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Publication numberUS2491900 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 20, 1949
Filing dateJun 17, 1944
Priority dateJun 17, 1944
Publication numberUS 2491900 A, US 2491900A, US-A-2491900, US2491900 A, US2491900A
InventorsMihalek Emery
Original AssigneeO D Jennings & Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin controlled mechanism
US 2491900 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 20, 1949 E. MIHALEK COIN CONTROLLED MECHANISM 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 17. 1944 1949 E. MIHALEK 2,491,900

COIN CONTROLLED MECHANISM Filed June 17, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 79 6 w zda Patented Dec. 20, 1949 COIN CONTROLLED MECHANISM Emery Mihalek, Chicago, Ill., assignor to 0. D.

Jennings & Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application June 17, 1944, Serial No. 540,778

4 Claims. (Cl. 194-10) This invention relates to coin controlled mechanisms and more particularly to mechanisms which may be operated by two or more coins of diflerent values.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide a coin controlled mechanism which is operated thru a single cycle by coins of diflerent values and which will return change when a coin of a higher value is employed.

Another object of the invention is to provide a coin controlled mechanism in which coins of the lower value are dispensed from a receptacle which receives such coins inserted in the mechanism when a coin of higher value is inserted in the mechanism to make change. I

Still another object or the invention is to provide coin controlled mechanism in which an insertion of a coin of higher value is prevented when no coins of lower value are available to make change.

A still further object of the invention is provide a coin controlled mechanism in which insertion of a coin of the lower value resets the mechanism so that a coin of higher value can thereafter be inserted.

The above and other objects and advantages of the invention will be more readily apparent from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a machine embodying the invention; and

Figure 2 is a diagrammatic view of the operating mechanism of the machine.

As illustrated in Figure 1, the invention is embodied in a dispensing machine including a cabinet l containing dispensing mechanism of any desired type for dispensing either of a plurality of different types of articles. The type of article to be dispensed may be selected by a selector switch II which selects one or the other of the dispensing mechanisms so that the selected article will be dispensed.

According to the present invention the machine may be operated by coins of difierent values as for example, by either a 5-cent piece or a iii-cent piece. For this purpose, two coin slots l2 and II are provided, the slot l2 being adapted to receive nickels and the slot [3 being adapted to receive dimes. when a nickel is inserted in the slot I! the machine will be operated to dispense one article and when a dime is inserted the machine will be operated to dispense one article and to return a nickel thru the coin return opening indicated at ll.

2 a As shown in Figure 2, nickels inserted in th slot I! pass thru a chute l5 into a spurious coin detector it. Any spurious coins inserted in the slot will be returned thru the coin return opening It by a coin return duct I! while good coins inserted in the chute IE will pass thru a chute l8. Dimes inserted in the slot 13 will similarly pass thrua chute I3 into a spurious coin detector 2|. Any spurious coins inserted in the slot l3 will be returned thru the duct ll while good coins will passthru the chute 22.

Nickels passing thru chute i3 are received in a spoked wheel 23 by which they are held in a position visible from the exterior of the machine during several cycles of operation. Dimes passing thru the chute 22 are received by a similar spoked wheel 24 connected to the wheel 23 thru gears 25 on the wheels, both of which mesh with an idler gear 23.

The gears 25 and the dispensing mechanism (not shown) are driven by an operating motor 21 which drives the dispensing mechanism and which is provided with an extended shaft indicated at 23. The shaft 23 carries a pair of cams 29 and 3| as well as an intermittent driving member 32. The driving member as shown, comprises a rear disc 33 carrying a pair of'diametrically spaced pins 33. A segmental disc 35 overlies the disc 33 and is formed with a portion of its circumference circular with diametrically opposite depressions 33 registering with the Pins 34.

The intermittent drive mechanism is completed by a disc 31 formed with a series of arcuate portions, shown as five in number, to interfit with the arcuate portions of the disc segment 35 and having a series of radial slots 38 between the adjacent arcuate portions. The disc 31 is connected to one of the gears 25 so that when it is operated both of the spoked wheels 23 and 24 will be turned to equal extent in the same direction.

