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Publication numberUS2493455 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1950
Filing dateFeb 2, 1946
Priority dateFeb 2, 1946
Publication numberUS 2493455 A, US 2493455A, US-A-2493455, US2493455 A, US2493455A
InventorsHarris George R
Original AssigneeZeigler Harris & Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flatiron stand
US 2493455 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. R. HARRIS FLATIRON STAND Jan. 3, 1950 Filed Feb. 2, 1946 INVENTOR:

g 1? Half/"1'5 HTTare/WEK Patented Jan. 3, 1950 I UNITED STATES F'I C'E I "2,493,455 a V @FLATIIRON STAND George R. HarriaMontro'se; Califl, assignor, by 'mesne assignments, to Zeigler-Harris *8; (30., I'nc.,-a corporation ofcaliforrfia Application February 2, 19.46,:Serial Macrame Claims.

This invention relates to flat irons and has particular reference to improvements in stands on'which to support such irons While in use.

Electrically heated irons are in general use in modernhomes and they are fitted to receive the end of alight cord extended from a wall socket. Thiscord usually overhangs the ironing board, when the iron is on its stand thereon, in such a manner that theperson doing the ironing, or any person passing by the ironing board, is liable to come in contact therewith and accidentally give it a jerk sufficiently strong to cause the iron to topple over and to land on the ironing board or on the floor.

A still greater danger is that curiosity,.or the desire to" play, will cause children to take hold of thecord and,.if theironer shou'ld happen at the moment to be absent from the board, to pull the iron off the stand and board, and serious burns often result from such accidents. .7

.Inview of the foregoing, it is the objector th present invention to provide animproved flatiron stand. More particularly, .it is my object to provide a stand which, when the iron is set thereon, forms a casing completely enveloping the body portion of the iron.

A further object is to provide such'a casing, out of which the iron may be lifted and into which it may again be seated as easily and conveniently as the iron is placed on any conventional'stand.

Another objectis toprovide an-iron encompassing stand from which theiron will not become-separated in case the stand .should topple over and even when it is dragged along the ironing board or the floor by accidental pulls on the cord thereof.

Finally it is the object of my invention to embody into such protective casing a heat-insulating lining to the end that the heat radiating from the iron may not penetrate to the outer surface of the casing.

With these and other objects in view, the invention resides in the combinations hereinafter described in detail, and drawings are hereto appended, in which a prefererd form of the invention is illustrated.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan View of a device embodying the invention as it appears when closed; a

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view showing a slightly modified form of the invention, in open position;

Fig. 3 is an end view of the device with the near end of the casing thereof broken away for thesake of clearness and showing a fiat iron in position therein; and

Fig. 4 illustrates the position taken by the (18-.- vice whenacc'identally toppled over.

As indicated in the drawings, the device is made-in two parts I .and 2, connected together byhinges 3. The part I is shown mounted on 1egs4 or" sufficientheight to maintain the device high enough above the supporting surface to permit the-part2 to swing into the openposition indicated 'in dotted outline in'Fig, 3 and in'full outline in .Fig...2-, when the'iron is removed from the device. ItisIfurthermore to be noted that a platei issecured to the .part 2 to rest on the inner surface of the part -I when the casing is closed,. as'indicated in Figs. 1 and 3, but to rise into the dottedline position of Fig. 3 when the part- 2 isswung open. InIFig. 2 thisplate, 6, is shown shaped somewhat difierently, merely to indicate-that the-particular-width of this part is immaterial; it may be made as wide as desired.

When the casing is standing on its legs, and beforethe iron is placedtherein, the part 2 takes the open position indicated in Figs. 2 andB. Actuallyitwould take thesameposition in Fig. 1, and it is-in that view shown closed merely in order better to indicate the general outline of part 2.

' The ironis placed within the casing by moving it from the l-left side against the elevated-plate 5 thereby to-cause this-plate to swing into the full line position S -and the part -2 to :swing upward into vclosedposition. When it is desiredagain to remove -.the iron, it is-merely required to liftit out ofthecasingaand the part2 is by gravity again swung Y open.

It is important to note that this seating and removing operation is no more difficult than the placing of the iron on an ordinary support.

But it is more important to observe that the iron can only be removed from the casing by lifting it straight out thereof and that it is, by the plate 5 shown in Fig. 1 or plate 6 of Fig. 2, locked in position therein if it is attempted to pull it out of the casing sidewise or when the device is toppled over to one side, as indicated in Fig. 4, or to the other. It may be dragged along the floor by its cord, but it cannot become detached therefrom until returned to upright position. And, as the casing is heat insulated, it may be picked by hand and set on its legs without danger of injury to the person handling it.

