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Publication numberUS2492966 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1950
Filing dateJan 4, 1947
Priority dateJan 4, 1947
Publication numberUS 2492966 A, US 2492966A, US-A-2492966, US2492966 A, US2492966A
InventorsJohn L Ckola
Original AssigneeJohn L Ckola
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary toothbrush
US 2492966 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 3, 1950 J. L. cKQLA y 2,492,966-

` vROTARY TooTHBRUsH Filed Jan. 4, 1947 Patented Jan. 3, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ROTARY TOOTHBRUSH John L. Ckola, Minneapolis, Minn.

Application January 4, 1947, Serial No. 720,246

12 Claims. (Cl. 253-3) My invention relates broadly to fluid motors and more specifically to fluid-operated rotary tooth brushes and the like.

An important object of my invention is the provisio-n of a structure which is simple, inexpensive to build, durable in use, and easy to operate.

Another object of my invention is the provision of novel means for reversing the direction of rotation of the tool-equipped rotary spindle operated by the fluid motor.

Another important object of my invention is the provision of novel means for by-passing fluid to the rotary brush or tool when desired so that the tool `may be used either without the fluid or in conjunction with the fluid.

The above and numerous other objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent from the following detailed specification, appended claims, and attached drawings.

Referring to the drawings wherein like characters indicate like parts throughout the several views:

Fig. 1 is a vertical axial section of my novel device;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional View corresponding to Fig. 1, but showing a different arrangement of some of the parts;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged transverse sectional View taken on the line 3--3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged sectional view taken the line 4 4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged sectional View taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. l; l

Fig. 6 is an enlarged sectional view taken the line 6 6 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line 'I-'I of Fig. 1;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line 8 8 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged sectional view taken the line 9-9 of Fig. l; and

Fig. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on the line Ill-I0 of Fig. 5.

Referring with greater particularity to the drawings, the numeral I indicates an elongated casing, preferably cylindrical, containing a cylindrical bore in which is mounted for limited rotation a stato-r 2. Stator 2 is provided at its opposite ends with bearing acting valve elements 3 and 4, both of which are secured fast thereto. It will be observed that the valve element 3 is preferably, and as shown, conical in form while the valve element 4 is in the nature of a bearing sleeve which projects out one end of casing I,

which casing is restricted by means of an annular end-forming ring 5. Member 5 may either be formed integrally with the casing I, screw threaded thereto, or otherwise made fast therewith. Bearing-like valve elements 3 and 4 retain the intermediate portion of stator 2 in spaced relation to the cylindrical bore of casing I to provide therebetween an annular uid passage 6. Valve elements 3 and 4, together with the stator 2, provide a chamber in which is mounted a rotor l. As shown, one end of the rotor 'I is provided with a stub shaft 8 while a drive shaft 9 projects axially from the opposite end. As

, shown, shafts 8 and 9 may be integrally formed.

In any event, drive shaft 9 extends axially outwardly from the casing I through bearing sleeve 4. The interior'wall of the stator 2 preferably, and as shown, is provided with one or more spiral vanes I0, whereas the rotor I is provided with one or more spiral vanes I I which are pitched in a direction opposite to the pitch of the spiral vanes Ill of the stator, the purpose of which will hereinafter be disclosed.

