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Publication numberUS2497870 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 21, 1950
Filing dateJan 22, 1947
Priority dateJan 22, 1947
Publication numberUS 2497870 A, US 2497870A, US-A-2497870, US2497870 A, US2497870A
InventorsDennis Stanley W
Original AssigneeCrown Cork & Seal Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container closure
US 2497870 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 21, 1950 s. w. DENNIS 2,497,870

CONTAINER CLOSURE Filed Jan. 22, 1947 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Feb. 21, 1950 s. w. DENNIS CONTAINER CLOSURE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 22, 1947 I u I a I I I I I I I I I n I gvvuon o'o Stanley wpennis MmQ m Patented Feb. 21, 1950 CONTAINER CLOSURE Stanley W. Dennis, Baltimore,

Md., assignor a Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc., Baltimore,

Md., a corporation oi New York Application January 22, 1947, Serial No. 723,630

Claims.

The present invention relates to closures.

More particularly, the closure of the present invention is an improvement on closures of the type shown, described and claimed in a number of prior patents to G. W. Booth, owned by the assignee of the present application, such as Patents 1,956,209, Reissue 19,422, 1,956,213, 1,956,214, 1,956,215 and 1,956,217. Certain features of the invention, however, as regards cap structures, have utility and may be used in connection with caps of other types, as will be apparent from the following description and the appended claims.

A primary object of the invention is to overcome certain difiiculties which have arisen in connection with the extensive commercial use of closures of the type shown in the above mentioned patents. Although such closures have been highly successful and have gone into wide commercial use, some difliculties have been encountered, particularly in attempts to use them with relatively light weight, thin walled glass containers of the type recently placed on the market for packaging milk and similar products. Closures of the type referred to above are applied under relatively high sealing pressures, to deform the subnew container stantially flat, ductile metal blanks and iron the I marginal portions thereof downwardly in close conformity to the sealing bead adjacent the mouth of the container. With old style milk bottles, of substantial thickness and strength, these high pressures were unobjectionable, and effective seals were provided. However, with containers of the type used by most dairies at the present time, the containers do not have sufficient strength, always to withstand the high capping pressures required with the old style caps, and an excessive amount of breakage has sometimes been encountered.

Hence the present invention aims to provide a cap of the foregoing type which may be employed with the old capping machinery, with minor, if any modifications thereof, and which may be applied to milk bottles and other containers with as little as only one-fifth of the amount of pressure required to apply caps of the old style, referred to above, thereby eliminating the breakage of bottles.

Another object of the invention is to provide a cap of this type, which is partially preformed, in the sense that the top surface and a portion of the side wall or skirt are well defined and drawn or otherwise pressed to shape, prior to the application of the cap to the bottle, thereby eliminating the. necessity of drawing, ironing, or otherwise forming a major portion of the closure skirt from a substantially flat blank, in position on the bottle or other container.

Another object of the invention is to provide 5 preformed closures of this type, in accordance with which the nesting of a plurality of such closures in a stack will be accurately controlled, by the structure of the closure itself, so that the closures will not stick and jam in the closure feeding mechanism, and will be delivered, one by one, to the capping mechanism in an improved manner.

A further object is to provide a preformed closure which may be deposited and centered upon the sealing head of an associated container with greater facility than the substantially fiat disc types previously used, and which will be retained thereon more securely against accidental displacement.

Another object of the invention is to provide structural features in a closure of the type under consideration which materially increase the strength of the closure so that lighter and cheaper metals may be employed in forming the cap.

Another object is to provide a cap structure which facilitates the use of latex and other sealing compositions, deposited in fluid form in the interiors of metal shells, and prevents the sticking together of a plurality of such caps, when stacked.

To these ends, the skirt or side wall of the closure, between the upper and lower ends thereof is provided with a circumferentially continuous outwardly and downwardly projecting shoulder or ofiset portion, performing the dual function of controlling the nesting of a plurality of caps in a stack and increasing the stiffness and strength of the cap.

