Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2498006 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 21, 1950
Filing dateApr 13, 1948
Priority dateApr 13, 1948
Publication numberUS 2498006 A, US 2498006A, US-A-2498006, US2498006 A, US2498006A
InventorsRidill Joe R
Original AssigneeRidill Joe R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for training golfers
US 2498006 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 21, 1950 J. R. RIDILL DEVICE FOR TRAINING GOLFERS Filed April 13, 1948 INVENTOR.

7 JOE 1e. RID/LL latented Feb. 21, 1950 UNITED S TATS rem" .orricr DEVICE FOR TRAINING GOIiFERS Joe R. Ridill, Garfield-Heights, Ohio Application April'l3, 1948,.Serial' N 0. 120,808

The present invention relates to a device for training golfers in effecting proper habits for drivinggolf balls.

.swingingrmotion of the arms on a golf stroke, improved gripping of the golf club, proper positioning of the arms and hands-throughout the'stroke, and proper stance and shifting of weight during the stroke.

Another object of the invention is toprovide a golf training device which will permit visual checking 'of positions of the hands relative to the 'feet and body of the golfer during any part of the golf stroke.

Still another object'of the invention is to provide a training device for golfers which will cause control of the golfing stroke to reside in the leading arm, i. e., the left arm of a right handed player and the right arm of a left handed player.

Other objects and advantages of the invention willbe apparent'from the following description of a preferred form of the invention, reference being'made to the accompanying drawings wherein:

.Fig. .1 is a'perspective view of a resilient mem- -ber and attaching means forming a part of the training device;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view ofa wrist band for attaching the resilient member to the wrist of the golfer;

Fig. 3 is a strap for attaching one end of the resilient member to the heel of the golfer;

:Figs. 4,'5.-and 6 illustrate the use of a training device; and,

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a strap for att-a'chment to a, heel of the golfer when the training device'is used in-the manner illustrated in Fig. 6.

It is my observation that many right-handed golfers do not make proper use of'their left arm in driving golf balls'in that the right arm and hand controls the club during the stroke. This results'in inefficient and poor driving or shots. By the useof my training device the golfer is unconsciously trained to more full utilize his left arm and left side to more efficiently execute the vgolf stroke. To bring about this use of the left arm and side, I have provided a resilient member |!,-one end of which may be attached to the left wrist and the opposite end of which may be attachedto either heel of the golfer so that during the golf stroke the golfer must overcome spring 'tension'when moving his arms in the upswing 4 Claims. ((31.1'273-Q-35) preparatory to swinging -'on the *ball and also in the follow-through after the ball has been struck. The resilient member when attached'to the golfer in the manner described will cause'the arms to swing downwardly close to the body sothat the ball will be squarely hit. *By-placing-this tension 'on the left wrist the player, in overcomingitheresistancebecomes more conscious of hisleft hand and as a result he will grip the golf club more 11.

firmly with the left hand throughoutthe entire stroke. Also, the player will tend to keep his weight forwa'rdand head down which improves the ability to hit the ball.

In the present form-of the invention the resilient member I!) consists of a relatively long coil steelspring, one end of which is adapted to be attache'd 'to the wrist by a short'length of a cord ll attachedto a clip 12 which is pivotally connectedto the cord by -a-swive1 joint [3. A wrist band 55 is provided for strappingto the left wrist and'theclip l 2 is adapted'to be hooked to an eye It attached to the wristband. Preferably, the wrist band is attached to the wrist so that the eye It will be on the inside of thewrist. The spring 1 0 is of such specifications that it wil1 exert a down-ward tension throughout the arc of swing of the left hand-when the latter is moved through a ball driving stroke.

