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Publication numberUS2496609 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 7, 1950
Filing dateJul 19, 1944
Priority dateJul 19, 1944
Publication numberUS 2496609 A, US 2496609A, US-A-2496609, US2496609 A, US2496609A
InventorsMartin Van Antwerpen
Original AssigneeMartin Van Antwerpen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination presser and sealer
US 2496609 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 7, 1950 M. vAN ANTWERPEN 2,496,609

COMBINATION PREssER AND SEALER Filed July 19, 1944 4 sheets-sheet 1 lNvENToR l MARHN vAN ANTWERPEN Feb. 7, 1950 M. VAN ANTWERPEN 2,496,509-

COMBINATION PREssER AND sEALER Filed July 19, 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 li il f M 25, "l Z3 l! l! m /A n q n 77 "212/ zo x 1' 2/ ZZA/f' /0 INVENTOR MARTIN VAN ANTWERPEN AT TOR NEYS Feb. 7, 1950 M. vAN ANTWERPEN COMBINATION PREssER AND sEALER Filed July 19, 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 I* INVENTOR MARTIN VAN ANTWERPEN AT TOR NEYS Feb. 7, 1950 M. vAN ANTWERPEN 2,496,609

COMBINATION PRESSER AND SEALER Filed July 19, 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR MARTIN VAN ANTWERPEN 'ATTORNEYS Patented Feb. 7, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE comma'rron :rsi-gsm AND sEALnn Martin Van Antwerpen, Milwaukee, Wis. Application July 19, 1944, Serial No. 545,723

(ci. 22e-56) 8 Claims. l

This invention appertalns to packaging and more particularly to a novel machine for compressing and effectively sealing cellophane packages.

One of the primary objects of my invention is to provide a machine for packaging goods, which is so constructed as to initially compress the goods and expel air therefrom and thereafter seal the package against the admittance of air whereby the goods will be protected from outside atmospheric conditions.

Another salient object of my invention is to provide a machine which will compress a cellophane package and thereafter seal the package by heat and en, f

A further object of my invention is to provide a machine which will initially expel excess air from the goods and the package; second. seal the package by electrically heated dies, and third continue to compress the package and hold the package against movement during the sealing operation.

A further important object of my invention is to provide novel means for resiliently mounting one of the sealing dies relative to the other, whereby the self-centering and mating of the dies is insured and whereby undue pressure on the dies will be eliminated to prevent tearing and inJuring of the package.

Another important object of my invention is to provide a machine, which in one of its embodiments, entirely automatic in its operation for carrying the packages to the sealing and compressing table for compressing and sealing the package for finally carrying the sealed and compressed package to an unloading station.

A still further object of my invention is to provide means for locating and centering the package on the compressing table. so that the package will always be in correct position for compressing and sealing.

A still further important object of my invention is to provide novel means for arranging the seal- -ing dies on the compressing table above the active surface of the table, whereby upon the placing of the package on the table, the sealing flaps of the package will be in correct position to be eeotively engaged by said dies.

With these and other oblects in view, the invention consists in the novel construction. arrangement and formation of parts, as will be hereinafter more specincally described, claimed, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which drawings:

Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view through one form ot my novel compressing and package seal- 2 ing machine, the view being taken substantially on the line l-I of Figure 2 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 2 is a top plan view of my machine showing parts thereof broken away and in section to illustrate structural detail.

Figure 3 is a transverse sectional view through the machine taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 1 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line 4 4 of Figure 1 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 5 is an enlarged fragmentary detailed sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 2 looking in the direction of the arrows illustrating my novel sealing dies and the movement of the presser boardrelative to the sealing dies.

Figure 6 is a longitudinal sectional view through another form of my invention, said form illustrating one embodiment of an automatic machine, the view itself being taken on the line 8-8 of Figure 'l looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure '7 is a top plan view of my automatic machine, parts thereof being shown broken away and in sections.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view taken substantially on the line 8-8 of Figure 6 looking in the direction of the'arrows and showing the novel means employed for operating the presser table and board.

Figure 9 is an end elevational view of my automatic machine with parts thereof broken away and in sections and illustrating one simple form of drive.