I A further object of the invention is to provide a partially preformed closure of the type under consideration, in which the skirt is so formed as to facilitate deformation thereof in securing the closure to a bottle, Further, the invention aims to provide a closure having a cap skirt, which,

4 when locked in place on a container, will provide a plurality of regular, evenly spaced, efficient, and neat appearing corrugations or crimps, avoiding the unsightly, irregular, and inefl'icient crimps which would be provided, were not the structure of the present invention employed.

In accordance with certain of the patents identifled above, the marginal portions of the discs were provided with radial score lines, to control the crimping of the cap skirt, when ironed into place around the locking bead and under the shoulder of an associated container. With substantially flat discs of the type described in those patents, that system was entirely satisfactory, but with a partially preformed cap, having a narrow horizontally extending flange of the type provided by the present invention, such score lines do not satisfactorily perform the intended function, since there is insufficient further contraction of the flange, during the flnal ironing or crimping operation, to afford an opportunity for the score lines to control the fiuting or corrugations in the cap skirt as finally applied.

In accordance with the present invention, the horizontally extending flange, at the lower end of the preformed cap skirt is provided with a plurality of corrugations, extending from the line of junction of the flange with the skirt, outwardly to the outer margin of the flange, and these corrugations have special structural features, as explained below, which facilitate the final locking of the closure to the receptacle.

A further object is to provide a cap which may be more readily removed from the associated container than prior caps and without any permanent distortion, and which may be re-applied to the container more readily to provide an improved re-seal. The special form of corrugations or pleats formed at the lower end of the skirt lie under the rounded portion of the locking ring or finish around the mouth of the container, after the cap has been applied thereto by conventional capping machines. When the cap is removed, the surface of the glass finish exerts a camming action on the pleats or corrugations and tends to spread or open them somewhat, but, after the cap has been removed, the corrugations tend to return to the positions to which they were bent during the cap applying operation. In this position, they serve as reinforcing elements for the portion of the cap skirt thereabove and prevent accidental damage or distortion thereof. Moreover, they readily snap back under the locking ring, when the cap is re-applied, by hand,

to the container. The improved re-seal feature of the present invention and the reinforcing function of the corrugations at thelower edge of the cap skirt are important advantages of the new cap.

Other and further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the following description of certain specific embodiments, shown in the accompanying drawings for purposes of illustration, and described below.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a cap in accordance with the invention.

Figure 2 is a side elevation thereof.

Figure 3 is a vertical, axial section of a pair of such caps, in nested relation, in a stack.

Figure 3a is a fragmentary side elevation of the I can skirt on an enlarged scale.

Figure 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary halfsection of the cap of Figures 1, 2 and 3.

Figure 5 is a similar section of a modified form.

Figure 6 is an enlarged top plan view of the flange of the cap.

The cap of the present invention may be made from a laminated sheet, consisting of a metal layer I0 and a paper layer ll adhesively united thereto, as explained in the above mentioned patents. The cap comprises a circular top H, a depending skirt i3; and a horizontally extending flange IA. The skirt l3 includes an upper, gently rounded portion l5 shaped to conform closely to the standard cross-sectional curve of the lockin bead orflnish formed on milk bottles of the type with which the caps of the above identified patents are adapted to be used. The skirt 13 also includes a lower, substantially cylindrical portion I6, connected at its upper end to the upper portion l5 by a downwardly and outwardly inclined shoulder or offset portion I'I, extending continuously, circumferentially around the skirt.

At its lower end, the skirt joins the flange it along a circular circumferentially continuous, non-corrugated line or corner I8, lying in a single plane parallel to the plane of the top I2.

The flange H includes a plurality of horizontal, radially outwardly projecting straight line sections 22, (of a width indicated at 24 in Figures 3a. and 6) extending from the line of junction ll with the cap skirt, outwardly to the outer margin IQ of the flange, and a plurality of intermediate corrugations 23, of a width indicated at 26 in Figures-3a and 6. It should be noted that the corrugations are of progressively increasing depth from their inner ends adjacent the line of junction l8, to their outer ends at the outer margin I9 of the flange, and are also of progressively increasing width from their inner ends to their outer ends. Moreover, the corrugations each project upwardl from the plane of the radial, straight line portion 22 of the cap skirt. A preferred manner in which the straight line radial sections 22 and the intermediate corrugations 23 may be formed is shown, described, and claimed in my copending application Serial No. 12,803, filed March 3, 1948.