The insulating is conveniently effected by placing a lining of sheet asbestos I, 8, or the like, within the casing, whereupon an inner metal lining a, It may be added, if desired, although, when the plate is made substantially the full 7 length of the open space within the casing, such bottomof the casing, as indicated at [2, in Fig.

I claim:

7 moving the plate into contact with the base surface of the wider casing portion, and heat insulating lining within the casing, the upper edge of 1 said lining being held locked within the curled 1. A flat iron stand comprising, a casing shaped f to encompass the bottom and sides of a flat iron,

said casing being made in two" parts hinged to; gether lengthwise of the base thereof, legs maintaining one of said parts elevated above a support, the other part normallyby its ownrwe'ight maintained downwardly and outwardly swung open, and a plate rigidly'secured to said normally open part and substantially vertically projecting therefrom, said plate being contacted by the iron when the latter is placed in position within the casing to come tofrest against the base surface of the first named part when the'casing is closed about the iron. v

2; A fiat iron stand comprising, a casing shaped to encompass the bottom and sides of a flat iron, said casing being divided lengthwise, of the base thereof into a wider, portion mounted 'on legs, the narrower portion of the casing being hingedly connected to the wider portion thereof and by its own weight free to swing outwardly and downwardly from the wider portion, a plate extending fromjthe narrow portion of thecasing to swing therewith on the casing'hinge andto-come to rest against thebase su'rface of 'the'wide portion when the casing is closed about the iron, the latter being seatable in the casing by; contact with said plate and by moving the plateinto contact with the base surface of the' wider casing portion? j V 3. A flat 'iron stand comprising, a sheet metal casinglshaped to encompass the bottom and sides of a fiat iron, the upper edge of the casing being inwardly curled, the casing being divided lengthw isibf the ate thereof into a wider portion,

mounted on legsjthe narrower portion of the casing being hingedly connected to the wider portion'thereof and by its own weight free to swing outwardly and downwardly from the wider portion, a plate extending from the narrow portion of the casing to swing therewith on the casing hinge and to come to rest against the base surface of the wide portion when the casing is closed about the ironjthe latter bein'g seatable in the casing by contact with said plate and by edge'of the casing.

4. A flat iron stand comprising, a casing shaped to encompassthe bottomhnd-sidesOf, a fiat iron, the; upper' edge "of the casin'g being inwardly curled, the casing being divided lengthwise of the base thereof on a straight line beginning at the pointed front end of the casing and continuing closer to one side edge thereof into a wider portion mounted on legs and a narrower potrion,

the narrower portion of the casing being hingedly -econnected to the wider portion thereof and by its own weight free to swing outwardly and downwardly from the wider portion, a plate extending from the narrow portion of the casing to swing therewith on the casing hinge and to come to rest against the base surface of the wider portion when the casing is closed about the .ironQthe V latter being 'seatable in the casing by contact with said plate and by, moving the plate into base and slanting sides of the iron, said casing being divided into a wider and a narrower part on a straight line extending from the pointed front end thereof to the rear end thereof nearer one side edge thereof, hinges interconnecting the two parts, a plate rising from .inneredg'e of the narrow part ofthe casing to swing-with that narrower part on said hinges until it comes to rest on' the base surface of the wider part when the cas'ingis closed, the narrowlcasing p'artbeing free to swing outward and downward on the hinges to ,openthe casing to provide space for seating of an iron, heat insulating lining within the casing, and vents for carrying heat from the iron through said lining and the outer shell of the casing.

GEORGE R. HARRIS.

7 REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

1,927,431 Wuenker Sept. 19, 1933

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US392861 *Sep 3, 1888Nov 13, 1888 Safety device for druggistss bottles
US1626101 *Apr 27, 1925Apr 26, 1927Harry SeigmanRest for sadiron
US1927431 *Jan 9, 1932Sep 19, 1933Wuenker Ralph FIron stand
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2584370 *Apr 20, 1949Feb 5, 1952Rickles William TLaundry iron support
US3967802 *Sep 4, 1974Jul 6, 1976Marcel LomagnoSafety stand for irons
EP0953670A1 *Apr 19, 1999Nov 3, 1999EMMEPI di MANFRENUZZI MARIAHolding and support element for irons
WO2008148208A1 *Jun 6, 2008Dec 11, 2008Cvtech R & D Inc.Driven pulley for a continuously variable transmission
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/117.3
International ClassificationD06F79/00, D06F79/02
Cooperative ClassificationD06F79/02
European ClassificationD06F79/02