Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2493488 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1950
Filing dateMar 21, 1945
Priority dateMar 21, 1945
Publication numberUS 2493488 A, US 2493488A, US-A-2493488, US2493488 A, US2493488A
InventorsWayne D Jordan, Paul D Van Vliet
Original AssigneeLiquid Carbonic Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Two temperature refrigerator, including a humidity control system
US 2493488 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jam 3, 1950 w. D. JORDAN ETAL 2,493,488

TWO-TEMPERATURE REFRIGERATOR, INCLUDING A HUMIDITY CONTROL SYSTEM Filed March 21, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 @PMA m Jan. 3, 1950 w. D. JORDAN ET AL 2,493,488

TWO-TEMPERATURE REFRIGERATOR, INCLUDING A HUMIDITY CONTROL SYSTEM Filed March 2l, 1945 l 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 bij Patented Jan. 3, 1950 TWO TEMPERATURE REFRIGERATOR, IN- CLUDING A HUMIDITY CONTROL SYSTEM Wayne D. Jordan, Chicago. and Paul D. Van

Vliet, Galesburg, Ill., assgnors to Liquid Carbonc Corporation, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Delaware Application March` 21, 194,5, Serial No. 583,924 v (Cl. 621l6) 8 Claims. l

This invention relates to an improvement in. refrigerators and is adapted Yfor use in donlestlo` refrigerators.

One purposeI isY to provide an improved. two temperature refrigerator.

Another purpose is .tol provide a two temperature refrigerator having 'separate refrigerating means for a relatively high temperature and a low temperaturestorage space, the Storage spaces being separate, and insulated.

Another purpose is to provide improved means for controlling the relative humidity Of air in a refrigerator storage cabinet.

Another purpose is to provide improved means for freezing ice cubes and for at the same timev controlling the relative humidity of a refrigerator storage cabinet.l

vAnother purpose is to provide a refrigerator cabinet having means for freezing ice cubes in a relatively high temperature storage space without unduly dehydrating the foods in such storage space.

Another purpose is-to'provide a means of and method Yfor employing ice cube freezing means to control the relative humidity of a refrigerator storage space in which food is stored at temperatures above freezing.

Another purpose is to provide means for preventing excess humidity in a refrigeration storage cabinet in which the food is stored at temperatures above freezing.

Other purposes will appear from time to time in the course of the'specication and claims.

The invention 'is illustrated more or less diagrammatically yin Y the accompanying drawings wherein:

Figure 1 is a vertical section of a two temperature refrigerator; 1

Figure 2 is a section at the line 2--2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a vsectional view showing a modification of Figure 1 Figure 4 is a section at the line 4-4 of Figure 3; and

Figure 5 is a sectional View showing a further modification.

Like parts are indicated by like symbols throughout the specification and drawings.

Referring'to the drawings,`A generally indicates a food storage cabinet including an insulated back wall I, insulated side walls '2, an insulated top wall 3,` an insulated bottom wall 4, and an insulated intermediate partition 5. The above mentioned walls and partitions` define two storage. compartments which are separated from and insulated from each other. i is an insulated door for the upper compartment and l an insulated door for the lower compartment. Thus the two. storage compartments are insulated from each other and. from the, outside air. Any Suitable gasketmg or sealing means 8 may be employed., it being understood that the details of the walls.I doors and sealing means do not of themselves form part of the present invention. Any suitable means may be employed for limiting to a mini.- mum heat transfer between the inside of the compartments and the outside air, and between they two compartments.

For convenience, the uppercompartment 15in.- dicated as B and the lower compartment as C'. Located below the lower compartment C 'isv an uninsulated space D for the condensing unit.

The upper storage compartment B is preferably held at a relatively high temperature, as from 35 to 45 degrees Fahrenheit. TheA interior of the compartment C may be maintained at a tem-r perature substantially below freezing, as from 0 to l0 degrees in order lto adapt it for quick freezing and for cold storage of frozen goods.

In the form of Figures l and following adual refrigerating system is employed having two separate refrigerant condensing units, with eva.1 io'` rators in circuit with each unit, there being' thus a complete and independent refrigeratingv system for each of the abovementioned storage corn-A partments.

