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Publication numberUS2495636 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1950
Filing dateFeb 10, 1945
Priority dateMay 22, 1944
Publication numberUS 2495636 A, US 2495636A, US-A-2495636, US2495636 A, US2495636A
InventorsHoeltzel Orval R, Larson John W, Saville William S
Original AssigneeCons Vultee Aircraft Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulating pad
US 2495636 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jang 24, 1950 o. R. HoELTzEl. ETAL 2,495,536

INSULATING PAD Original Filed May 22, 1944 Patented Jan. 24, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE INSULATING PAD Orval R. lioeltzel, William S. Saville, and John W. Larson, Fort Worth, Tex., assignors to Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation, San Diego, Calif., a. corporation of Delaware Original application May 22, 1944, Serial No. 536,768. Divided and this application February l0, 1945. Serial No. 577,274

3 Claims. (Cl. 154-40 -installation in aircraft. can be handled with fa# cillty during installation or removal, and is light in weight.

Another object of the invention is to provide an insulating and sound-proofing pad which comprises a mat of fiber and a tough protective film for one face of the pad for making this area impervious to moisture and air.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pad which includes a bat or mat of fibrous material and a protective film integrallzed with the ber of the mat and which does not substantially add to the overall weight of the pad.

Other objects of the invention will appear from the detailed description.

The'invention. consists in the several novel features hereinafter set forth and more particularly dened by claims at the conclusion hereof.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective of a pad embodying the invention.

Fig. 2 is a transverse section taken on line 2--2 of Fig. 1.

The invention is exemplified in a pad which comprises a layer or mat 8 of loosely matted suitable fibrous material, such for example as fiberglass; a fiexible film or septum 9 of plastic material which is directly integralized with or bonded to the fibers in one face of the fibrous material; and a finishing face Ill of suitable fabric. The fabric facing I0 consists of a sheet which is folded around the margins of the mat as at I3, and to overlie as at I4 the outer face of the lm, and secured together by a seam II which extends through the face covering portion and enfolded margin of the fabric and the integralized mat and film. Sockets I2 of stud and snap fasteners are secured in the corner of the pad and are adapted to be connected to matting studs (not shown) which are secured in the wall which is to be covered by pads. The pads may be formed of any suitable contour and size to form sections which completely cover the wall or a section thereof. The pad is placed with the lm 9 next to the Wall and is impervious to moisture and sound. The fabric forms a finished wall surface when the p 2 pads are secured in multiple on the wall and adjacent to each other.

The film or septum 9 consists of a exible and soluble plastic material such as a rubber hydrohalide such as rubber hydrochloride. The film is bonded to the fiber-glass while it has been softened to a semi-fluid condition by a suitable solvent to render it adhesive so it will bond to and embrace fibers to which it is applied when the solvent is evaporated and the film is dried and set or hardened and becomes integralized with the fibers.

' fibers of the mat.

The film is integralized with the matted layer cf fiber-glass by softening the film with a suitable solvent such as methyl-ethylketone, to render it adhesive, subjecting the softened film and matted layer to heat to accelerate the action of the solvent, and to pressure and vacuum to force the film into close contact with the fibers and then subjected to heat to dry and set the lm on the fibers as set forth in our application filed May 22, 1944, Serial No. 536,768, of which the present application is a division. During this bonding the film is bonded to and integralized with the 'I'he surface of the film becomes wrinkled or wavy which results from its stretching while it is soft and during .its integralzation with the fibrous mat.

A sheet of the textile fabric I0 is then cut to the shape of the pad desired with a projecting marginal portion for a fold around the edges of the integralized film and fibrous material. The

sheet of fabric is then placed over the bare iace of fibrous material and its marginal portion I4 is folded around the edges of the combined sheet of fil-m and layer of fibers. The portion I4 and the marginal portion of the face-portion of the fabric Il) with the integralized ,film and fibrous material between them are stitched together by the seam II. The folded edge of the fabric, outwardly of the fibrous material, may also be stitched together by a seam 2l. The sockets I2 for the stud fasteners, in desired number, are then secured to the corners or other portions of the mat so the pad can be initially and readily attached to the matting studs secured in the wall structure of the aircraft, and so that the pad will be held against said structure. The pads are secured on the wall in edge to edge relation to cover the wall or portion thereof which required insulation. f

The invention exemplifies an insulating pad which comprises matted fibrous material, preferably ber-glass, and a flexible lm of plastic material which forms a protective covering which 3 is integralized with the matted fibrous material. The pad is light in weight. is an efficient sound and moisture insulation and is provided with a finishing face of insulation on the walls. The flexibility of the pads adapts it to conform to walls of different contour on which it is installed.

The invention provides an insulating and sound-proofing pad which comprises a. mat of fiber and a tough protective film for one face of the pad for making this face withstand rough handling and retain a high fatigue value over a substantial cycle in installation and removal of the pad.

'I'he invention is not to be understood as restricted to the details set forth since these may be modified within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Having thus described the invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A unit comprising a layer of loosely matted mass of fibrous material, a, substantially impervious, preformed film of thermoplastic synthetic resin materialintegralized with the fibers in one face of the loosely matted material, a fabric covering the other face of said loosely matted layer and enfolded and secured around the edges of the mass and the film, the mass, film, and fabric being in the form of a soundproof, flexible pad adapted to cover and sound-proof a, section of a Wall, and means for readily and demountably securing the pad on the wall. f

2. A unit comprising a layer o f loosely matted mass of glass fibers, a substantially impervious, preformed film of thermoplastic material integralized with the fibers in one face of the loosely matted material, a fabric covering the other face of said loosely matted mass and enfolded and secured around the edges of the mass and the film,

4 the mass. film. and fabric being in the form of a sound-proof, flexible pad adapted to cover and sound-proof a section of a wall. and means for readily and demountably securing the pad on the wall.

3. A unit comprising a layer of loosely matted mass of glass fibers, a substantially impervious, preformed nlm of rubber hydrohalide integrallzed with the fibers in one face of the loosely matted material, a fabric covering the other face of said loosely matted mass and enfolded around the edges of the mass and the film, the mass, film and fabric being formed into a sound-proof, flexible pad adapted to cover and sound-proof a section of a wall, and means for readily and demountably securing the pad on the wall.

ORVAL R. HOELTZEL. WILLIAM S. SAVILLE. JOHN W. LARSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the ille of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,484,056 Birtch Feb. 19, 1924 2,086,433 Prudden July 6, 1937 2,108,682 Leslie Feb. 15, 1938 2,215,061 Alt Sept. 17, 1940 2,249,275 Hanley July 15, 1941 2,252,157 Bergin Aug. 12, 1941 2,273,452 Snyder Feb. 17, 1942 2,355,608 Stieger Aug. 15, 1944 2,381,542 Hyatt et al Aug. 7, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 482,809 Great Britain Apr. 5, 1938 527,570 Great Britain Oct. 11, 1940

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2610757 *Feb 10, 1947Sep 16, 1952Plastic Sheet Fabrication IncInsulated container
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US3092529 *Jul 1, 1955Jun 4, 1963Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpDuct or conduit blank
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US6645597 *Jun 20, 2002Nov 11, 2003Michael R. SwainContainment mat
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/404.1, 156/93, 181/284, 428/81, 156/92, 52/794.1, 428/74, 52/511, 156/216
International ClassificationE04B1/84, E04B1/74, E04B1/88, E04C2/24, E04C2/10
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/88, E04C2/246, E04B2001/8461
European ClassificationE04B1/88, E04C2/24C