The motor is adapted to be operated thru onehalf revolution per cycle as will be explained later. When the motor operates one or the other of the pins 34 enters one of the slots 33 to turn the disc 31 thru one-fifth revolution of the driving member 32. Upon completion of an operation the disc 31 will be held against further rotation by engagement of one of the arcuate portions of this disc with one of the arcuate ends of the disc member 35.

The motor is adapted to be supplied, with operating current from supply lines 33 and 4| which may be the usual household electric current supply circuit. One side of the motor is connected directly to the line 39 thru a wire 42 and the opposite side is connected to a wire 43. The wire 43 is connected to one side of each of a pair of contacts 44 and 45, the other side of which is connected thru a wire 46 to the supply line 4|. The contacts 44 and 45 are normally opened and are adapted to be closed by relays 41 and 48 operating armatures 49 and respectively when the coils 41 and 48 are energized.

The coil 41 is connected thru a wire 52 to one side of a pair of switch contacts 53 which are operated by a lever 54 projecting into the nickel coin chute l8 to be closed each time a nickel passes thru the coin chute. The other side of the pair of contacts 53 is connected thru a wire 55 to a contact 56 adapted to engage a contact 51 under the control of the cam 29. The contact 51 is connected as shown directly to the wire 46 which leads to the supply line 4|.

The armature 49 operated by the coil 41 also controls a pair of switch contacts 58 connected at one side to the wire 52 and at the other side to the contact 56 thru a wire 59. The side of the coil 41 opposite the wire 52 is connected directly to the supply line 39 thru a wire 6|.

When a nickel is inserted in a machine and passes thru coin chute l8 it temporarily closes the contacts 53. This initially establishes a circuit thru the coil 41 from the line 39 thru line 6|, coil 41, line 52, contacts 53, wire 55, contacts 56 and 51, and wire 46 to the supply line 4|. This energizes the coil 41 causing it to attract the armature 49 and closing the switches 44 and 58. The contacts 58 form a holding circuit from supply line 39 thru the wire 6|, coil 41, contacts 58, wire 59, switch blades 56 and 51 and wire-46 to supply line 4|. The coil 41 is therefore held energized as long as switch contacts 56 and 51 are in engagement.

As soon as the contacts 44 close the motor 21 is energized from supply line 39 thru wire 42, motor 21, wire 43, switch 44 and wire 46 to supply line 4|. The motor, therefore, begins to operate to drive the dispensing mechanism and to drive the shaft 28.

The cam 29 mounted on shaft 28 is formed with two raised lobes separated by two opposite depressed portions and the switch blade 51 is formed with an extension having a projection 62 thereon engageable with the raised lobes of the cam. The cam normally occupies the position shown in which the projection 62 is opposite a depressed portion of the cam so that the switch blade 51 can spring downwardly into engagement with the contact 56. After the motor has turned the shaft 28 thru a relatively small angle, one of the raised lobes of the cam 29 will engage the projection 62 to move the switch blade 51 out of engagement with the blade 56 and into engagement with a contact 63 connected to the wire 43. When this occurs the motor will be connected across the supply line thru wires 42, switch blades 63 and 51 and wires 43 and 46. However, since the circuit be con contacts 56 and 51 is interrupted, the coil 41 will be de-energized and the armature 49 will drop to the position shown allowing the switches 44 and 58 to open. The motor will continue to operate until the projection 62 moves off of the raised lobe of cam 29 at which time the blade 51 will drop to the position shown opening the motor circuit between the contacts 61 and 63. The position at which this occurs will always be the same so that the motor will always stop with the cams and the spoked'wheels 23 and 24 in the same positions. With a two-lobed cam as shown, it will be seen that each operating cycle of the mechanism requires half of a revolution of the shaft 28.

During rotation of the shaft 28 as above described, the intermittent drive member 32 will drive the spoke wheels 23 and 24 thru one-fifth of a revolution. The coin passing thru the chute l8 will be received in the space between the uppermost spokes of the wheel 23 and a coin previously received in the wheel will be discharged in the lower part thereof. A coin receptacle 64 is provided to receive coins from the wheel 23 and to hold them in a vertical stack as shown at 66. After the receptacle 64 is filled any additional coins will be carried bythe chute 66 to a container provided therefor.

