Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2493209 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1950
Filing dateJan 25, 1949
Priority dateJan 25, 1949
Also published asDE822666C
Publication numberUS 2493209 A, US 2493209A, US-A-2493209, US2493209 A, US2493209A
InventorsFrank A Simmons
Original AssigneeBurgess Battery Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spray or atomizer nozzle
US 2493209 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Jan. 3, 1950 F. A. slMMoNs 2,493,209

SPRAY OR ATOMIZER NOZZLE l Patented Jan. 3, 1950 SPRAY ORVATOMIZER NOZZLE Frank A. Simmons, Elgin, lll., asslgnor to Burgess Battery Company, Lake Zurich, Ill., a corporation of Delaware Application January 25, 1949, Serial No. 72,720

11 Claims. l

This invention relates to nozzles for atomizing liquids.

The principal purpose of the invention is to provide an extremely simple nozzle capable of dividing a stream of liquid into minute particles. A further object is to provide such a nozzle which is capable of atomizing a wide range of liquids, such as paints, enamels, oils, insecticides, and the like, and which may be manufactured without reference to exacting tolerances and which does notv require critical adjustments during use. A further object is to provide such a nozzle which also functions in a limited manner as a check valve to abruptly and completely check the flow of liquids when the operating pressure upon the liquid is relieved.

A host of more or less intricate structures have heretofore been proposed or used for the conversion of an integrated body of liquid into finely divided liquid particles projected through the atmosphere from the nozzle aperture or apertures in a broadening stream. The problem becomes increasingly diicult as the specified size of the particles is reduced. Also, a nozzle which may be capable of eiiiciently atomizing a liquid having certain physical characteristics may not properly serve to atomize liquids having different characteristics. The nozzle herein described, while very simple and inexpensive. is adapted to handle liquids having a wide range of viscosities, densities, and surface tension characteristics, and which differ in other respects.

In the accompanying drawing,

Fig. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a sprayer assembly including the nozzle of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view of one form of the essential elements of the nozzle separated for purposes of illustration;

Fig. 3 is a front view of the nozzle elements; and

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a modified form of the nozzle elements, separated for purposes of illustration.

A form of nozzle which may be readily produced in quantity and at low cost is illustrated in the drawing. It consists essentially of two apertured discs clamped together at their peripheries, the apertures being in nonalignment so that liquid flowing through the nozzle is required to flow an appreciable distance laterally between the two discs. The characteristics of the discs' and apertures for the most satisfactory operation of the atomizer nozzle are described below.

Disc I may be referred to as the inner disc since it is disposed inwardly from outer disc 2 in the nozzle and sprayer structure. Both of these discs may be conveniently formed from sheet metal, preferably a metal such as half hard brasswhich u.. Hsomeresilienoein thatthe spread apart by fluid pressure exerted between the discs and Will spring back together when the pressure has been relieved. It is not necessary that both discs I and 2 possess such resilient qualities, but it is desirable for best results that at least one of these members be somewhat springy or resilient. n

The two elements of the nozzle are preferably generally flat, since this is the most inexpensive and practical form to employ, but it should be understood that the surfaces forming the interface between the two elements may be other than planar, provided only that the engaging surfaces conform generally to each other.

Aperture 3 from which the ne liquid particles are emitted is preferably a sharp edged orifice which may be round, elongated to form a slot, as illustrated in Fig. 3, or otherwise shaped. Aperture 3 may be located anywhere in disc 2 inside of the marginal portion used for clamping, the central position illustrated being preferred to avoid interference with theatomized stream by the clamping nut 5. An outwardly protruding dent 6 is formed in disc 2 at the eventual location of aperture 3 to provide a small cavity 1 between the discs. Aperture 3 is then punched, pierced, or drilled at the apex of dent 6. In a properly controlled operation, the indentation and aperture may be formed by a tool which first draws the metal and then pierces it.

Aperture 4 may be formed in the same way as aperture 3, if desired, but it is not important whether an orifice with sharp edges is provided. Any small aperture which is not in alignment with aperture 3 in the assembled nozzle is satisfactory for the ,purposes of the invention. The area of aperture 4 should be roughly equal to that of aperture 3.

If desired, and if the capacity of the sprayer apparatus is sufficient to permit it, a plurality of apertures may be employed in either or both nozzle elements. Nozzle element I (Fig. 4), for example,.has three discharge apertures 8 equally spaced from each other and inner disc 9 has a single supply aperture I0 at its center.