The offset portion or shoulder I1, between the upper and lower skirt sections l5 and I6 performs the dual function of increasing the stiffness and strength of the skirt or side wall and controlling the nesting of a plurality of such caps, as indicated in Figure 3. The offset, it may be noted, as indicated by the space 25 (Figure 4), is substantially equal to the thickness of the sheet material of which the cap is made.

The preformed corrugations in the flange I4 control the crimping of the flange, when the latter is forced downwardly beneath the locking shoulder of the associated container, with the result that the crimps are equally spaced, com pletely around the cap and no areas of weakness, which might result from unduly widely spaced crimps, are formed. It will be understood that the line of junction l8 between the flange and the skirt is positioned substantially opposite to the line of maximum diameter of the locking bead on the container, and that the flange I4 is forced under the locking shoulder, during the application of the closure, as explained in the above patents.

The form of closure shown in Figure 5 is similar to the one just described, and differs therefrom primarily in that the cap is made from a single layer of sheet metal 10', instead of from a laminated, composite sheet of metal and paper. Instead of using an overall layer of paper to provide the sealing contact with the bead surrounding the mouth of the container, a ring ll of a latex composition, or other sealing compound, is employed. The sealing material, while in fluid condition, is applied to the interior of the cap, in an annular layer, extending around the downwardly curved portion l5, thereof and terminating short of the circumferential shoulder I'I'.

Caps of this type nest in a stack, in substantially the same manner as shown in Figure 3, with the result that the layer of sealing composition l I in one cap is maintained out of contact with all portions of the cap therebelow, and the caps in the stack have no tendency to stick together while being fed to a capping machine.

It should be understood that the present invention is not limited to the details as to cap structure described above and shown for purposes of illustration in the accompanying drawings, but includes all modifications coming within the scope of the appended claims and theirequivalents.

I claim:

1. A container closure formed from a sheet of ductile material, comprising a substantially flat top having a circular marginal portion merging directly into a downwardly rounded, gently curved upper skirt portion, a lower skirt portion of greater diameter thanthe upper skirt portion, a circumferentially continuous offset shoulder connecting the upper and lower skirt portions and an outwardly extending, corrugated locking flange at the lowerend of the lower skirt portion, the inner diameter of the lower portion being substantially equal to the outer diameter of the upper portion, whereby the nesting of a plu-- rality of closures in a stack is controlled, with the lower edge of the skirt of one closure relatively snugly encircling the upper skirt portion of the closure therebelow and seated upon the shoulder of the latter.

2. A container closure in accordance with claim 1 characterized in that the upper skirt portion, below the downwardly rounded corner, includes a cylindrical section extending downwardly to the shoulder and in that the lower skirt portion below the shoulder includes a cylindrical section of greater height than the first mentioned cylindrical section extending downwardly to the flange.

3. A container closure formed from a sheet of ductile material, comprising a substantially flat top, an upper skirt portion connected directly to the margin thereof by a downwardly rounded corner, a lower skirt portion of greater diameter than, and of a height at least as great as the upper skirt portion, a circumferentially continuous, outwardly projecting, offset shoulder connecting the upper and lower portions, and an outwardly extending flange at the lower end of the latter portion, the inner diameter of the lower portion being substantially equal to the outer diameter of the upper portion, whereby the nest,- ing of a plurality of closures in a stack is controlled, with the lower edge of the skirt of one closure relatively snugly encircling the upper skirt portion of the closure therebelow and seated upon the shoulder of the latter, said flange having a plurality of radially extending corrugations, extending from the outer margin of the flange inwardly only to a circular line of junction with the skirt, said line lying in a single plane parallel to the plane of said flat top.