Passage of a dime thru chute 22 operates a pair of switch blades 61 thru an operating lever 68 projecting into the chute temporarily to close the blades 61. One of the blades 61 is connected to the wire 55 and the other is connected thru a wire 69 to a switch contact 1|. The blade 1| is engageable with a switch blade 12 which is connected thru a wire 13 to the lower end of the coil 48. The upper end of coil 48 is connected thru a wire 14 to the supply line 39. The switch blade 1| is movable with a blade 15 which is connected to the wire 82. The blade 15 is adapted to engage a blade 11 connected thru a wire 18 to one side of a solenoid 19 the other side of which is connected directly thru a wire 8| to the supply line 39. The wire 69 is also connected thru a wire 82 to one side of a holding circuit switch 83 operated by the armature 5| the other side of which is connected to the wire 59.

When a dime is inserted in the machine, it temporarily closes the switch 61 establishing a circuit thru the coil 48, from the line 39, thru the wire 14, coil 48, line 13, wire 69, switch 61. wire 55, switch blades 56 and 51 and wire 46 to the supply line 4|. This energizes the coil 48 raising the armature 5| and closing the switches 45 and 83. The switch 83 establishes a holding circuit thru the coil 48 in parallel with the switch 61 from line 69 thru the wire 82, switch 83, to line 59 thru switch contacts 56 and 51 and wire 46 to the supply line 4|. Thus the coil 48 will remain energized as long as the contacts 83 are closed.

The motor 21 is energized by closing of the switch 45 from line 39 to wire 42, the motor, wire 43, switch 45, and wire 46 to supply line 4|. Operation of the motor is thus initiated to drive the dispensing mechanism and to turn the shaft 28 and the earns 29 and 3|. According to one feature of the invention, insertion of a dime operates the dispensing mechanism thru one cycle and returns a nickel in change. For this purpose, a slider 84 is provided formed with an opening to receive a nickel from the receptacle. The slider is connected to a core moved by the solenoid 19 so that the opening therein will be moved into register with the change chute 85 when the solenoid is energized. Thus each time the solenoid 19 is energized the slider 84 will remove a nickel from the bottom of the stack in the receptacle 64 and dispense it thru the change chute 85.

The solenoid 19 is connected to the line 39 thru the wire 8| and thru the wire 18 to the switch blade 11. The cam 3| is a double lobed cam similar to the cam 29 and is formed in its raised lobe portions with further raised projections 86. As

this cam is rotated one of the projections 86 will raise the switch blades 12 moving both blades 1| and 12 in a clockwise direction. The blade 1| .movesmade into contact with blade 11 when the projection 88 moves the blade 12. When this contact occurs a circuit will be completed thru ,the solenoid '|9 from line 8| thru the solenoid. wire 18, contacts 15 and 11, wire 82, contacts 83, contacts 56, 51 and wire 46 to the supply line 4|. Since the contacts 83 are closed only when a dime has been inserted in the machine, the solenoid 19 cannot be energized'upon closing of contacts 15 and I1 when the motor is operated by insertion of anickel.

As the shaft 28 continues to turn the switch blade 12 will drop oil of a lobe of the cam 3| to open the circuit between blades II and I2, This will break the holding circuit for the coil 48, deenergizing the coil and allowing the armature 5| to drop to the position shown in which contacts 45 and 83 are open. However, before this occurs the cam 29 will-have raised the blade 51 engaging it with the blade 63 and completing a circuit thru the motor'as described above in connection with nickel operation. Thus, the-motor will continue to run until the upper projection 62 drops oil a lobe of the cam 29 at which time the parts will be in the position shown with the blade 12 elevated by the cam 3| into engagement with the blade H.

In order to prevent insertion of a dime into the machine when no change is available in the receptacle 64, a feeler 81 is provided movable thru an opening in the side of the receptacle 54 to engage coins therein. The feeler is urged inwardly toward the receptacle by a spring 88 and is formed on its lower surface with a projection 88 controlling a switch 9 I. When the feeler moves into the receptacle in the absence of coins therein to the position shown in Figure 2, the switch 9| will be opened. One side of the switch 9| is connected thru the wire 8| to the supply line 39 and the other side is directly connected thru a wire 92 to a coil 93. The coil is connected thru a wire 94 to the supply line 4| so that it is energized whenever the switch 9| is closed.