Referring to the details of the compartmentsd it is advantageous to employ ar liner or sleeve of sheet metal for each compartment, with evapo-` rator coils on the exterior of each such sleeve, in heat transfer relationship therewith. In connection with the upper compartment B is indicated a sleeve including a vertical rear wall I I, side wall I2, a top wall I3 and a bottom wall I4. l5 indicates an evaporator coilv which may extend about three sides of the liner' or sleeve thus formed, namely about the rear wall II and each of the side walls I2. The length of the coil and the area of walls with which it is in Contact may be varied to cause the refrigerant to be evaporated at the desired temperature, preferably somewhatv above freezing, to prevent frost and to minimize dew formation on the walls, and to insure a suff'lciently vhigh relative humidity to prevent dehumidiflcation of stored food.. The storage space of the compartment B is bounded at the bottom by an insulating food storage shelf I6 which is Shown as supported several inches above the bottom wall I4, of the upper sleeve. It is convenient to identify the space belowvthe insulating food shelf as the ice cubefOrming-andstOrage commeans and to design the gap from'shelf to wall partment E. In the compartment E is illustrated a shelf including an evaporator coil I'I, this coil orV evaporator being in series with the evaporator I5. A restrictor 4I is interposed in the line 40 between evaporator I5 and evaporator I'I,-to reduce refrigerant pressure on evaporator II, which is thus made effective to freeze the contents of any suitable ice cube tray or trays I 8. Positioned below the evaporator II is any suitable defrosting.

pan I9. Any suitable gap or gaps 2n may be ernployed between the insulating shelf I6 and the side walls and door of the compartment B. This air gap provides a connecting vapor path or paths between the compartment E and the compartment B, to permit excess water vapor to beV withdrawn from the air inY compartment B. The storage shelf I6 may be permanently fixed in relation ,v

to the upper sleeve, with suitable'gapsY or apertures provided, or it may be removably mounted air gap. It will be understood however that any.

other suitable means may be employed for maintaining the desiredcontrol. Or, it may be advantageous to omit any such variable control to produce the desired average condition.

vIn compartment C is a liner sleeve toplwall 28., Asinthe'case ofV the upper sleeve,

anyfsuitable evaporator .coil 29 Vmay extend about- Ythe sleeve," being Y'preferably exterior thereto but Yivnfheat transfer relationship. therewith..V The length and shape of the coil may be varied to suit. desired conditions but it may advantageously ex-V tend about the walls 25, 26 Yand 28,. beingpref-rI erably omitted from'the bottoml wall lI.H

' With reference to the refrigerantY condensingunit, Vanysuitable means may be used.Vv VThe par-- ticlar .mechanisms -herein illustrated, however,

are ofthe mechanical type. With reference to their details, two compressorsV are employed, 33

yfor the lower sleeve and 30a for the upper sleeve.-

suitablemeans may be employed for Vfeeding refrigerant. .The lower-sleeve, is thus cooledto-a temperature from zero to plus 15 degrees Fahrenheit, and the evaporated refrigerant returns by the suction Yline 34 to thecompressorf30. "35 indicates any suitable motor for'the compressor ,'30, which may be controlledby any suitable ther-V mostatically operable switch 36, which may for, example include the bulb 31 in the-compartmentt'xv Y Y Q Y' f Tracing the circuit for the upper sleeve, the liquidV refrigerant is 'delivered through the restrictor tube 33a to the Vevaporator I5,'cooling that sleeve to a temperature between 35 and 45 degrees. Preferably the refrigerant is evaporated at such a pressure and corresponding temperature Yin evaporator I5, that the surface Aof the upper sleeve is kept at or above freezing, thus preventing the formation of frost andgminirniz-r includingVY the back wall 25, sidewalls 26, bottom wall 21 and.

.4 ing deposit of dew on the walls. Refrigerant from the evaporator I5 flows through the return passage 4I) to any suitable restriction 4I, which causes a further pressure drop and consequent temperature drop in the refrigerant which thereafter flows through the passage 42 to the evaporator 'I'I and there evaporates at a temperature low enough to cause the freezing of ice cubes or other material in the compartment E. The evaporated refrigerant then returns along the return duct 43 to the compressor 30a. 44 indicates Va motor'for the compressor 30a, this motor being controlledby any suitable means such as for example the thermally operable switch 45 associated with the bulb 46 located at any suitable point in the upper compartment.