4. A container closure formed from sheet material, comprising a substantially flat top, a substantially cylindrical upper skirt portion connected directly to the margin thereof by a downwardly rounded gently curved corner, a substantially cylindrical lower skirt portion of greater diameter than, and of a height at least as great as the upper skirt portion, a circumferentially continuous oflset shoulder connecting the upper and lower portions, and an outwardly extending flange at the lower end of the latter portion, said flange having a plurality of circumferentially spaced, horizontally and radially extending straight line sections and a corresponding number of axially deflected sections therebetween, the axially deflected sections being of maximum depth at the outer margin of the flange and of progressively decreasing depth radially inwardly thereof, merging with the radial sections into the lower skirt portion along a substantially continuous circular line of junction lying in a single plane parallel to-the top, the inner diameter of the lower skirt portion being substantially equal to the outer diameter of the upper skirt portion, whereby the nesting of a plurality of closures in a stack is controlled with the lower edge of the lower skirt portion of one closure, at the circular line of junction with the flange, encircling the upper skirt portion of the closure therebelow and seated upon the shoulder of the latter.

5. A container closure comprising a flat, circular top, an imperforate depending skirt and an outwardly extending, corrugated locking flange at the lower end of the skirt, said top being marginally connected to the skirt by a downwardly rounded, gently curved portion, said skirt comprising an upper portion merging with said curved portion, a circumierentially continuous, downwardly extending shoulder projecting outwardly at the lower end of said skirt portion a distance substantially equal to the thickness of the material of the skirt,,and a lower substantially cylindrical portion of a height at least as great as said upper portion depending from the outer end of the shoulder and connected at its lower end to said flange by a circumferentially continuous, outwardly turned corner, said shoulder being adapted to control the nesting of a plurality of said closures in a stack, with the lower cylindrical skirt portion of one closure snugly encircling the upper skirt portion of the closure therebelow, and with said outwardly turned corner of the upper closure supported upon the shoulder of thelatter.

STANLEY W. DENNIS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this, patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Re. 19,422 Booth Jan. 15, 1935 619,603 Northall Feb. 14, 1899 777,168 Wood Dec. 13, 1904 888,995 Godman May 26, 1908 922,779 Kirkegaard May 25, 1909 934,072 Hicks Sept. 14, 1909 955,380 Calleson Apr. 19, 1910 1,131,676 Cake Mar. 16, 1915 1,257,992 Gavaza Mar. 5, 1918 1,744,444 Carvalho Jan. 21, 1930 1,745,929 Grimmeisen Feb. 4, 1930 1,956,215 Booth Apr. 24, 1934 1,956,217 Booth Apr. 24, 1934 2,048,062 Elder July 21, 1936 2,186,519 Buono Jan. 9, 1940 2,345,876 Kohrtz Apr. 4, 1944

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2605730 *Mar 3, 1948Aug 5, 1952Crown Cork & Seal CoApparatus for making container closures
US2751813 *Feb 24, 1954Jun 26, 1956Zeiss CarlOptical system for photogrammetric plotting instruments
US2756921 *May 21, 1952Jul 31, 1956Sternau Martin MClosure for receptacles
US2864546 *Nov 7, 1955Dec 16, 1958American Can CoCover for paper containers
US2879917 *May 18, 1956Mar 31, 1959Lily Tulip Cup CorpNestable plastic containers
US2922563 *Aug 5, 1957Jan 26, 1960American Can CoSnug fitting container closure
US2998178 *Feb 4, 1957Aug 29, 1961Reynolds Metals CoLined container for liquids and liner therefor
US3000526 *Apr 22, 1957Sep 19, 1961Fords LtdBottle caps
US3104045 *Aug 12, 1960Sep 17, 1963American Can CoContainer and closure therefor
US3447734 *Oct 3, 1966Jun 3, 1969Phillips Petroleum CoClosure,and apparatus for making a closure
US3941269 *Mar 27, 1974Mar 2, 1976Valer FlaxBottle capsules
US4163504 *Dec 8, 1977Aug 7, 1979Owens-Illinois, Inc.Metal end having fluted end curl
US4337871 *Sep 12, 1980Jul 6, 1982Mauri Brothers & Thomson (Aust.) Pty. LimitedCrown closure
US5458253 *Sep 1, 1993Oct 17, 1995Zapata Technologies, Inc.Bottle cap
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/328, 126/39.00M, 229/5.82, 206/519, 206/508
International ClassificationB21D51/48, B21D51/38, B65D41/12, B65D41/02, B21D51/44
Cooperative ClassificationB21D51/48, B65D41/12, B21D51/44
European ClassificationB21D51/44, B65D41/12, B21D51/48