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Publication numberUS2493470 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1950
Filing dateMay 12, 1944
Priority dateMay 12, 1944
Publication numberUS 2493470 A, US 2493470A, US-A-2493470, US2493470 A, US2493470A
InventorsBruce E Tau
Original AssigneeFreyn Engineering Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stove checker assembly
US 2493470 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 3, 1950 B. E. TAU

STOVE CHECKER ASISEMBLY Filed May l2, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet l Bruce E. Ta u..

'Patented Jan. 3, 1950 PATENT OFEICE s'rovr: casona-ASSEMBLY Bruce E. Tau, Chicago, lll., assignor to Freyn Engineering Company, Chicago, lll., a corporation of Maine Application May 12. 1944, Serial No. 535,271

ZCiaima.

The present invention relates to improvements in stove checker assembly.

More particularly the present invention relates to improvements in the heat interchanser elements of hot blast stoves.

It is common practice to build a hot blast stove with an annular ring wall and to provide the interior oi the stove with an assembly of checkers. which checkers provide a plurality of passageways for products of combustion for supplying heat to said checkers, which passageways in turn permit the flow of air to be heated by said checkers.

The checkers used in hot blast stoves are subjected to very high temperatures and should be supported in a substantial manner by the ring wall. Moreover, the checkers must be replaced at times, and it is important that the matter of replacement be made as simple as possible.

In certain arrangements of checkers the outer surface of the checker body is characterized by a very irregular serrated contour. It is difllcult to build a satisfactory ring wall to join this contour satisfactorily. According to certain prior constructions the ring wall has been made up of a combination of key bricks and straight bricks laid radially to make a ring wall having a substantially smooth exterior contour and a substantially smooth interior contour. The space between the smooth interior contour and the irregular serrated contour of the checker body has been iilled with irregularly shaped pieces of brick or the like and with clay. The construction just described has the disadvantage that the ring wall does not serve as a substantial support for the checker body, inasmuch as the intermediate filling between the interior surface of the ring wall and the exterior surface of the checker body is not strong. This type of construction lacks stability. This type of construction has the further disadvantage that if and when the checker body or portions thereof are removed for replacement, the illling material between the interior contour of the ring wall and the outer surface of the checker body falls oil', inasmuch as it is not bonded to the ring wall and has very littlel inherent stability.

According to another prior construction, the ring wall is made up entirely of standard straight bricks. Considerable diillculty has been experienced in fitting these bricks to the irregular contour of the exterior of the checker body to provide the relatively intimate iit which is desired in orderv that the ring wall will Serve t (Cl. 'Iz-102) 2 support the checker body for providing stabity. In order to accomplish such nt it was necessary to cut a large number of bricks, usually by sawing. This involved a relatively great time i'or construction and relatively high construction cost. In some cases itwas sought to obviate this high cost by omitting the relatively intimate ilt between the ring walland the exterior of the checker body and instead illling the space between the ring wall and the checker body inthe manner generally described in previous paragraphs. This construction had the disadvantage above mentioned.

An object of the present invention is to provide a stove construction in which the interior of the ring wall and the exterior of the checker body engage along chords bounding the periphery of the checker body.

A further object is to provide an improved stove construction in which the periphery of the checker body is provided by a relatively small number of specially constructed checkers i'or pro' viding a checker body having its exterior surface arranged along ilat surfaces to which the ring wall may be intimately fitted without the expenditure of excessive time and/or labor.

A further object is to provide a stove construction in which the checker body has its exterior disposed in a plurality of planes to which the ring wall may be tted', leaving the exterior oi the ring wall with an irregular contour, ii desired, where the irregularity is of relatively small consequence.

A further object is to provide an improved edge checker for a checker body, which edge checker is useful in building a checker body the exterior wall of which is bounded by plane surfaces.

A further object is to provide a checker construction for a hot blast stove utilizing forthe most part checkers of standard construction and a relatively small number oi checkers of nonstandard construction to provide a checker body having its exterior wall bounded by plane surfaces.

A further object is to provide a hot blast stove construction which is simple and sturdy, which can be easily repaired and which meets the needs of commercial operation.