The-opposite end of the spring 12 is connected to the heel ofthe player'by'a non-elastic cord-20 which is-looped as .at'ZI through a'swivel joint eye "23 carrying ahook 24. "Ihe'loop end of the cord is provided with a toggle clamp '26 which can be secured at any point along the cordzllto adjust the effective lengthof the cord-between the end of the spring 10 and the clip 24, thus providing an adjustment of the spring: tension on -the wrist of the player. A strap 2'8.havingan"eye"29 rivetedthereto is adapted to be zstrapped Ltorthe heel of the playersshoe with theeye on the-inside of the heel; Il1e -clip:24 is hooked to the eye. 29 whenthe device is used. The length of the cord .20 is such that it will extend from the right heel of the player to the left heel andupwardly around the outside of the left leg and to the front of the golfer.

One use of the device "is'illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5' wherein one end of the device is connected to the left wrist of the. golfer and'the opposite end is connected-to the'left heel. It'will be seen that when the arms are-brought overthe-right shoulder the left arm must stretch the spring l0 and thereby bring into play the muscles of the left arm and side. At the sametime the spring will exert, a lifting action on the left heel so thatthe .golfer will be conscious :of the shifting .oflhis weight to the right foot on the upswing. Also, the resistance to the upswinging of the left arm will cause a tighter gripping of the left hand to the golf club thereby enforcing control of the club by the left hand. On the down swing the left heel pulls the left arm downward by the spring so that the left leg is braced prior to the time the left arm swings to the impact position. At the same time the spring tends to draw the arms inwardly toward the body which causes hitting from the inside. The spring tension during the down swing also causes the player to brace his left leg and receive the weight of his body and the left arm will hit against the braced left leg at the bottom of the swing. On the upswing as illustrated in Fig. the left arm must stretch the spring Hi again which causes firm gripping of the club and which will also tend to maintain the balance of the player forward, all of which promotes closer :control of the club during the golf swing.

The wrist band prevents exaggerated cocking of the wrist so that a more natural snapping of the wrist will be developed.

The device may be also used in the manner illustrated in Fig. 6 in which the band 28 is applied to the right heel of the golfer and a second band 3! is attached to the left heel of the golfer which band includes a hook clip 32 rigidly attached to the band and extending upwardly from the rear of the heel. The cord 20 extends through the clip 32 then upwardly around the outside of the left leg in the manner shown in Figs. 4 and 5. In addition to th training effected when used in the manner described with reference to Figs. 4 and 5, the tension on the right heel and th upward tension on the left heel will tend to emphasize the proper shifting of weight to the right side on the backswing of the stroke. The pressure of the cord 20 against the left leg also emphasizes proper position of the left leg to shift the leg to the right.

I have found that with the device attached to the body as described, and practicing the golf stroke without hitting the ball, an acute sense of the use of the left arm and side is developed, and when the device is removed the golfer will unconsciously utilize to a greater extent his left arm and left side during his actual play. Also, the golfer will unconsciously assume the proper stance or balance in maintaining the weight of his body forward rather than rearing backward during the stroke.

The golfer may also check the relative position of his wrist and feed with my device. For example, as is illustrated in Fig. 5, at the end of the strokethe left wrist should be substantially directly above the left heel, and this may be observed by noticing the position of the spring ill at that point of the stroke. Similarly, to check the proper initial back swing the golfer may attach the lower end of the spring to his right heel so that on the backswing he may easily determine when his wrists are directly above his right heel by observing the spring iii.

For best results the device is used when merely in going through the motions of the driving stroke either with or without a club, and during actual play it is preferable not to wear the device.

When the device is used by a left handed person it will be applied in the same manner but on the opposite side of the body.

It is to be understood that although I have described but one form of the invention, obviously other forms might b adopted, all falling within the scope of the claims which follow.

Iclaim:

l. A device for training in golf comprising, an elongated member having at least a part thereof resiliently stretchable, a wrist encircling element at one end of said member adapted to be attached to the wrist of a person, and a device at the opposite end of said member adapted to be attached to the heel of a foot of the person, said elongated member being of such length that when connected with the wrist and heel and extended around the outside of the leg carrying said foot it yieldingly resists upward movement of the arm and yieldingly draws upwardly on the heel when the arm is raised, and said member being freely swingable across the front of the person when the arm with which said member is connected swings from one side to the other as in a golf stroke.