Connected axially to the end of the casing I, opposite the drive shaft 9, is a fluid inlet passage I2 formed by a short tube I3. Concentric with the tube I3 and surrounding same is an annular fluid discharge passage I4. Fluid inlet and outlet passages I2 and I4 are connected to a suitable fluid source and drain, respectively (not shown), by means of concentric inlet and discharge tubes I5 and I6 respectively. It will be noted that the outlet tube I6 is secured to a ring Il which is threaded into the end of the casing vI and is integrally formed with the tube I3 'by means 'of radial partitions in the form of a spider I8. (See particularly Fig. 3.) A plurality (four in number) of fluid passages I9, preferably, and as shown, extend longitudinally from the uid outlet passage I4 to the interior of the casing I; and a plurality (four) of relatively short iiuid passages 2l) extend from the inlet passage I2 to the interior of the` casing I. It will be noted, particularly by reference to Fig. 4, that the interior ends of the passages I9 and 20 are not only equi-distant from the center of the casing I and valve element 3, but are also equally circumferentially spaced in the casing I, in alternative arrangement. A plurality (four) of fluid passages 2| in valveelement 3 communicate with one end of the stator 2 and are so positioned so as to be aligned with any of the passages I9 or 20 upon rotation of the stator 2 within the casing I. Similarly, a plurality (four) of fluid passages 22 inthe valve element 3 communicate with the annular passage 6 and are adapted to be aligned with the fluid passages I9 and 29 upon rotation of the stator within the casing. When the fluid passages 2i in the valve element 3 are in alignment with the passages I9 in the casing I, it will be seen that the passages 22 in the valve element 3 communicate with the passages 29 of the casing i; and similarly, when the passages 2| in the valve element 3 are in alignment with the passages 29y of the casingv I, the passages 22 in the valve element 3 will communicate with the passages i9 in the casing I.

The interior of the casing I is provided with a circumferentially extended segmental slot 23 (see particularly Figs. and 10) whereas the peripheral surface of the stator 2 is provided with a longitudinally extended V-shaped slot 24. Securely anchored in the center of the V-shaped slot 24 and projecting radially therefrom into slot 23, is a resilient stop linger 25 in the form of a leaf spring. The opposite ends of the slot 23 deiine stop shoulders 26 and 21, whereas the opposite sides of the V-shaped slot 24 are indicated by the numerals 28 and 29. It will be n oted that the relationship of the segmental slot 23 and the stop finger 25 is such that when the stator 2 is rotated with respect tol the casing I to a point where the stop finger '25 rests lightly against the shoulder 21, then and in that event, the passages 2l of the valve element 3 will be aligned with the passages 20 of the casing I, and the passages V22 of the valve element 3 will be aligned with the passages I9 of the casing. With the valve inthis position, fluid under pressure will pass through the inlet passage I2, the pas= f sages A2l] and 24 and from thence through the rotor chamber, lout of the opposite end of the rotor chamber., through a radial passage 30 .in the -staton 1into and through the annular passage 6, and out through .aligned passages 22 and I9 to the outlet I4, from whence it will be discharged. Similarly, when the stator 2 is turned with respect to the casing I so that the resilient stop finger rests lightly against the 'shoulder 26, the

passages 22 of the valve element -3 are aligned A with the passages 20 of the casing, and pas sages 24 of the valve element 3 are aligned with passages I9 of the casingl With the passages thus aligned, -huid under -pressure will flow inwardly through the inlet passage I2 through aligned passages 26 and 22 into and through the annular passage -6 through the radial passages 30 Yinte and through the rotor chamber 'and out through aligned passages 2| fand I9 into the fluid clischarge ,passage I4. It will 'be noted that with the valve 3 positioned as in Fig. 1, iiuid under pres'- sure flows downwardly through 'the 'htor chamber causing the rotor 1 to rotate clockwise with re'- spect t'o Fig. 6. With the valve positioned as in Fig. 2, fluid under pressure will flow upwardly through the r'otor Vchamber and cause th'e rotor 1 to revolve in a clockwise ydirection with respect to Fig. 6.

It is important to hote that as fluid passes through the rotorcontaining stator chamber, it is deflected radially inwardly by the spiral vanes I 0 of the stator and thereby caused to impinge with greater force upon the spiral varies 'II of the rotor. This action ycontinues from one end of the stator chamber to the other and the speed of tooth brush, I provide a removable stem portion 3| which is provided with an axial recess which frictionally engages the outwardly projecting end of bearing sleeve 4. A key 32 prevents rotation of the stem 3| on the bearing sleeve 4. As here shown, drive shaft 9 terminates within the bearing sleeve 4 and is provided with an irregularly tapered end. An extension shaft 33 within the removable stem 3I is provided at its inner end with a tapered end 34 that matches the end of the drive shaft 9. Drive shaft 9 is supported by suitable bearings 35 and 36 whereas the extension shaft 33 is supported by a suitable bearing in the stem 31 adjacent the outer end thereof and by the bearing 36 in the outer end of bearing sleeve 4. At its outer end, the extension shaft 33 is recessed to receive the stem 38 of a rotary tooth brush 39.