With reference to Figure 1 it will be understood that the motors 35 and 44 may be employed to drive fans which circulate air through the individual condensers 32 and 32a, or a chimney, at therear. ofthe enclosing structure may beVV used. to. create an air.. current. through the.

condenser. In the form of Figure 5 a double circuit condenser 50 is illustrated whichincludes separate condenser coils 5I and 52, onev being in 's circuit with the compressor 30 and the other with the vcompressor 30a, but-both coils associated.

with a single fin structure. Y

' itwill be understood that under some circumstances it may be placed at the topor the side of the compartment, with any suitable enclosure means limiting interchange ofV air between compartments B and E through convection currents, but making possible the free movement of water vapor between the compartments. f

. It v.will be realized that, Whereas, a practical "andi operative device is described and illustrated,

nevertheless many changes may be made in the size, shape, number and Ydisposition of* parts without departing from the spirit ofthe invention. `.Therefore Ythe description. and drawings Y are tov be taken asin abroad sense illustrative or diagrammatic ratherlthan as limited Vto the precise showing. Y

The use and operation of the invention are as follows:

` The, domestic refrigerator -of the usual type has an evaporator "serving'both to cool the food storage space andto freeze ice. To freeze ice the. evaporator must operate at aY refrigerant temperature so low as `to produce excessively dry airy The .relative humidity of the air to which food is exposed may run from 20 to 40% which dehydrates meats, fruits and vegetables.

.To-avoid that dehydration it is the practice with some to cool the space by` means of a refrigerated liner surface,` the cool area being sufciently great so that the sleevey temperature need be only a few degrees below the wanted space temperature, witha minimum of around 32 degree's. perature` during *off-cycles of the 'condensing unit due to heat leakage'through insulation to.

the liner wall; Itmayrlse to 40 degrees or above. By this meansV much less moisture is condensed the relative humidity is therefore high;

j' Moisture entering with new air admitted whenY the door is vropened will condense as dew largely lon the coldest surfacesthe liner wall during the 'on-cycles-and will'partly'or wholly evaporate during off-cycles when thewall is warm. Theiextent ofthe evaporation will bev limited by This cold wall will assume a higher temthe time between onrcycles-,andthe relative vapor pressures between water on the cold wall and water in the air.

Should the cold Vwall rise to 40 degrees the vapor pressures Ywill come to balance at 100% humidity, providing suflicient time elapses for evaporation between on-cycles. Actually 'the cold wall may exceed 40 degrees.

With air at such high humidity there is certain to be condensation of moisture on Shelves and stored food at times when the temperature of the wet Wall is above that of the shelves and stored food. This creates an unsanitary condition and causes deterioration of meats and other foods. Another fault is that in humid weather sufficient moisture may enter with incoming air to cause Water to condense on and run down the side walls and pool on the liner floor. This also is unsanitary.

In our refrigerator weuse the cold wall means for space cooling, with the refrigerant coil external to but in thermal contact with the sleeve. To correct the faulty conditions mentioned we use the colder surface of the ice freezing evaporator to condense such water vapor as would cause a humidity above, say 85%.

We place the refrigerated ice cube freezing shelf near the floor of the liner and locate a storage shelf of W heat conductivity immediately above it. This storage shelf is dirnensioned t0 give an open space on all sides to permit water vapor to pass from the upper storage chamber to the cold shelf space.

AWe place the shelf at the bottom of the liner to prevent air interchange between the two spaces by convection, the colder air surrounding the ice freezing shelf being colder and there-fore denser. Water vapor, however, is free to pass downward under a head set up by the differential in vapor pressures above and below, and this vapor ow is controlled in amount by the size of the openings provided between the lower food shelf and surrounding walls,` as Well as by the refrigerant temperature maintained in the ice freezing coil.

The ice freezing coil temperature, selected for purposes both of controllingv humidity and of freezing ice at the required rate, isobtainecl by interposing a Xed restrictor lbetween the space cooling coil and the ice freezing coil, resulting in a temperature of sleeve surface at or slightly above 32 degrees and in the ice coil of from 10 to degrees, These vary during the cycle and with the conditions of loading. By this construction we find it readily possible to hold the relative humidity at from 60 to 85% under widely varying ambient air conditions. At such humidities the liner wall may at times be moist when door openings are frequent in humid weather but at no time does it run down the wall or deposit on shelves or food.

Food is not dehydrated and open storage of food is made possible, avoiding the loss of space occasioned by the use of covered containers.