Referring to the drawings in detail, wherein similar reference characters designate correspending. parts through the several views the letter M generally indicates a form of my manuallv operated machine.

The machine M includes a presser table Il which can be ilrmly secured to any desired type of supporting base l l. The base, by way of example. is shown to include corner legs or standards l2 connected together by suitable top braces I3 and bottom braces Il.

Arranged above the presser table I0 for cooperation therewith is a presser board l5. This presser board is mounted for swinging movement at its rear end on bearing pins I8 carried by bearing brackets I 1. The bearing brackets l1 in turn can be rigidly fastened to the frame or base l I of my machine.

The presser board I5 is movable toward `the table I0 for compressing a package between the table and itself by means of a foot-operated aisance mechanism I8. This mechanism Il includes a swinging frame embodying side levers I9 rigidly connected together by a cooperating strap 20. The rear ends of the levers I9 are pivctally connected as at 2| to the rear legs of the base frame. The levers i9 extendforwardly of the front of the base frame and are connected by a foot board or treadle 22. Side links 23 connect the levers i9 with the presser board l5 and as clearly shown in Figure 1 of the drawings these links are pivotally connected both to the levers i9 and tothe presser board. Contractile coil springs 23 connect the cross strap 20 with the top of the base frame H and function to normally hold the treadle and the presser board l5 in a raised position. Consequently, a package can be readily introduced between the table I and the presser board.

The package is adapted to be sealed by mating upper and lower sealing dies 24 and 25. These dies extend transversely across the machine and are electrically heated. As is clearly shown in Figures 1, 2 and 5, electric heating elements 26 are arranged directly in said dies. Current for the electric heating elements can be supplied from any desired source and it is also preferred to provide at least one of the dies with an electric cutout switch 2l whereby to automatically open the circuit to the dies when the dies reach a predetermined temperature.

I lay great stress on these dies and the lower die 25 includes a plurality of equldistantly spaced ribs 28. The upper die 255 also includes a plurality of equidistantly spaced ribs 2s and the ribs of both dies extend the full length thereof and the ribs of one die are adapted to fit in the.

spaces between the ribs of the other die when the presser board is in its lowered position. These ribs form an eiilcient and particular type of sealing which will be later described in detail.

Particular attention is now invited to the novel means of arranging the dies on the presser table and the presser board. The lower sealing die 25 is secured to a transversely extending strip or filler block 30 which is rigidly secured to the upper surface of the table IU at the front edge thereof. It thus can be seen that the lower die.

25 is arranged a considerable distance above the active face of the presser table.

The upper die 24 is rigidly secured to a carrier board 3l which is disposed in front of the presser table I5. This board 3| has rigidly fastened 'thereto spaced straps 32 which extend rearwardly over the top of the presser board I 5. The board 3| carrying the upper die is resiliently carried by the presser board i and as shown the presser board has secured thereto bolts 33 which extend through slots 34 formed in the straps 82. Expansion springs 35 are coiled about the bolts and engage the straps and the bolt heads 35.l Consequently, -under normal conditions the straps are held against the upper surface of the presser board l5 and the carrier board 3| is held in parallel relation to the presser board.

To facilitate the accurate placing of a package on the presser table a guide strip 3'! is secured to the upper face of the tableat the rear end thereof and this guide strip acts as a stop for the package.

In packaging parcels of a certain type, it is essential that excess air be expelled therefrom and that the package be sealed against outside atmospheric conditions. A cellophane bag B is preferably utilized and this bag is open'at one end through which the article to be packaged is placed. The bag B, hence includes the usual body 38 having sealing aps 39.

As heretofore stated, the problem to. be solved is nrst to compress the package to compact size and to then tightly seal the package. vThis is accomplished by my nevelmachine M and in use thereof the package witl. the article thereinis.,

slid on the table I8 until the rear `edge thereof strikes the guide strip 3l. .At this time the sealing naps 38 will be positioned between the seall. ing dies 24 and 25. The operator now steps on the treadle 22 which will forcibly lower the presser board I5 and bring the heated dies into mating relation. This will form a series of spaced corrugations in the sealing flaps and the heat will eectively unite these flaps. The corrugations extend crosswise of the bag and the corrugations are indicated by the reference character Sil (see Figure 5). In eiect the oorrugations dene spaced sealing ribs and the. spaces between the ribs which are not tightly sealed define air spaces which efficiently function to seal the package from outside atmosphere.