Further objects will appear as the description proceeds. V

Referring to the drawings- 56 Figure l is a sectional view oi' a portion of a blast furnace stove embodying the principles of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a top plan view of one of the standard checkers utilized in the construction illustrated in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a top plan view of a half checker such' as utilized in forming the exterior wall of the checker body illustrated in Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a top plan view of another type of edge checker utilized in forming the exterior wall of the checker body illustrated in Figure l; and

Figure 5 is a. sectional view taken along the plane indicated by the arrows 5-5 of Figure 2 or Figure 4.

Figure l represents in horizontal section half of a blast furnace stove, said blast furnace stove havingthe ring wall I within which is the usual combustion chamber wall II providingfthe combustion chamber I2. Said ring wall I0 is made up of bricks and has a generally cylindrical `ex terior, though according to the present invention the exterior wall may be more or less serrated. Surrounding the ring wall I0 is the shell I3, and located between the exterior of the ring wall I0 and the shell I3 is a body of insulating material indicated by the numeral I4. This insulating material may bemerely of a illler character and need have no bond with the ring wall I0 or the shell I3. Accordingly, the bricks presented to the exterior of the ring wall I0 maybe permitted to present a rather irregular surface, and the cutting of the bricks need not be exact. As will be explained as the description proceeds, the interior surface of the ring wall I0 will be a series Vof planes. Considering the perimeter of the inner surface of thelring wall I0 at any elevation, said perimeter is bounded by a plurality of chords.

, The numerals I-I5 indicate checkers of a known type, a large number of which are assembled within the ring wall I0 to constitute heat storing and heat transmitting bodies for storing up heat from products of combustion when the hot blast stove is on gas and for giving up heat to air passing through the stove when the stove is on blast.

The checkers I5-I5 are of standard construction, the illustrated checker being the seven-hole type. The checker I5 chosen for illustration has a cross section in the shape of a regular hexagon, thisl meaning that the exterior fiat surfaces I I-I 6 thereof lie in an equiangular, equilateral hexagon.

I Medially of the checker I5 is the center hole I'I.

Disposed in a circle about the center hole I'I are six other holes I8I8. The top side of the checker I5 is provided with a relatively shallow circular recess I9. 'I'he flat surfaces I6-I6 of the checker I5 are joined by the arcuate portions 2lb-20. Extending transversely of the checker 'I5 is thearcuate groove 2I providing communication between the holes I'I, I8 and the arcuate surfaces 20-20. In the claims, checkers having a cross sectional contour of a regular polygon will be referred to as regular checkers.

An assembly of standard or regular checkers such as those indicated by the numerals I5`I5 will produce a serrated exterior wall of the checker body, and accordingly the present invention contemplates the use of supplementary checkers in cooperation with the standard or regular checkers I5-I5 to produce an exterior wall for the checker body bounded by plane surfaces.

Figure 3 illustrates one of these auxiliary checkers, said checker being indicated by the numeral 22. Said checker. it will be noted, is half of a standard checker, the standard checker I5 being divided along a plane symmetrically disposed with respect to the groove 2l. In other words, the checker shown in Figure 3 has a cross sectional contour bounded by the sides of half of a hexagon, the dividing line being parallel with one side of said hexagon and passing through'the center of said hexagon.

Another supplementary 'checker contemplated by the present invention is illustrated in Figures 4 and 5 and is indicated by the numeral 23. Said checker 23 is similar in many respects to the standard checker I5, including height, but differs from the standard checker I5 in the respect that it embodies extra material and in the further particular that instead of beingbounded by six sides lying in a hexagon it is bounded by a symmetrical five-sided figure pentagon. Figure 4 shows in broken lines how a hexagon bounding a correspondingchecker I5 would appear superimposed upon the supplementary checker 23.' Said'checker 23 includes four fiat faces I6 equal to the corresponding flat faces I6 of the checker 23. Said checker 23 includes the broad fiat face 24,

the plane of which is disposed in symmetricalrelationship with the flat faces IG-IB. In the illustrated embodiment of the present invention, a vertex of the hexagon bounding the faces IG--I 6 of the checker I5 would lie in the plane of the flat face 24 of the checker 28. Expressed in other language, the ,supplementary checker 23 has its flat sides bounded by a pentagon, four faces of which are equal to those of the corresponding standard or regular checker I5. v'I'he fifth side of said pentagon, as the member 23 is illustrated, lies approximately at the vertex of the two remaining sides of the hexagon dening the corresponding checker I5. l