The nozzle herein described can be used with any spraying equipment or pump capable of supplying fluid to the nozzle at pressure above, say; 30 pounds per square inch. The requisite pressure depends somewhat upon the characteristics of the nozzle elements and apertures. In the apparatus illustrated in Fig. 1, the fluid is drawn from a container, not shown, through tube I I vand inlet port I2 into chamber I3 of cylinder I4 by the reciprocating action of piston I5 acting in cooperation with check valve I6.` The fluid is forced into nozzle chamber I'I whence it ows through aperture 4 of inner nozzle disc I. The pressure of this fluid forces discs I and 2 apart to a slight extent to permit the p of the iluld through the lateral broad and shallow passageway thus provided to cavity 1 and aperture 3. The resilience of one or both of the nozzle elements tends of choke ci! or throttle the now of huid between the discs and the iiuid escapes from this pressure condition as it bursts into cavity 1. It is likely that there is considerable whirling and turbulence of the fluid within this cavity which is thought to cause the breaking up of the fluid into une particles as the material is emitted from discharge aperture 3.

Although, as stated above, discharge aperture l may be provided in any convenient shape,'it has been found that improved results are obtained when a slot is used. particularly when supply aperture 4 is laterally disposed with respect to the length of the slot in the nozzle assembly.

It will be understood that considerable variation is possible in the form and dimensions of the structure described without departing from the principles of the invention. As a specic example of one form of suitable structure. the following 1 dimensions of the discs and apertures when half hard brass is used are given:

Inches Diameter of discs Thickness of inner disc 0.010 Thickness of outer disc 0.010

Dimensions of slot in outer disc 0.040 x 0.008 Diameter of round aperture in inner disc Invention is claimed as follows:

l. An atomizer nozzle comprising two discs of thin sprlngy metal in abutting face-to-face relationship, one of said discs having a long and narrow slot therein, the portion of said disc immediately surrounding said slot being upstruck to form a lip around said slot and a cavity between said discs at said slot the other of said discs having an aperture therein in nonalignment with said slot, the portion of said disc immediately surrounding said aperture being upstruck to form a lip around said aperture and a cavity between said discs at said aperture.

2. An atomsizer nozzle in accordance with claim 1 wherein said aperture is laterally disposed with respect to the length of said slot.

3. An atomizer nozzle comprising outer and inner elements clamped together at their peripheries and having nonregistering apertures therein, at least one of said elements being resilient, each of said elements having a cavity inwardly of and communicating with the aperture therein, said elements being substantially in engagement at areas adjacent said cavities.

4. An atomizer nozzle comprising outer and inner elements clamped together at their peripheries and having nonregistering apertures therein, at least one of said elements being resilient, the aperture in each of said members communicating with a cavity formed inwardly therf-of and between said elements, said elements being substantially in engagement at areas adjacent said cavities.

5. An atomizer nozzle in accordance with claim 4 wherein an aperture in the outer element is a long 'and narrow slot.

6. An atomizer nozzle in accordance with claim 4 wherein an aperture in the outer element is a sharp-edged oriilce.

7. An atomizer nozzle comprising outer and inner elements clamped together at their peripheries and having central portions thereof in close proximity to each other. said elements having nonregistering apertures therein, at let one of said elements being resilient. the aperture in the outer element communicating with a cavity formed inwardly thereof and between said elements, andthe aperture in the inner element communicating with a cavity formed inwardly thereof and between said elements. whereby the pressure of fluid in said last-named cavity will force the iiuid between the elements to the cavity inwardly of the aperture in the outer element.

8. An atomizer nozzle comprising outer and inner elements clamped together at their peripheries and having nonregistering apertures therein, at least one of said elements being resilient, said elements normallybeing in face-toface contact with one another, the aperture in the outer element communicating with a cavity formed inwardly thereof and between said elements, and the aperture in the inner element communicating with a cavity formed inwardly thereof and between said elements, whereby the pressure of fluid in said last-named cavity will force the efemcnts out of face-to-face contact with one another and will force iiuid from the last-named cavity between the elements to the cavity inwardly of the aperture in the outer element.

9. An atomizer nozzle comprising outer and inner generally flat elements of thin resilient metal clamped together at their peripheries and having nonregistering apertures therein, each of said elements having a cavity inwardly of and communicating with the aperture therein, said elements being substantially in engagement at areas adjacent said cavities.