While I lay particular stress on this novel type of seal, nevertheless, I do not wish to limit myself to this exact form of sealing in that with some types of heavy material it might be advisable to seal the bags formed from such material by means of serrations which extend along the aps longitudinally of the package.

By having my die 2d resiliently mounted the same has limited movement relative to the die 25 and this permits the die 2li to center and locate itself relative to the lower die whereby the mating of the dies is insured. Likewise, where the operator places undue force on the treadle 22 the presser board can continue in its movement leaving the die 2d properly placed on the die 25 without injuring the bag material.

I also lay great stress on the fact that the package is compressed from the rear toward the front and hence the article in the package has the air gradually forced out therefrom from the rear toward the front.

As soon as the operator releases pressure from the treadle 22, the spring 23' functions to raise the presser board i5 and the operator can immediately remove the package from the machine and the machine is instantly ready for the reception of a new package.

In large plants it might be advisable to provide an automatic machine so as to speed up the package. Such a machine is shown in Figures 6 to 9, inclusive, and the same includes a longitudinally extending base plate l5 which can be mounted on any preferred type of frame. Mounted adjacent to the opposite ends of the base plate 45 are pairs of bearing standards 46 and Il. These standards rotatably carry, in suitable bearings, rollers d8 over which travels an endless conveyor belt 49. 'Ihe conveyor belt can be formed from any preferred material and has formed on its rear longitudinal edge an outstanding guide and stop rib 55. At spaced points the outer surface of the belts is also provided with transversely extending ribs 5i and these ribs dene accuratelyfsized pockets or compartments for receiving the bags with the articles to be sealed therein. The bearing standards 46 can be provided with any preferred type of means for adjusting the roller 48 so that vany slack in the belt can be taken up. The roller 48 carried by the bearing standards 41 can have its shaft provided with a spur gear 52 and this spur gear meshes with a sector gear 53. The sector gear 53 is of a considerably greater diameter than the gear 52 and the gear I is directly keyed to the armature shaft 54 of an electric motor 54'. The electric motor 54 is of the desired horsepower and can be carried by the base plate 45. It is to be noted that the amature shaft 54 extends beyond both ends of the motor, and the shaft is preferably Journaled in suitable bearings carried by the standards 4l. By using a sector gear 53 I can impart a step by step movement to the endless conveyor belt 50, and hence the belt travels a predetermined distance (the distance of the width of a package) and then is brought to a stop for a predetermined length of time. During the stop period of the belt, packages can` be placed on and off the belt and a package can be compressed and sealed The means for compressing and sealing the package is located equidistant between the ends of the belt and includes a supporting framework 55 which can be securely bolted or otherwise fastened to the base 45. The framework 55 includes upright side frame plates 56 which extend up from the base plate in rear of the belt. Journaled in these frame plates 56 for rotary movement is a driven shaft 57. The shaft 51 is driven in proper timed relation to the conveyor belt and is also operated from the armature shaft 5t. An upright counter shaft 58 is carried for rotation by suitable bearings which can be supported on a post 59 carried by the base plate 55. The shaft 58 is operatively connected to the armature shaft 56 by beveled gears 50 and similar beveled gears 5i are utilized for operatively connecting the shaft 58 with the driven shaft 5l.

Extending under the upper run of the .endless conveyor belt 19 is the swinging presser table 52 and extending over the upper run is the swinging presser board 53. The table and the board at their rear ends are pivotally connected, as at @Il and 65 to the side frame plates 55.

The front ends of the presser table B2 and the presser board 53 extend beyond the front edge of the upper run of the endless conveyor belt 50, and these forward ends carry the sealing dies 66 and 'l. In view of the fact that the packages travel laterally of the presser table, it is desirable and essential to have the sealing dies 6B and 51 out of the path of the movement of the bags so that the bags will not be injured bythe heat from said dies in any way until the sealing operation.