The supplementary checker 23 has the grooves 2li-20 like those in the corresponding standard or regular checker I5, and has the seven holes, I8, corresponding to those in the vstandard checker I5. Two of the grooves adjoining diametrically opposite side faces I5`I6 are semicircular, -as indicated by the numerals 25-25,

yand adjoining said grooves 2li-25 are the iiat faces 2li-2G, which are in the same planes as the adjacent faces IG-IG. The lines defining the faces lli-I6, 26-26 of the checker 23 are in colinear relationship with the corresponding regular hexagon bounding the faces of the regular checker I5, as clearly indicated in Figure 4. The checker 23 is provided at the top thereof with the transverse groove 2l communicatingwith one of the grooves 20 and with the circular recess I9. The pentagonal checker 23 is structurally strong because the outer wall or envelope is continuous and is braced by the partitions between the holes.

The half checkers 22 and the pentagon checkers 23, as noted above, are supplementary checkers and for convenience may be referred to as edge checkers. Said edge checkers 22 and 23 are, according to the present invention, mounted in assembled relationshipwith the standard checkers I5 to provide the fiat surfaces bounding the checker body within the ring wall I0.' Considering any horizontal plane throughout the height of the checker assembly within the ring wall I0, the perimeter of the plane figure denoting the cross section at that particular height is bounded by chords, the chords which bound the half checkers interspersed with regular checkers being indicated by the numerals 28-28 and' the chords bounding the pentagon checkers being indicated by the numerals 29-29.4 The angle between one chord and the next adjacent chord is produced by combination of 90 and 60 angles resulting from the 90 and the 60 corners of the hexagons, half hexagons and the pentagons. In all cases the angle between adjacent chords and 29 equals 90 plus 60, or 150. For instance, considering the chord 2l formed by regular checkers and half checkers shown horizontally at the top of Figure l, the angle with the chord 29 shown at the right thereof and resulting from the combination of pentagon edge checkers is' made up of 60 between the long face and adjacent short face of a halt checker' plus 90 be tween the faces 2|, 28 o1 the pentagon edge checker. The same applies with reference to all oi' the other contiguous chords comprising the ring wall.

It is obvious that the radius applying to the right extremity of a given chord, 28shown at the top of Figure l, is cJincident with the radius at the left extremity of the next adjacent chord 29 to the right. It-is likewise obvious that the radius at the right extremity of said adjacent chord 29 is coincident with the radius of the adjacent chord to the right thereof. Since these radii are equal, the chords have their extremities within a circle.

A study of Figure 1 discloses the fact that there are three exterior chordal surfaces in each 90 sector of the checker assembly. If the checker assembly'were carried out throughout the whole cross-sectional area of the stove including the combustion chamber, the resulting grouping of checkers would be a twelve-sided polygon. In

conformity therewith the ring wall would have an interior configuration of a twelve-sided poly;

bounded by ilat surfaces, it is a relatively simple matter to build up the ring wall i0 to engage said ilat surfaces. The numeral 30 indicates generally a course of bricks, and the numeral 3| indicates another course of bricks at a diilerent level from the course 30. Said courses 30 and 3i may alternate throughout the height of the checker body. The amount of cutting oi bricks in the ring wall i0 is minimized, and an-intimate relationship is obtained between the ring wall and the checker body. This contributes to the stability ot the checker body and also permits the removal of any portion of the checkers without disturbing the ring wall. Replacement checkers can be inserted with ease.

When the bricks in the ring wall i0 are laid in the general manner indicated by the numerals 30'and 3l in Figure ,1, an irregular outer contour is likely to result. This is of small consequence because a substantial space between the inside of the shell i4 and the exterior of the ring wall I0 is normally provided to permit expansion of the stove with respect to the stove shell and also to permit the insertion of insulating material, which is merely of filler character and which need have no bond with the ring wall. For this reason the bricks on the exterior of the ring wall I0 may present a somewhat irregular. surface and the cutting, if any, need not be exact.

In the construction shown in the drawings the checkers comprise standard hexagonal checkers, half checkers and pentagonal checkers. It will be understood, of course, that it may be preferred to use other shapes of standard or regular checkers. It may also be preferred to use other shapes of, supplementary or edge checkers, as for example a three-quarters checker, that isa checker constituting three-quarters or some other fraction of a standard or regular checker.