It is not essential that the ice freezing shelf be located at the bottom of the food storage chamber. An insulating housing around an ice freezing shelf or shelves at top or side, so arranged as to prevent interchange of air by convection currents but permitting vapor movement, will give the same control of humidity.

The refrigerator described may be made alone or we may'combine it with a second food compartment, all within one insulated housing, refrigerated with a second expansion coil and condensing unit, holding a temperature below freezing for storage of frozen foods. In this case the two refrigerating systems are wholly separate and independent in operation.

Or we may use a single condenser structure having a single iin assembly but two separate refrigerant tube circuits, both in thermal contact with the same fins, this z-circuit condenser serving two otherwise independent refrigerating means.

We may also utilize a single condensing unit to refrigerate both sleeves in accordance with the system described in our co-pending application Serial No. 583,925, filed March 21, 1945, now Patent No. 2,462,240, granted Feb. 22, 1949, on a two temperature refrigerator system, in which case the warmer sleeve is controlled as to humidity exactly as described above.

Certain variations may be made in the design described above, as the use of a variable restrictoi` instead of the fixed restrictor between Ithe space cooling and the ice freezing evaporators. Or the opening between the lower food shelf and l the outer walls may be varied in area by means such as dampers to permit the User t0 obtain variations in humidity. We may also place the'ice freezingl shelf at the side or top of the food storage compartment, with an enclosure limiting or preventing cold air leaving the ice freezing compartment but maintaining the free movement of water vapor. Such variations are within the scope of this patent application.

We claim:

1. In a domestic refrigerator having two storage chambers thermally insulated from each other and from the outside, a single work chamber, two in dependent refrigerant condensing units in said work chamber, common means for maintaining a cooling circulation of air past both said condensing units, an evaporator eifective in each storage chamber, two independent refrigerant circuits each including one of said evaporators and one of said condensing units, and an ice freezing evaporator, in one of said storage compartments, in series with ,one of said first mentioned evaporators.V

2. In a refrigerator including a cabinet having two storage chambers thermally insulated from each other and from the outside, a single work chamber, two independent refrigerant condensing units in said work chamber. common means for maintaining a cooling circulation of air past both said condensing units, an evaporator effective in each storage chamber, two independent refrigerant circuits each including one of said evaporators and one of said condensing units, and

an ice freezing evaporator, in one of said storage compartments, in series with the evaporator of the same storage compartment.

3. In a refrigerator including a cabinet having two storage chambers thermally insulated from each other and from the outside, a single work chamber, two independent refrigerant condensing units in said work chamber, common means for maintaining a cooling circulation of air past both said condensing units, an evaporator effective in each storage chamber, two independent refrigerant circuits each including one of said evaporators and one of said condensing units, an ice freezing evaporator near the bottom of one of said storage chambers, in series with the evaporator of that chamber, and insulating partition means, in said storage chamber, above said ice freezing evaporator, adapted to define anice compartment and a food storage compartment within that chamber, there being communication between the twoV compartments .thus formed, adapted to provide water vapor transfer without air transfer between the compartments.

4. In a refrigerator having two storage chambersv thermally insulated from'each other and from the outside, a single work chamber, two independent Vrefrigerant condensing units in said work chamber, commonmeans for maintaining a cooling circulation of air past both said condensing units, an evaporator effective in each storage chamber, two independent refrigerant circuits each including one of said evaporators and one of said condensing units, an ice freezing evaporator near the bottom of one of said storage chambers, in series with one of said first mentioned evaporators, insulating partition means, in Y inside surface of said compartment, anice cube shelf within the compartment, an evaporator for said shelf, in series with and following said rst mentioned evaporator, a restrictor between said evaporators, adapted to reduce the pressure Aand temperature of the ice cube evaporator below the pressure and temperature of the first mentioned evaporator, and an insulating partition defining an ice cube'shelf zone within the compartment but adapted to permit communication' between that zone and the compartment, and means for controllingrsaid communication. v

6. In a domestic refrigerator system, a food storage compartment, an evaporator adapted to cool the upper inside surface of said Vcompartment, an ice cube shelf located near the bottom of the compartment, an evaporator for 'said shelf,

in series with and following Vsaid rst mentioned evaporator, a restrictor between said evaporators, adapted to reduce the pressure and temperature of the ice cube evaporatorbelow the pressure and temperature of the first mentioned evaporator, means for delivering liquid refrigerant to the first evaporator and for withdrawing the evaporated refrigerant from the ice cube evaporator, anda partition located above the ice cube shelf and extending toward but spaced from the walls of the compartment, said partition having one or more gapsadapted to permit water vapor flow from the space above to the space below said partition.

