fluid pressure responsive actuator
US3109369 *May 31, 1944Nov 5, 1963Plumley Harold JDisposal of encased explosives
US4046055 *Jul 18, 1975Sep 6, 1977The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyApparatus for safely neutralizing explosive devices
US4058412 *Jan 8, 1976Nov 15, 1977Green Hills, Inc.Apparatus for opening and washing cans
US4106701 *Oct 26, 1976Aug 15, 1978Siefken Larry ODevice for puncturing a hole in a can and washing the inside thereof
US4727789 *Jun 24, 1986Mar 1, 1988T & E International, Inc.For an explodable device
US4817493 *Mar 4, 1988Apr 4, 1989Amp IncorporatedWear-indicating piercer pin for explosively-operated tools
US4895275 *Aug 30, 1988Jan 23, 1990Corpak, Inc.Dispensing spike for penetrable pre-filled shape retentive containers
US4905871 *Jan 25, 1988Mar 6, 1990Dutertre Donald FHandling device for agricultural chemicals and the like
US4957027 *Oct 2, 1989Sep 18, 1990The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyVersatile nonelectric dearmer
US5174828 *Jun 11, 1991Dec 29, 1992Reginald RothDevice for discharging and rinsing a container
US5353676 *Dec 27, 1993Oct 11, 1994The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyApparatus and method for remote disassembly of failed high explosive type mine
US5497813 *Nov 22, 1991Mar 12, 1996Dinnis; Reinfrid C.Apparatus for opening sealed containers
US6439127 *Aug 2, 1999Aug 27, 2002Sandia CorporationPenetrating projectile for bomb disablement
US6860052 *Sep 29, 2003Mar 1, 2005Zachary B. ConnerTeargas deploying assembly
US7066914Mar 16, 2005Jun 27, 2006Bird Products CorporationCatheter having a tip with an elongated collar
US7976518Jan 13, 2005Jul 12, 2011Corpak Medsystems, Inc.Tubing assembly and signal generator placement control device and method for use with catheter guidance systems
WO1990002093A1 *Aug 29, 1989Mar 8, 1990Corpak IncDispensing spike for penetrable pre-filled shape retentive containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/24, 134/167.00R, 222/82, 134/5, 86/49, 134/62, 89/1.14
International ClassificationF42B33/06, F42B33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42B33/06
European ClassificationF42B33/06