The brush 39 is partially contained within a segmental hood 46 which is removably secured to the end of a stem 3| by means of a resilient locking collar 4I and a detent 42. (See Figs. l and 8.) A radial slot 43 in the casing element 5 extends from the annular passage 6 and terminates adjacent the sleeve 4 and is adapted upon rotation of the sleeve 4 to communicate with two spaced radially extending passages 44 and 45, which in turn extend from the periphery of the sleeve 4 to an axial passage 46 surrounding the drive shaft 9. Passage 46 extends outwardly to the bearing element 36 on the end of sleeve 4 where it communicates with an axial passage 41 by means of the slot 48 in the bearing 36. Said passage 46 is open to atmosphere adjacent the brush 39 through a radial slot 49 in the bearing 31.

It will be noted that when the stator 2 is rotated with respect to the casing I so as to position the resilient stop finger 25 against the ends 26 or 21 that the passages 44 and 45 are circumferentially offset from the radial slot 43 so that no fluid passes Ithrough the passages 44 or 45. When it is desired to pass fluid through the passages 4'4 and and from thence through the passages of the sleeve 4 and stem 38 to the brush 39, the Ycasing I is rotated with respect 'to the stator so as to cause the resiient stop finger 25 to yield to a point where it engages lone of the sides 28 or 29 of V-'shaped slot 24 at which point the corresponding radial passages in the sleeve 4 will become `aligned with the radial slot 43. However, it will be noted that when either vof the radial passages 4'4 or 45 are aligned with the radial slot 43, the passages in the valve lelement 3 are in at least partial alignment with the passages I9 and 20 in the casing, so that fluid is passi-ng through the stator 'chamber under pressure to cause rotation of the rotor in the desired direction.

My/device is so constructed 'that it may be `held and the stem 3I manipulated to 'allow water Aor other iiuid to pass outwardly therethrough with the use of but one of the Ioperators hands. Manipulation of the .stein 3| may be as readily accomplished t'e change the `direction of rotation of the brush 39.

lDental authorities vare uniformly ofthe opinion that teeth should be brushed in a directionaway from the gums and in the direction of the teeth. 'This :function is readily 'accomplished by device, vsimply, by changing direction 'of rotation 'of the brush 39. ;It'isnot necessary toirern'ov'e the brush 'from 'the mouth when rinsing the brush an'd the teethas 'this is y'accomplished by merely aligning Ath'e slot '43 'with either :fof

- the radial passages or il'toallow water under pressure to pass downwardly through the stem 3| and unto the brush 39.

In use, but one fluid motor is needed for a entire household. It is but necessary to supply each member of a household with a stem 3| and its associated parts 39 and 40 as a unit. Thus, each member of a family is provided with a personal motordriven tooth brush and sanitary conditions associated therewith are accomplished at a high standard.

While I have shown a commercial form of my device in accordance with section 4888 of the United States Statutes, it will be readily understood that my device is capable of modification without departure from the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

f 1. A fluid motor including a casing, a stator coaxially mounted in said casing for limited rotary movements in respect thereto, a rotor coaxially journalled in said stator, a drive shaft secured to said rotor and projecting axially from one end of said casing, fluid inlet and outlet passages on the opposite end of said casing, valve elements at opposite ends of said stator, said stator and said valve elements defining a chamber in which the rotor revolves, a passage in one of said valve elements communicating with one end of said chamber and with the fluid inlet passage in the casing upon rotary movement of the stator :j

to its limit in one direction and communicating with the same .end of the chamber and the fluid outlet passage in the casing upon rotary movement of the stator to its limit in the opposite direction, and a second passage in said valve 1 element communicating with the opposite end of said chamber and the fiuid outlet passage in said casing upon rotary movement of the stator to its limit in one direction and communicating with said opposite end of the chamber and the uid inlet passage in the casing upon rotary movement of the stator to its limit in the opposite direction.

2. The structure defined in claim 1 in which the stator is provided with a spiral vane and the rotor is provided with a peripheral spiral vane pitched in a direction opposite to the pitch of the spiral vane of the stator.