2. A device for training in golf comprising, an elongated member having at least a part thereof resiliently stretchable, a wrist encircling element at one end of said member adapted to be attached to the wrist of a person, a devic at the opposite end of said member adapted to be attached to the heel of a foot of the person, said elongated member being of such length that when connected with the wrist and heel and extended about the outside of the leg carrying said foot it yieldingly resists upward movement of the arm and yieldingly draws upwardly on the heel when the arm is raised, and said member being freely swingable across the front of the person when the arm with which said member is connected swings from one side to the other as in a golf stroke, and means for adjusting the effective length of said elongated member.

3. A device for training in golf comprising, an elongated member having at least a part thereof resiliently stretchable, a wrist encircling element at one end of said member and adapted to be attached to the wrist of a person, a device at the opposite end of said member and adapted to be attached to the heel of a foot of the person, an eye guide attachable to the other heel of the person and freely receiving said elongated member whereby said elongated member is extendible from the first mentioned heel through said guide and upwardly about the outer side of the leg carrying the foot having said other heel, said elongated member being of such length that when connected with the wrist and heel it yieldingly resists upward movement of the arm and yieldingly draws upwardly on said other heel when the arm is raised, and said member bein freely swingable across the front of the person when the arm with which said member is connected swings from one side to the other as in a golf stroke.

4. A device for training in golf comprising, an elongated coil spring, a wrist encircling element connected to one end of said spring and adapted to be attached to the wrist of a person, and a device at the opposite end of said spring and adapted to be attached to the heel of a foot of the person, said device including a cord-like element extendible from the heel upwardly and about the outer side of the leg carrying said foot to the front side of the leg, said spring and element being of such length that when the spring is so connected with the wrist and heel of a person it yieldingly resists upward movement of the arm and yieldingly draws upwardly on the heel when the arm is raised, said spring being freely swingable across the front of the person when the arm with which said sprin is connected swings from one side to the other as in a golf stroke.

JOE R. RIDILL.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Hall Mar. 28, 1893 Raabe May 29, 1900 Muller Feb. 5, 1907 Feustel July 14, 1925 Marsh Nov. 26, 1929 Nelson et a1. June 12, 1934