VAttention is called to the fact that the sealing dies 65 and 61 are of the same as the sealing dies shown in the first form of my invention and the die 56 is mounted upon a. spacer block 68 while the die 6l is carried by arms 63 which are resiliently mounted. These arms are loosely mounted upon bolts 10 and coil springs 'li normally urge the arms into contact with the presser board 63.

Movement of the presser board and table toward one another can be accomplished in various manners and for the purpose of illustration, I have shown upper and lower swinging levers I2 and 13 for actuating these members. These levers 'l2 and 13 are rockably mounted upon pivot pins 'I4 and 'l5 carried by the side frame plates 55 and these levers extend forwardly and rearwardly from said frame plates. The forward ends of the levers 12 and 'I3 are operatively connected to the presser table 62 and the presser board 53 by links 'I6 and 11. The rear ends of the levers beyond the pivot pins 14 and 'l5 engage respectively with cams 'I8 and 19, and these cams are keyed or otherwise rigidly fastened to the driven y 8 shaft 51.. The cams are so disposed that during the rotation of the shaft 51, that when the high points thereof engage the levers, the levelswill be rocked for forcibly bringing the presser table and presser board toward one another.

In operation of this form of my invention and considering that the machine is momentarily atrest; i. e. the smooth part of the sector gear 53 is riding past the gear 52 and the high points of the cams are riding on the levers: the operator places a package with the goods therein upon the conveyor belt at the right-hand side of the machine. Upon continued movement of the motor 54', the teeth oi' the'sector gear will engage the gear 52 and the belt will start in operation, and the upper run thereof will move toward the left. Synchronous with this operation the low points of the cams will ride on the levers and the presser table and the presser board will move away from the belt allowing the package to ride between the table andthe presser board. When the package is disposed between the table and the board, the teeth of the sector gear will be out of mesh with the gear 52, and consequently, the belt will again be at rest. The high points of the cams will now engage the levers and the table and board will be brought toward one another into pressing position and the package will be compressed and excess air will be forced therefrom. Upon continued movement of the table and board toward one another the sealing dies 66 and 61 will engage the flaps of the package and effectively heat seal the same. Immediately upon completion of the sealing step, the cams will again permit the movement of the table and board away from one another and the teeth of the sector gear will engage the teeth of the gear 52, and the belt will again start its movement. The belt will carry the completely sealed package to the right and will bring in another package to be sealed between the table and the presser board. The completed package can now be removed from the belt. The operation of the machine is continuous and obviously packages can be quickly and efficiently` sealed.

As is clearly shown in Figure 8 of the drawings. the inner ends of the levers 12 and 13 can be connected together by a contractile coil spring 8U which functions to normally hold the levers toward their cams and the presser table and the presser board in an open package receiving position.

While I have shown the presser table and the presser board arranged on horizontal pivots so l that the feed table and board will move toward a horizontal position, it is to be understood that the table and board can be in the nature of jaws and can be set in a substantial vertical position.

Changes in details may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of my invention, but what I claim as new is:

1. In a machine for simultaneously compressing packages and sealing the open flaps thereof, a presser table, a presser board, means hingedly mounting the presser board at its rear and above the table for movement toward and away from the table, means normally holding the presser board away from the table whereby a package can be placed between the table and the board, and sealing dies carried by the forward ends of the table and presser board for engaging on opposite sides of the naps of the package when the board is in its lowered compressing position, and

means for'swinging said board toward the table,

whereby the package will be compressed from the rear toward the open naps and means for resilientLv mounting one of said dies.

2. In a machine ior compressing and sealing packages, a presser table, a presser board, means hingedLv mounting the presser board at its rear and above the table ier movement toward and away from the table, means normally holding the presser board away from the table whereby a package can be placed between the table and the board, and sealing dies carried by the forward ends of the table and presser board for engaging on opposite sides of the naps of the package when the board` is in its lowered compressing position. and means for moving said board toward the table, and means resiliently mounting one of the dies on the presser board, whereby said board and die will have limited movement relative to one another.

3. A machine for compressing and sealing packages comprising an endless conveyor for the packages, a presser table disposed under the upper run of the conveyor, a presser board rockably mounted above the upper run of the conveyor and over said conveyor, means for advancing the conveyor in a step by step movement between the table and the presser board, means for bringing the presser board toward the table and conveyor while the conveyor is at rest, and heat sealing dies carried by the table and presser board arranged in iront of the conveyor.