7. In a domestic refrigerator system, a food storage compartment, 'an` evaporator adapted to cool the upper inside surface of said compartment, an ice cube shelf located near the bottom of the compartment, an evaporator for said shelf, in series with and following said rst mentioned evaporator, a restrictor between said evaporators, adapted to reducerth'e pressure and temperature of the ice cube evaporator below the pressure and temperature of the first mentioned evaporator, means for delivering liquid refrigerant to the first evaporator and for withdrawing evaporated refrigerant from the ice cube evaporator, a partition located above the ice cube shelf and extending toward but spaced from the walls of the compartment, said partition having one-or more gaps adapted to permit Water vaporV ow from the space above to the space below said partition, and

means for varying the eiiective cross sectional area of said gaps.

8. In a domestic refrigerator system, a food storage compartment having a liner of heat conductive materiaLran evaporator constructed and arranged to cool the upper walls of said liner, a shelf adapted to receive ice cube trays, located adjacent the bottom of said compartment, an

evaporator arranged to cool said shelf, means for REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record the file of this patent: Y.

STATES PATENTS vNumber Name Date 2,102,354 Chambers Dec. 14, 1937 2,133,958 Kalischer Oct. 25, 1938 2,196,527 Hainsworth Apr. 9, 1940 2,215,372 Howeth Sept. 17, 1940 Y V2,242,407 VTobey May 20, 1941 `2,292,015 Schweller Aug. 4, 1942 Schweller May 18, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2102354 *May 16, 1933Dec 14, 1937Gen Motors CorpRefrigeration
US2133958 *Jan 21, 1937Oct 25, 1938Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoHumidity control for refrigerators
US2196527 *Nov 15, 1934Apr 9, 1940Servel IncRefrigeration
US2215372 *Jun 3, 1938Sep 17, 1940 Refrigerating apparatus
US2242407 *Oct 19, 1939May 20, 1941Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoRefrigeration apparatus
US2292015 *Sep 26, 1940Aug 4, 1942Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus
US2319522 *May 25, 1940May 18, 1943Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2603071 *Jul 7, 1950Jul 15, 1952Kalhoefer Thelma EPortable electric refrigerator
US2613509 *Sep 22, 1948Oct 14, 1952Nash Kelvinator CorpRefrigerating apparatus
US2618936 *Feb 9, 1949Nov 25, 1952Kennedy WalterCombination quick freeze and refrigerator cabinet
US2721454 *May 28, 1952Oct 25, 1955Levey Constance DannenbaumDual compartment refrigerator with independent refrigerant liquefying means
US2844945 *Sep 19, 1951Jul 29, 1958Muffly GlennReversible refrigerating systems
US2927441 *Jan 16, 1956Mar 8, 1960Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus with means preventing condensate on transparent panels
US3009336 *Sep 4, 1956Nov 21, 1961Bayston John RIce making machine
US3049892 *Nov 3, 1959Aug 21, 1962Glenn MufflyDefrosting of evaporator
US4976116 *Jun 23, 1989Dec 11, 1990Nihon Medix Co., Ltd.Cold-air generating device
US5375432 *Dec 30, 1993Dec 27, 1994Whirlpool CorporationIcemaker in refrigerator compartment of refrigerator freezer
US6672092 *Oct 8, 2002Jan 6, 2004Stainless, Inc.Countertop merchandiser unit with refrigerated and heated compartments and method thereof
US7284390May 18, 2005Oct 23, 2007Whirlpool CorporationRefrigerator with intermediate temperature icemaking compartment
US7287397Jun 29, 2006Oct 30, 2007Whirlpool CorporationRefrigerator with modular water tank assembly
US7337620May 27, 2005Mar 4, 2008Whirlpool CorporationInsulated ice compartment for bottom mount refrigerator
US7392665Apr 24, 2007Jul 1, 2008Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator with icemaker
US7428820Feb 13, 2008Sep 30, 2008Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7430873Feb 13, 2008Oct 7, 2008Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7458229Jul 13, 2007Dec 2, 2008Maytag CorporationRefrigerator with intermediate temperature icemaking compartment
