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Publication numberUS2491647 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 20, 1949
Filing dateNov 12, 1948
Priority dateNov 12, 1948
Publication numberUS 2491647 A, US 2491647A, US-A-2491647, US2491647 A, US2491647A
InventorsTheodore Colavita
Original AssigneeTheodore Colavita
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tracheal appliance
US 2491647 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 20, 1949 T. coLAvlTA TRACHEAL APPLIANCE 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed NOV. 12, 1948 ZZ 4 INVENTOR;

T/zeafore @alam/'M7 @uw m WITNESSES T. COLAVITA Dec. 20, 1949 TRACHEAL APPLIANCE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 12, 1948 S m m I W Patented Dec. 20, 1949 UNITED STATES@4 PATENT OFFICE 10 Claims.

tiorn These tubes are designed to fit into the trachea and extend outwardly through the front portion of the neck. One great disadvantage of the simple tracheal tube or cannula, as generally used, is that mucous discharges from the lungs 0r respiratory tract of the wearer may be ejected through the tube and actually propelled considerable distances and over a wide area, This occurs particularly in cases of a single cough, and in` cases of a series of coughs or a coughing spell the effect is correspondingly magnified. The wearer of the tube becomes apprehensive of unexpected coughs whenever he is out, and his friends become naturally aware of the problems o t sneezes, coughs or even Sharp exhalations of the wearer. This strained social condition does not lead to an easy, rich and normal life which is so important to man. Too often wearers of the old types of' tracheal tubes have gradually withdrawn from their friends and become recluses.

Therefore the main object of this invention is the provision of a tracheal appliance which will effectively control the mucous discharge from the respiratory tract through the tube and protect not only those others who are present, but also the clothes of the wearer of the tube, house furnishings and the like.

Another object is to provide a tracheal appliance which will intercept and collect mucus discharged from` the respiratory tract through the cannula in a manner that will require no attention from the wearer except to periodically remove the collected matter.

Another object of this invention is the provision of such a tracheal appliance which is simple in constructiom inexpensive to manufacture, and easy to clean.

Still other objects and advantages of this invention will appear from the following detailed description of the accompanying drawings wherein Fig. l is a perspective View of a man wearing aV tracheal appliance conveniently embodying my invention.

Fig. ,2 shows the device infront elevationl Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view in vertical section taken as indicated by the arrows III-III in Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 shows the device in top plan with a pori Fig. 8 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken as indicated by the arrows VIII-VIII in Fig. 3, and

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary view partly in elevation and partly in section of a lower portion of one of the aforesaid component parts.

With more detailed reference to these illustrations, I0 designates the tracheal tube or cannula which, in accordance with my invention, is sharply curved as at II in Fig. 3 adjacent its posterior end I2 for a reason later disclosed. The appliance is held in place on the wearer as shown in Fig. 1 by a neck tape I3 attached to the opposite ends` of an arcuate stop plate I4! which is xedly secured to the tube I0.

For the purpose of intercepting and collecting mucous discharges forcibly expelled from the respiratory tract incident to coughing, I have devised a trap or retainer which is comprehensively designated I5l in Figs 1-5, and which is pendently connected to the downwardly-directed posterior end I 2 of the tracheal tube l0 with capacity for ready removal in a manner as also later explained. As shown, the retainer I5 is made up of separable parts including an inner mucus intercepting or baille element I6, a catch cup I1 and an outer or shield element I8 which are separately illustrated in perspective in Figs. 6 and 7.

The inner or intercepting element I6 is fashioned from reticulate material, which may be of relatively ne wire mesh as conventionally indicated, tubularized to a relatively large diameter and flattened to elongate elliptic cross section, with a neck piece I9 fixed axially within the open top end thereof. As shown, the neck piece I9 is of small diameter to telescopically fit upwardly over the posterior end I2 of the tube I0 and provided at the top with an angular slot 20 for engaging, bayonet-lock fashion, a lateral stud 2| on said tube end. It is to be particularly noted that the slot 20 and the stud 2| are so allocated as to cause the intercepting element I6 to take a position at right angles to the plane of the l tube I 0 so that, when in place, it will extend crosswise of the chest of the wearer. The mesh of the intercepting element I6 is reinforced externally of its bottom end by a band 22 (Figs. 3, 5 and 9.) that ts snugly into the catch cup I1 whereof the cross section is configured to correspond to that of said baille element. The band 22 acts as a spacer to prevent direct contact of the mesh of the intercepting element I6 with the wall of the cup and possible spill, from the latter, of the collected mucus.