10. An atomizer nozzle comprising outer and inner generally flat elements of thin resilient metal clamped together at their peripheries and having nonregistering apertures therein, the aperture in each of said members communicating with a cavity formed inwardly thereof and between said elements, said elements being substantially in engagement at areas adjacent said cavities.

1l. An atomizer nozzle comprising outer and inner generally at elements of thin resilient metal clamped together at their peripheries and being otherwise unconiined and having nonregistering apertures therein, the aperture in each of`said members communicating with a cavity formed inwardly thereof and between said elements, said elements being substantially in engagement at areas adjacent said cavities.

FRANK A. SIMMONS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 236,719 Renton Jan. 18, 1881 1,567,051 Gronkwist Dec. 29, 1925 1,869,809 Hewlett' Aug. 2, 1932 2,273,830' Brierly et al Feb. 24, 1942 2,298,934 Foster Oct. 13, 1942 2,308,476 Gerrer Jan. 12, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 408,186 Great Britain Apr. 5, 1934 489,508 Germany Jan. 17, 1930

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US236719 *Jan 18, 1881 Vent-plug
US1567051 *Jun 27, 1921Dec 29, 1925Robert Gronkwist OscarMeans for injecting liquid fuel and other liquids into explosion motors, furnaces, and the like
US1869809 *Dec 24, 1930Aug 2, 1932Hewlett John MLiquid atomizing device
US2273830 *Nov 29, 1940Feb 24, 1942Ralph C BrierlyMethod of making nozzle sprayer plates
US2298934 *Feb 28, 1939Oct 13, 1942Foster Miles TSpray nozzle
US2308476 *Nov 13, 1939Jan 12, 1943Giles E BullockSpray disk for spray valves
DE489508C *Jan 17, 1930Friedr DeckelEinspritzduese fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen
GB408186A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2776660 *Nov 1, 1954Jan 8, 1957Paul PouliotHydromassaging device
US2785925 *Jan 23, 1953Mar 19, 1957Texas Metal And Mfg Company InDischarge nozzle
US2961741 *May 9, 1956Nov 29, 1960American Steel FoundriesHydraulic descaler
US2987262 *Nov 24, 1959Jun 6, 1961Lodding Engineering CorpRemovable and replaceable shower device
US3913846 *Jan 21, 1974Oct 21, 1975Robertshaw Controls CoGas burner orifice
US7222407Oct 26, 2004May 29, 2007Siemens Vdo Automotive CorporationMethods of making fluidic flow controller orifice disc for fuel injector
US7299997Oct 26, 2004Nov 27, 2007Siemens Vdo Automotive CorporationFuel injector with sauter-mean-diameter atomization spray of less than 70 microns
US7306172Oct 26, 2004Dec 11, 2007Siemens Vdo Automotive CorporationFluidic flow controller orifice disc with dual-flow divider for fuel injector
US7344090Oct 26, 2004Mar 18, 2008Siemens Vdo Automotive CorporationAsymmetric fluidic flow controller orifice disc for fuel injector
US7448560Oct 26, 2004Nov 11, 2008Continental Automotive Systems Us, Inc.Unitary fluidic flow controller orifice disc for fuel injector
US7469845Oct 26, 2004Dec 30, 2008Continental Automotive Systems Us, Inc.Fluidic flow controller orifice disc for fuel injector
US20040239045 *Jul 7, 2004Dec 2, 2004Albrecht David E.Flange plates for fluid port interfaces
US20050087627 *Oct 26, 2004Apr 28, 2005Hamid SayarFluidic flow controller orifice disc with dual-flow divider for fuel injector
US20050087628 *Oct 26, 2004Apr 28, 2005Hamid SayarAsymmetric fluidic flow controller orifice disc for fuel injector
US20050087629 *Oct 26, 2004Apr 28, 2005Hamid SayarFuel injector with sauter-mean-diameter atomization spray of less than 70 microns
US20050087630 *Oct 26, 2004Apr 28, 2005Hamid SayarUnitary fluidic flow controller orifice disc for fuel injector
US20050121543 *Oct 26, 2004Jun 9, 2005Hamid SayarMethods of making fluidic flow controller orifice disc for fuel injector
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/533.14, 239/596, 239/597
International ClassificationB05B1/14, B05B1/34, B05B1/00, B05B1/02, C07C305/04, C07C5/327, B05B9/04, B05B1/30
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/00, B05B1/34, B05B9/0426, B05B1/3006, B05B1/02, B05B1/14
European ClassificationB05B1/14, B05B1/34, B05B1/00, B05B1/02, B05B9/04B15, B05B1/30A