US7484382Mar 26, 2004Feb 3, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7490474May 6, 2008Feb 17, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7490475May 6, 2008Feb 17, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7520138May 22, 2008Apr 21, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7520139May 22, 2008Apr 21, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7549297Jan 13, 2006Jun 23, 2009Maytag CorporationRefrigerator air control damper for ice compartment
US7552594Jun 29, 2006Jun 30, 2009Maytag CorporationRefrigerator ice maker with improved air impingement
US7552597May 22, 2008Jun 30, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7568354Jun 29, 2006Aug 4, 2009Maytag CorporationRefrigerator with improved water fill tube for ice maker
US7568357Jan 11, 2006Aug 4, 2009Maytag CorporationFreeze tolerant waterline valve for a refrigerator
US7568359Jun 2, 2006Aug 4, 2009Maytag CorporationInsulated ice compartment for bottom mount refrigerator with controlled heater
US7591141Jan 13, 2006Sep 22, 2009Maytag CorporationElectronic control system for insulated ice compartment for bottom mount refrigerator
US7594413Jun 2, 2006Sep 29, 2009Maytag CorporationRefrigerator ice compartment latch
US7607312Jun 2, 2006Oct 27, 2009Maytag CorporationInsulated ice compartment for bottom mount refrigerator with temperature control system
US7624591May 22, 2008Dec 1, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7631514May 8, 2008Dec 15, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7637119May 8, 2008Dec 29, 2009Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7654105Jun 5, 2008Feb 2, 2010Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator with icemaker
US7673470May 22, 2008Mar 9, 2010Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7677055May 22, 2008Mar 16, 2010Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7681406Jan 13, 2006Mar 23, 2010Electrolux Home Products, Inc.Ice-making system for refrigeration appliance
US7703298Apr 16, 2008Apr 27, 2010Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator with icemaker
US7726148Jan 13, 2006Jun 1, 2010Maytag CorporationRefrigerator ice compartment seal
US7762098May 22, 2008Jul 27, 2010Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US7900465Jun 2, 2006Mar 8, 2011Maytag CorporationInsulated ice compartment for bottom mount refrigerator with controlled damper
US8146379Jan 30, 2009Apr 3, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US8408016Apr 27, 2010Apr 2, 2013Electrolux Home Products, Inc.Ice maker with rotating ice mold and counter-rotating ejection assembly
US8601830Apr 23, 2010Dec 10, 2013Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator with icemaker
US8695370Jun 2, 2006Apr 15, 2014Whirlpool CorporationRefrigerator ice compartment with intermediate temperature
US8707728Jan 20, 2011Apr 29, 2014Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator with icemaker
US8794026Apr 18, 2008Aug 5, 2014Whirlpool CorporationSecondary cooling apparatus and method for a refrigerator
US20120060545 *Dec 2, 2010Mar 15, 2012General Electric CompanyCondenser assembly for multiple refrigeration systems
US20120067075 *Sep 13, 2011Mar 22, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US20120085107 *Dec 19, 2011Apr 12, 2012Titan, Inc.Heat transfer processes and equipment for industrial applications
DE949664C *Oct 21, 1953Sep 27, 1956Faere Armaturfabrik AbKuehlapparat, der aus mindestens einem Kuehlschrank und mindestens einem Gefrierkasten besteht
EP0028559A2 *Oct 24, 1980May 13, 1981Selnor Societe D'electromenager Du NordPartition device with movable panels for cooling apparatus, and refrigerator comprising such a device
EP0192526A1 *Jan 28, 1986Aug 27, 1986Societe D'electromenager Du Nord SelnorRefrigerating cabinet with three compartments
WO1993003316A1 *Aug 8, 1991Feb 18, 1993Peter RohnerWarm section for a refrigerator
WO2003060395A1 *Jan 13, 2003Jul 24, 2003Eurochiller S R LContinuous automatic control system of industrial processes' cooling fluid
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/335, 62/442, 62/229, 62/452, 62/408, 62/526, 62/510, 62/451, 62/443
International ClassificationF25D23/00, F25D11/02, F25B1/00, F25D17/04
Cooperative ClassificationF25B1/00, F25D23/003, F25D2400/14, F25C2400/10, F25D2317/04131, F25D17/042, F25D11/022, F25D2400/04
European ClassificationF25B1/00, F25D11/02B, F25D17/04A, F25D23/00B