The shield element I8 is fashioned from perforated sheet material which is tubularized to a diameter greater than that of the baille element I6, and which is likewise ilattened to elliptic cross section so as to surround said baille element and to partly overlap the cup I1 with allowance of a comparatively Wide perimetrlc clearance interval for free passage of air for the wearer in breathing. Fixedly secured axially within the open top end of the shield element I8 is a ring 23 which, in turn, is of small diameter to nt down over the neck of the intercepting element I6. By cooperay tion of diametral notches 25 in the lower edge of the ring 23 with diametral stud projections 267011- the collar I9, the shielding elementI-.iS-positioned so as to lle in the same planewith the intercepting element I6 as shown in Figsili and 5.

The open bottom end of the shield element I8- Operation 1f Mucus carried along withA air expelled at Vhigh velocity incident tocoughingthrough the cannula or tracheal tube VIll isspattered upon Ythe target surface at I II within the sharply rounded portion of said tube. By the attendant impact, the mucus is spread in a thin lm'on the inner surfaces of the tube end I 2. The mucus thus momentarily restrained imposes no appreciable resistance to the high pressure V.f'airjstream which is allowed to continue unabated pastthemuoous film through 'the neck I9, andits force is soon ndissipatedin passing through'the interstices .of theintercepting element I6, the spacial interval between said element and the shield element I8, and thevperforationsin the latter to the atmosphere.

If the cough is' a single one, the mucus clinging to the inner surfaces of the tube end I2 and neck I9 will, under, gravity influence and by-norm'al mi' exhalation of the individual, nd its way to the screen surface of the intercepting element I6 and be therebyheld. In successive coughing, following masses of mucuswill slide down over the preceding masses vand onto'the'still unoccupied areas of the screen surface and remain there. At times of severe coughing, the masses of mucus which do not chance to strike the target surface at thebend Il of the tubelll are forced pastit and down through the intercepting element I6 into the cup I"I. Thus, Vif the mucus issuing-from the tube Ill isin the form 'of athinlm, its destination will be the surface of the intercepting element I6, but if it is expelled'as a thick mass at the tube en'd I2 it will end yup in the cup I1. It will therefore be senthat the element |16 does not* .function as a filter. or sieve, but rather as a retainerand guide, and .in cases of waterymilcus it operates to channel thefiiuid into the cup. The shield element I8 serves as a guard to prevent contact of the wetted screening of the intercepting element with the shirt front and the chest of ther wearer. When necessary through complete coverage of the bailie element'with the mucus, the retainerA I5 is bodily removed from thetra'cheal tube I0, disassembled, and'itsparts cleaned for replacement. f V l f 71 do not, of course, consider myself limited to the precise 'details Vof 'construction herein disclosed, since various modifications are possible within-'the scope ofthe appended claims. For example, if desired or foundI convenient, the cartridgemay' be shaped to conformwith the curvature of the wearers chest,`and the intercepting velement may be more cheaply constructed of perforated cardboard or mesh fabric, discarded after having once been used, and replaced by an entirely new one.

The device is an artificial larynx insofar as coughing, sneezing and other manner of ejecta from the lungs is concerned, devised to benet persons who have had a laryngectomy, its main object being to divert the high pressure air of a coughfor sneeze into the atmosphere and at the same time trap the mucus instantly, hygienically and automatically as already pointed out hereinbefore.

.A Having thus described my invention, I claim:

`1."'Awtracheal appliance comprising a tube for connection to the trachea, having a downwardly directedV posterior end; a mucous discharge intercepting element dependently attached to the aforesaid end of the tube; and a catch cup at the bottom of said intercepting element.

`2. A tracheal appliance according to claim 1, wherein the posterior end of the tube is turned through a sharp bend as and for the purpose described.

3. A tracheal appliance according to claim 1, further including a shield which extends, with intervening clearance, about the intercepting element.

,4. `In a tracheal appliance, a tracheal tube with a downwardly directed posterior end; and a mucous discharge retainer detachably connected pendently to said tube end, said retainer comprising a porous tubular mucuus intercepting element in' axial relation to the tube, a catch cup at the bottom of the intercepting element, and a perforated open ended shield element extending, with intervening clearance, about said intercepting element.

5. A tracheal appliance according to claim 4, wherein the intercepting element, the catch cup and the shield Yelement are all of flat elongate cross section and disposed at right angles to the axial plane of the tube.