The coil 93 controls'a blocking finger 95 which projects into the coin detector box 2|. The coil 93 is energized, holds the finger 95 out of the box 2| and when it is de-energized it allows the finger 95 to move into the box 2|. The finger 95 operates to divert any dimes inserted thru the chute |9 directly into the coin return chute ll. Thus when there is no change in the receptacle 64 any dimes inserted in the machine will be returned without passing thru the operating chute 22.

Each time a nickel is inserted in the machine thefeeler 81 is retracted so that it will again engage coins in the receptacle 64 and permit insertion of dimes. For this purpose a solenoid 98 is provided having its movable core 91 connected to a lever 98 which is connected at one end to the finger 81. When the solenoid 96 is energized the finger 81 will be moved to the right so that it can engage a nickel in the receptacle 64.

One side of the solenoid 95 is connected to the wire 8| and the other side is connected thru a wire 91 to the wire 52. When the switch 53 is closed by insertion of a nickel the solenoid 95 will be energized from wire 91, thru the switch 53, wire 55, contacts 56 and 51 and wire 46 to the supply line 4|. Engagement of the finger 81 with a coin in the receptacle 64 will permit the switch 5| to close to energize the coil 93 and move the blocking finger 95 out of the coin box 2| With the parts in this position dimes can be inserted and can pass thru the coin chute 22v to operate the mechanism as described above.

While one embodiment of the invention is shown and described in detail herein it is to be understood that this is illustrative only and is not intended as a definition of the scope of the invention, reference being had for this purpose to the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A coin controlled mechanism comprising a pair of coin chutes to receive coins of different values, means operated by a coin passing thru the chute for the coin of lower value to operate the mechanism thru one operating cycle, a receptacle to receive coins of'the lower value from the chute therefor, means operated by a coin passing thru the chute for the coin of higher value to operate the mechanism thru one operating cycle and simultaneously to dispense a coin of lower value from the receptacle, 9. feeler engageable with coins in the receptacle, resilient Y means urging the feeler toward the receptacle, means operated by movement of the feeler into the receptacle beyond its normal coin engaging position to prevent passage of a coin thru the chute for coins of the higher value when the receptacle is empty and means operated by a coin passing through the chute for the coin of lower value to retract the i'eeler from the receptacle.

-2. A coin-controlled mechanism comprising a pair of coin chutes to receive coins of diiierent values, an operating motor, switch means operated by passage of a" coin thru the chute for coins of lower value to energize the motor for operation thru one cycle of the mechanism, switch means controlled by passage of a coin thru the chute for coins of higher value to energize the motor for operation thru one cycle of the mechanism, a receptacle to receive coins of the lower valuefrom the chute' therefor, means controlled by the last named switch means upon each closure thereof to dispense a coin from the receptacle, a feeler movable toward and away from the receptacle to engage coins in the receptacle, means normally urging the feeler toward the receptacle, a switch operated by the feeler upon movement thereof toward the receptacle beyond its normal coin engaging position when the receptacle is empty, means controlled by the last named switch to prevent passage of a coin thru the chute for coins of higher value when the receptacle is empty, and means operated by passage of a coin thru the chute for coins of lower value to move the feeler away from the receptacle.

3. A coin controlled mechanism comprising a pair of coin chutes to receive coins of difierent values, an operating motor, cam controlled switches operated by the motor, circuits for the motor controlled by the switches to energize the motor during one cycle of operation of the mechanism, coin controlled switches operated by passage of a coin thru either of the chutes to initiate operation of the motor, a receptacle to receive coins from the chute for coins of lower value, a feeler engageable with coins in the receptacle, resilient means urging the feeler toward the receptacle to engage coins therein, means operated by passage of a coin thru the chute for coins of the higher value to dispense a coin from the receptacle, means operated by the feeler to prevent passage of a coin thru the chute for coins of higher value when the feeler fails to engage a coin in the receptacle and means operated by a coin passing through the chute for the coin of lower value to move the feeler away from the receptacle against the resilient means.