Though a preferred embodiment of the present invention has been described in detail, many modications will occur to those skilled in the art. It is intended to cover all such modifications that fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is- Y i 1. In combination, in an assembly of checkers, regular checkers each having across sectional contour in the form of a regular hexagon, supplementary checkers each comprising half of a regular checker divided along a plane extending through opposite vertices of said regular hexagon and other supplementary checkers each having a cross sectional contour in the form of a pentagon symmetrical about an axis, four sides of said pentagon lying in colinear relationship with the sides of said regular hexagon, two opposite sides of said pentagon being parallel with said axis of symmetry and disposed at right angles to the ,each of said pentagonal checkers includes a continuous outer wall braced by partitions between said holes, said regular checkers and said first mentioned supplementary checkers being arranged in alternate side by side relationship with one another forming a group, the non-hexagonal sides of said group of said first mentioned supplementary checkers being disposed in coplanar relationship with sides of said regular checkers forming an extended riatsurface along the exterior wall 'of said assembly, said second men-v tioned supplementary checkers of another group being disposed with their said opposite sides in side by side relationship with the iifth sides thereof disposed in coplanar relationship forming a second extended dat surface of said assembly, an end checker ofthe iirst group and an end checker of the other group being disposed in side by side relationship, forming a corner construction with the extended at surfaces angularly disposed.

2. In combination, in an assembly of checkers, regular checkers each having a cross sectional contour in the form of a regular hexagon, supplementary checkers each comprising half of a regular checker divided along a plane extending through opposite vertices of said regular hexagon and other supplementary checkers each having a cross `sectional contour in the form of a pentagon symmetrical about an axis, four sides of said pentagon lying in colinear relationship with the sides of said regular hexagon, two opposite sides of said pentagon being parallel with said axis of symmetry and disposed at right angles to the fifth side, said fifth side being at least as close to the center of the corresponding hexagon as a vertex of said hexagon, each of Said checkers of pentagonal contour being provided with a plurality of holes extending therethrough, all sides of said pentagon being located outside of said holes, whereby each of said pentagonal checkers includes a continuous outer wall braced by partitions between said holes, said regular checkers and said iirst mentioned supplementary checkers being arranged in alternate side by side rela` tionship with one another forming a group, the

non-hexagonal sides of said group of said rst mentioned supplementary checkers being disposed in coplanar relationship with sides of said regular checkers forming an extended flat surface along the exterior Wall of said assembly, said second mentioned supplementary checkers of another group being 'l i disposed with their said opposite sides in side by side relationship with the fifth sides thereof disposed in coplanar relationship forming a second extended fiat surface. of said assembly, an end checker of the iirst group and an end checker of the other group being disposed in side by side relationship. forming a corner lconstruction with the extended flat surfaces engularly disposed.

BRUCE E. TAU.

REFERENCES crnsn file of bhispant:

Number Number 's mmm s'rs'rns rsm'rs Nome Date csi-gm et si. oet. 1w,v laas wm nb. 21,1905 stmk Aus. 7, 192s Kernen Oct. 12. 1937 mee my 2, 1939 mman Psmrs country new France July 3, 1984 am: 11i-1am sus. zo. 193s

Patent Citations
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US329012 *Oct 27, 1885 Metallic flooir and surface
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GB512131A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2936162 *Jul 26, 1956May 10, 1960Wulff Process CompanyCeramic checker and assembly thereof
US3923410 *Oct 21, 1974Dec 2, 1975Langsdorff BauPerforated interlocking slab
US3979871 *Dec 5, 1974Sep 14, 1976Pollock Eugene BModular floor structure
US4012881 *Dec 6, 1974Mar 22, 1977Elio MartiradonnaArchitectural modular elements for forming and-or completing monuments or like works of art
US4282923 *Nov 15, 1978Aug 11, 1981Gr-Stein Refractories LimitedRegenerative heat exchange systems
US6631603 *Jun 11, 2001Oct 14, 2003Hexablock, Inc.Building structures
US20120237294 *Oct 26, 2010Sep 20, 2012Sun Woo LimRoad restoration block
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/9.4, 404/42, 52/607, 165/DIG.350, 52/604, 52/606, 404/41
International ClassificationC21B9/06
Cooperative ClassificationY10S165/035, C21B9/06
European ClassificationC21B9/06