6. A tracheal appliance according to claim 4,

wherein the intercepting element is provided at element.

y 7. A tracheal appliance according to claim 4, wherein the intercepting element is provided at the top with a neck and bayonet lock means for telescopic connection to the posterior end of the tracheal tube; and wherein the shield element has a ringat the top adapted to engage down over the neck ofthe rintercepting element.

8. A tracheal appliance according to claim 4, wherein the intercepting element is provided at the top with aneck for telescopic connection over the posterior end of the tracheal tube; wherein the neck has outwardly projecting diametral studs; and wherein the shield element is provided at the top with a ring adapted to engage downwardly over the neck of the intercepting element, said ring having diametral notches in its lower edge to engage the diametral studs on the neck of theintercepting element.

9.' A tracheal appliance according to claim 4, wherein-the intercepting element is provided at the top with a neck for telescopic connection to the posterior end of the tracheal tube; wherein the shield element has a ring at the top adapted to engage down over the neck of the intercepting element; wherein Ythe bottom end of the intercepting element extends down into the catch cup;

and further including means by which the catch cup is detachably secured to the bottom of the shield element to hold the parts assembled.

10. A tracheal appliance according to claim 4, wherein the intercepting element is provided at the top with a neck for telescopic connection to the posterior end of the tracheal tube; wherein the shield element has a ring at the top adapted to engage down over the neck or" the intercepting element; wherein the bottom end of the intercepting element extends down into the catch cup; wherein the catch cup is provided with lateral projections and wherein the lower portion of the shield element is adapted to be sprung over the REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,065,920 Crawe July 1, 1913 2,039,142 Brehm Apr. 28, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1065920 *Sep 9, 1912Jul 1, 1913Charles E CroweTracheal tube.
US2039142 *Dec 21, 1934Apr 28, 1936Brehm William FTracheotomy tube
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3330271 *Jul 30, 1964Jul 11, 1967Vincent C Hozier JrStoma button and filter
US3433227 *Oct 25, 1965Mar 18, 1969Edward L KettenbachSurgical drains
US3585997 *May 15, 1969Jun 22, 1971Ancerewicz Sigmund H JrTracheostomy device
US3603313 *Aug 11, 1969Sep 7, 1971Arblaster DennisThrowaway condensate collector
US3719188 *Oct 20, 1970Mar 6, 1973Fisher FCough filter
US4401118 *May 28, 1981Aug 30, 1983Elliot SimonsSwimming apparatus
US4463757 *May 3, 1982Aug 7, 1984Schmidt Edward JCovering device for tracheostomy stoma
US4489723 *Mar 26, 1984Dec 25, 1984Elliot SimonsSwimming apparatus
US4607635 *Sep 27, 1984Aug 26, 1986Heyden Eugene LApparatus for intubation
US4637389 *Apr 8, 1985Jan 20, 1987Heyden Eugene LTubular device for intubation
US4763645 *Aug 25, 1987Aug 16, 1988Kapp Michael JTracheal tube filter
US4802474 *Sep 4, 1987Feb 7, 1989Beevers Katherine KProtective cover for tracheotomy tube
US4909248 *Jan 9, 1989Mar 20, 1990Smiths Industries Public Limited CompanyTracheal tube fittings and assemblies
US5022394 *Jan 12, 1990Jun 11, 1991Homecare Of DearbornHeat and moisture exchanger device for tracheostomy patients
US5840091 *Jun 9, 1997Nov 24, 1998Steve CulpepperSmog and dust filter for a tracheostomy tube
US7278429 *Mar 8, 2006Oct 9, 2007Eidon, LlcSurface energy assisted fluid transport system
US20040177851 *Mar 12, 2004Sep 16, 2004Miguel AcostaOcclusion-proof tracheostomy tube
US20060150981 *Mar 8, 2006Jul 13, 2006Eidon, LlcSurface energy assisted fluid transport system
US20080035154 *Oct 8, 2007Feb 14, 2008Eidon, Llc.Surface energy assisted fluid transport system
US20120047617 *Aug 23, 2011Mar 1, 2012Marsilia DidiodatoTracheostomy bib
WO1993008860A1 *Oct 26, 1992May 13, 1993Robert BezicotArtificial nose for a tracheotomy patient
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/207.14, 604/327, 623/9
International ClassificationA61M16/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61M16/047
European ClassificationA61M16/04E6