3. The structure defined in claim 1 in which said inlet and outlet passages in the casing are concentric one to the other.

4. The structure defined in claim 1 in which the rotation of said stator is limited Within the casing by means comprising circumferentially spaced stop shoulders in one thereof and a yielding stop member in the other thereof working between said stop shoulders.

5. In a device of the class described, an elongated open-ended casing having a cylindrical bore, concentric fluid inlet and outlet passages connected to one end of said casing, a stator within said casing bore, bearing means on opposite ends of said stator mounting said stator for limited rotary movement with respect to said casing and spacing the intermediate portion thereof from the wall of said casing bore to provide an annular fluid passage, said bearing means and stator providing a rotor chamber, a rotor mounted in said chamber and having a drive shaft projecting axially through the end of the casing opposite the fluid inlet, a passage in the bearing means adjacent the fluid inlet communicating with one end of said chamber and the fluid inlet upon rotary movement of the stator to its limit in one direction and communicating with the same end of the chamber and the fluid outlet upon rotary movement of the stator to its limit in the opposite direction, and a second'passage in said bearing means communicating through said annular passage with the opposite end of the chamber and the fiuid outlet in the casing upon rotary movement of the stator to its limit in one direction and communicating through said annular passage with said opposite end of the chamber and the fluid inlet passage in the casing upon rotary movement of the stator to its limit in the opposite direction, the stator bearing means in the end of the casing opposite the fluid inlet being in the nature of a sleeve which projects outwardly through the casing to provide means for rotating the stator in respect to the casing, said drive shaft being journalled in and projecting outwardly from said sleeve.

6. The structure defined in claim 5 in which the inside wall of the stator is .provided with a continuous spiral vane extending from one end thereof to the other end thereof, said rotor being provided with a continuous peripheral spiral vane which is pitched opposite to the direction of the pitch of the spiral vane of the stator.

7. The structure defined in claim 5 in which the rotary movements of the stator within said casing are limited by means including a circumferentially extended slot in one thereof and a yielding stop nger in the other thereof.

8. The structure defined in claim 5 in further combination with a fluid outlet passage in said bearing sleeve adjacent said drive shaft, and a radial passage in said bearing sleeve adapted to communicate with said annular passage and said last-named fluid outlet passage only when the stator is rotated Within the casing to an extent to cause a yielding of the stop finger.

9. In a device of the class described, an elongated open-ended casing having a cylindrical bore, fluid inlet and outlet passages connected to one end of said casing, a stator within said casing bore, bearing-like valve elements on opposite ends of said stator mounting said stator for limited rotary movement with respect to said casing and spacing the intermediate portion thereof from the wall of the casing bore to provide an annular fluid passage, a circumferentially extended slot in the bore of said casing, an axially extended V-shaped notch in the peripheral surface of said stator, a resilient stop finger projecting radially from said stator centrally of said V-shaped notch and adapted to engage the ends of the slot in the casing, said valve elements and said stator defining a rotor chamber, a rotor mounted in said chamber and having a drive shaft projecting axially through the end of the casing opposite the uid inlet, a passage for admitting fiuid under pressure through one end of the chamber, a passage from the other end of said chamber for the discharge of said fluid, the valve elements in the end of the casing opposite the uid inlet being in the nature of a bearing sleeve which projects outwardly through the casing to provide means for rotating the stator with respect to the casing, said drive shaft being journalled in said sleeve, a fiuid outlet passage in said sleeve parallel to said drive shaft, and a pair of radial fluid passages in said sleeve extending from said outlet passage and adapted to communicate with the annular passage intermediate the casing and stator upon extreme movements of said resilient amanece 7 stop finger. in the circumferentially .extended is1ot in the casing.

. 10. The structure defined in claim 9 in further :combination with a removable stem secured to .said sleeve axially of saidcasing, an extension shaft journalled in said stem for operative vengagement with said `drive shaft, and a tool mounted on the end of vsaid extension shaft for rrotation therewith.