4. A coin controlled mechanism comprising a pair of coin chutes to receive coins of diflerent values, an operating motor, cam controlled switches operated by the motor, circuits for the motor controlled by the switches to energize the motor during one cycle of operation of the mechanism, coin controlled switches operated by passage of a coin thru either of the chutes to initiate operation of the motor, a receptacle to receive coins from the chute for coins of lower value, a feeler movable toward and away from the receptacle to engage coins in the receptacle, means normally urging the feeler toward the receptacle, means operated by passage 01' a coin thru the chute for coins of the higher value to dispense a coin from the receptacle, means operated by movement of the ieeler toward the receptacle beyond its normal coin engaging position, to prevent passage of a coin thru the chute tor coins of higher value when the feeler falls to engage a coin in the receptacle, and means operated by passage of a coin thru the chute for coins of the lower value to move the teeler away from the receptacle.

EMERY MIHALEK.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the tile of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,902,467 Robb Mar. 21, 1933 1,911,207 Robinson May 30, 1933 2,250,051 Patzer July 22, 1941 2,262,322 Harris Nov. 11, 1941 2,271,397 McDermott Jan. 27, 1942 2,323,255 Sutherland June 29, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1902467 *Apr 30, 1930Mar 21, 1933Robb Lewis JCombined vending and change making machine
US1911207 *Jul 14, 1928May 30, 1933Camco Scale CorpAutomatic vending machine
US2250051 *Feb 15, 1940Jul 22, 1941T Mfg Corp AbChange maker
US2262322 *Jan 17, 1939Nov 11, 1941A E DixonCoin changer and coin control device
US2271397 *Jul 29, 1941Jan 27, 1942Carl C BanksCoin-controlled change-making vending apparatus
US2323255 *Jul 26, 1940Jun 29, 1943George R SutherlandCoin controlled vending machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2564719 *Apr 15, 1947Aug 21, 1951Powell Melvin WCoin-actuated control and change delivery mechanism
US2655243 *Nov 1, 1947Oct 13, 1953Mills Ind IncCoin changer
US2664984 *Aug 20, 1947Jan 5, 1954Eierman Jack FChange dispensing mechanism
US2669335 *Jun 11, 1945Feb 16, 1954Raymond T MoloneyCoin control and change apparatus
US2669336 *Dec 12, 1947Feb 16, 1954Bell Aircraft CorpCoin controlled mechanism
US2671547 *Apr 9, 1949Mar 9, 1954Guardian Electric Mfg CoControl and change maker for vending machines
US2680444 *May 22, 1951Jun 8, 1954Grant Max LAntijaming means for multiple-coin fare collecting apparatus
US2685951 *Oct 22, 1948Aug 10, 1954Rogier Clarence FMultiple coin-operated vendor
US2699242 *Dec 3, 1949Jan 11, 1955Guardian Electric Mfg CoCoin mechanism
US2719622 *Jan 7, 1950Oct 4, 1955Johnson Fare Box CompanyCoin rejecting system for vending machine changers
US2754950 *Oct 9, 1948Jul 17, 1956Harris Charles FCheck controlled liquid dispenser
US2769517 *Apr 27, 1951Nov 6, 1956Hudson William LPeriodic coin collector
US2877776 *Oct 13, 1955Mar 17, 1959Hoke Jr Harry HCoin dispensers
US2922427 *Nov 14, 1955Jan 26, 1960Brandt Automatic Cashier CoCoin dispensing machine
US3140765 *Jul 6, 1960Jul 14, 1964Svenska Dataregister AbChange dispenser
US3176696 *Dec 14, 1961Apr 6, 1965Stevens Carlile RCoin vending apparatus
US3939952 *Oct 30, 1974Feb 24, 1976Umc Industries, Inc.Control for a vendor including card retention means
US5429222 *Feb 4, 1994Jul 4, 1995Schlumberger IndustriesDevice for verifying the conformity of and for routing objects inserted in a dispenser
US7270225Jun 19, 2006Sep 18, 2007Kil Jae ChangDual coin actuation mechanism with angularly and axially offset coin slots and recesses
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/351, 453/41
International ClassificationG07F5/18
Cooperative ClassificationG07F11/002, G07F5/18
European ClassificationG07F11/00B, G07F5/18