4. A machine for compressing and sealing packages comprising an endless conveyor for the packages, a presser table disposed under the upper run of the conveyor, a presser board rockably mounted above the upper run of the conveyor and over said conveyor, means for advancing the conveyor in a step by step movement between the table and the presser board, means for bringing the presser board toward the table and conveyor while the conveyor is at rest, and heat sealing dies carried by the table and presser board arranged in front of the conveyor, and a guide rib for packages extending longitudinally of the belt and adjacent to the rear edge thereof.

5. A machine for compressing and sealing packages comprising an endless conveyor for the packages, a presser table disposed under the upper run of the conveyor, a presser board rockably mounted above the upper run of the conveyor and over said conveyor, means for advancing the conveyor in a step by step movement between the table and the presser board, means for bringing the presser board towardthe table and conveyor while the conveyor is at rest, and heat sealing dies carried by the table and presser board arranged in front of the conveyor, and transversely extending ribs on the outer vface of said belt dening package receiving compartments.

. 6. A machine for compressing and sealing packages comprising an endless conveyor for the packages, a presser table disposed under the upper run of the conveyor, a presser board rockably mounted above the upper run of the conveyor and over said conveyor,` means for advancing the vconveyor in a step by step movement between the table and the presser board, means for bringing the presser board toward the table and conveyor while the conveyor is at rest, and heat sealing dies carried by the table and presser board arranged in front of the conveyor, transversely extending ribs on the outer face of said .belt dening package receiving compartments,

and a longitudinally extending guide rib on said belt connecting said transverse ribs.

7. In a machine for compressing and sealing packages, an endless conveyor belt, a presser table hingedly mounted in its rear end disposed under the upper run of said conveyor, a presser board rockably mounted at its rear end extending over the upper run of the conveyor, package flap sealing means carried by the table andV presser board, spring means normally holding the table and presser board away from one another, means for operating the belt in a step by step movement past the table, and means operating in timed conjunction with the conveyor for bringing the table and board toward one another intol compressing position when the conveyor is at rest, said means including a constantly driven shaft, pairs of cams on said shaft, pairs of levers rockably mounted intermediate their ends, links operatively connecting the forward ends of the pairs of arms to the table and presser board, the rear ends of said levers engaging the cams.

8. In a machine for compressing and sealing packages, a presser table, a presser board rockably mounted above the table, means normallyA MARTIN VAN ANTWERPEN.

REFERENCES Cii'liED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

- UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 225,940 McCrodden Mar. 30, 1880 803,017 Palmer Oct. 31, 1905 2,094,594 Gaubert Oct. 5, 1937 2,102,716 Berch Dec. 21, 1937 2,103,945 Henley Dec. 28, 1937 2,140,117 Salsberg Dec. 13, 1938 2,161,071 McGrath et al June 6, 1939 2,163,047 Malhiot June 20, 1939 2,175,031 Salsberg Oct. 3, 1939 2,339,896 Waters Jan. 25, 1944 2,356,472 Rothaug Aug. 22, 1944

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2559368 *May 12, 1947Jul 3, 1951Pancratz Frank JBag forming and sealing machine
US2610137 *Aug 16, 1948Sep 9, 1952Sears Roebuck & CoElectrothermal bag sealer
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US2641094 *Nov 23, 1948Jun 9, 1953Tenderet Sales CompanyMeat patty forming and sealing machine
US2641304 *Mar 24, 1952Jun 9, 1953Swift & CoSealing machine
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US7140167 *Aug 15, 2003Nov 28, 2006Cargill, IncorporatedPositive pressure fresh meat packaging system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification53/122, 383/94, 53/526, 53/374.2, 53/374.9, 100/233, 156/581
International ClassificationB29C65/18, B65B51/14, B65B1/24
Cooperative ClassificationB65B51/148, B29C66/9672, B29C66/8324, B29C66/80, B29C66/83241, B65B1/24, B29C65/18
European ClassificationB29C65/18, B29C66/80, B65B51/14T, B65B1/24