11. A uid motor including a casing; a stator -coaxially mounted in said casing for klimited frotary `nfiovementsgin respect thereto, a -.rotor coaxially journalledin said-stator, a drive shaft secured to said rotor Vand projecting axially from :one Vendv of said casing, fluid inletv and outlet passages on'the opposite end of said casing, valve elements at opposite ends Vofsaidv stator, said stator and said valveelements defining a-chamber -in- -Which the `rotor revolves, a. passage in one .0f-said valve elements communicating with one ,end of said ,chamber and the uid inlet passage upon rotary movement of the stator to its limit in one direction and communicating im'ththe same rend of the chamber andthe fluid outlet ypassage uponv rotary movement of the stator to its limit in the opposite direction, a secondA passage -in saidI valve .element vcommunicating with the opposite endofsaid chamber and the'uid outlet in said casingpassageupon rotary movement of the stator to its limit in one direction and communicating with said opposite end of the chamber. andl thefiiuid inlet vpassage in the casing passage upon rotary movement `Ofthe stator to its lim'it inY :the opposite direction, the valve element adjacent thedrive shaftend of the casing being in thenature of an axiallgr ex- 8 tended bearing sleeve `which projects through the end of the casing to provide means' forrotating' the 4stator with respect to the casing, said drive shaft being journalled within said bearing lsleeve, a removable stem secured to said :bearing sleeve for rotation therewith, an extension shaft yjournalled'i'n said stem for cooperation with said drive-shaft, and a tool mounted on the exteme `end of said extension shaft for rotation therewith.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 912,061 Beckman Feb. 9, 1909 1,212,967 Light et al Jan; 16,1917 1,971,283 Stimson Aug. 21,v 1934 2,283,314 Ckola May 19, 1942 2,406,959 Millard Sept. 3, A1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 553,757 France May 30, 1923

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US912061 *Jun 18, 1908Feb 9, 1909August H BeckmanSteam-turbine.
US1212967 *Sep 16, 1916Jan 16, 1917Samuel LightSelf-moistening and self-soaping brush.
US1971283 *Mar 31, 1933Aug 21, 1934Stimson Harry WPower driven rotary toothbrush
US2283314 *Aug 1, 1940May 19, 1942Ckola John LHydrodental brush
US2406959 *Aug 21, 1944Sep 3, 1946Millard Dwight HRotary pump
FR553757A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2808225 *Oct 6, 1954Oct 1, 1957Nu Jett Products CorpCompressed air motor
US2825493 *Feb 11, 1953Mar 4, 1958Bernard BercovitzCompressed air-driven turbines
US2867214 *Feb 14, 1956Jan 6, 1959Ralph Luikart IiSkin treating apparatus
US3046585 *Jun 20, 1960Jul 31, 1962Gordon R LedinghamReversible turbine driven oral hygiene apparatus
US3084439 *Jan 28, 1959Apr 9, 1963Martin StauntAir driven dental handpieces
US3214775 *May 24, 1963Nov 2, 1965Murov Isaac IFluid-powered toothbrush
US3231237 *Oct 22, 1962Jan 25, 1966Atlas Copco AbReversible pressure fluid driven motor
US3303812 *Apr 13, 1965Feb 14, 1967Charles Sierra JosephUnderwater mechanical brush
US3349490 *Feb 20, 1964Oct 31, 1967Star Dental Mfg CoStraight handpiece
US3502158 *Jun 18, 1968Mar 24, 1970Dotco IncAir operated tool with rear exhaust
US3760447 *Sep 15, 1971Sep 25, 1973Vivion LFluid driven rotary hand tool
US4141671 *Apr 20, 1977Feb 27, 1979Tarsoly Balazs KTool gas turbine motor
DE1291439B *Mar 29, 1962Mar 27, 1969Winkler AlexanderGeraet zur Zahnbehandlung und Zahnpflege
EP0025073A1 *Sep 11, 1979Mar 18, 1981Jr. Walter Dorwin TeaguePower toothbrush or the like with orbital brush action
Classifications
U.S. Classification173/65, 15/24, 433/125, 415/904, 415/73
International ClassificationA61C17/30
Cooperative ClassificationY10S415/904, A61C17/30
European ClassificationA61C17/30