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US494197 *Oct 19, 1892Mar 28, 1893 Manual gymnasium for musicians
US650656 *Nov 20, 1899May 29, 1900Julius A RaabeExercising apparatus.
US843478 *Jan 6, 1905Feb 5, 1907Kolberger Anstalten Fuer Exterikultur Wilhelm Anhalt Ges Mit Beschraenkter HaftungPhysical exerciser.
US1545953 *Jun 9, 1924Jul 14, 1925Alfred Hoffman IncTension device
US1736930 *Mar 26, 1928Nov 26, 1929Marsh Charles TFinger-exercising device
US1962256 *Jan 30, 1933Jun 12, 1934Ledgerwood Carl WTraining device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2835249 *May 20, 1954May 20, 1958Benny BrandanoBaby tender
US2860424 *Jun 6, 1955Nov 18, 1958Mckinnou Malcolm NChild's walking training device
US2943581 *May 10, 1955Jul 5, 1960Bendik Stephen JSteadying device
US3083016 *Aug 11, 1960Mar 26, 1963Lawrence W SumegiGolf indoor practice device
US3109244 *Apr 13, 1962Nov 5, 1963Helen TrifaroMethod of teaching and correcting a golf club swing
US3290043 *Oct 21, 1963Dec 6, 1966Sorensen Walter HExercising device
US3415524 *Jan 28, 1965Dec 10, 1968Robert M. VickersGolf swing training apparatus
US3680869 *Aug 3, 1971Aug 1, 1972Brady Joseph PGolf training device
US3740052 *Mar 9, 1972Jun 19, 1973T ArkinGolf practice device
US4073490 *Jun 4, 1976Feb 14, 1978Feather Jack VincentBody attached restraining type exercising device
US4093211 *Feb 4, 1977Jun 6, 1978Hughes Thomas ECombination jump rope and flexible exerciser
US4355810 *Dec 22, 1980Oct 26, 1982Rydeck Joseph PGolf club swing training device
US4478414 *Feb 28, 1983Oct 23, 1984Lawrence MolloyElastic ankle and knee exerciser
US4540173 *Dec 12, 1983Sep 10, 1985Hopkins Jr David EBody attached elastic type exercising device
US4544155 *Aug 15, 1983Oct 1, 1985Leroy R. Perry, Jr.Exercise device with stretchable elastomeric line
US4747779 *Oct 20, 1986May 31, 1988Gym-Thing, Inc.Form-keeping device for gymnasts and spring board divers
US4955608 *Feb 13, 1989Sep 11, 1990Dougherty Patrick FAthletic movement trainer
US5060942 *Nov 2, 1990Oct 29, 1991Dalme, Inc.Stroke training device
US5135459 *Jun 3, 1991Aug 4, 1992Perry Jr Leroy RAdductor contraction exercise apparatus and method
US5163890 *Jul 1, 1991Nov 17, 1992Perry Jr Leroy RAdductor contraction exercise apparatus and method
US5224913 *May 11, 1992Jul 6, 1993Rodibaugh Albert CSpring exerciser
US5263916 *Jul 27, 1992Nov 23, 1993Bobich John LResilient exercise device
US5295936 *Jun 15, 1992Mar 22, 1994Perry Jr Leroy RAdductor contraction exercise apparatus and method
US5303927 *Oct 23, 1992Apr 19, 1994J. David EllerGolf swing training device and method
US5340110 *Jun 7, 1993Aug 23, 1994Michael MollisFirm-grip swing trainer
US5397122 *Feb 28, 1994Mar 14, 1995Herridge, Ii; Bert T.Golf club swing connecting device
US5476257 *Sep 12, 1994Dec 19, 1995Bobby; AndrewTennis racket stroke training device
US5487546 *Mar 2, 1995Jan 30, 1996Yasuda; John P.Golf training method
US5524893 *Jul 21, 1995Jun 11, 1996Mcginnis; Cameron J.Apparatus for golf swing training
US5545113 *Apr 3, 1995Aug 13, 1996Bobich; John L.Combination athletic shoe and resilient exercise device
US5653668 *Aug 3, 1995Aug 5, 1997Wilkinson; William T.Buttock exercise device
US5688184 *Jul 16, 1996Nov 18, 1997Trio Johnson, Inc.Golf swing trainer
US5813954 *Nov 18, 1996Sep 29, 1998William T. WilkinsonButtock exercise device
US6368258 *May 2, 2000Apr 9, 2002Edward J. EmlawExercise system
US6375582Oct 10, 2001Apr 23, 2002George P. HarrisGolf swing aid with alignment and positioning rule
US6612845Nov 15, 2000Sep 2, 2003Mark A. MacriApparatus and method for training body movements in athletics
US6620052 *Jan 16, 2002Sep 16, 2003John PiattGolf-swing training harness
US6790165 *Sep 3, 2002Sep 14, 2004Chih-Hung HuangRehabilitation aid
US7214171Oct 26, 2004May 8, 2007Sheila Thelen, Inc.Athletic training device
US8002681 *Oct 28, 2009Aug 23, 2011Coreathletics LlcResistance training tool
US8012073Dec 22, 2009Sep 6, 2011Michael Charles BarnettFitness machine with automated variable resistance
US8317667 *Jan 20, 2012Nov 27, 2012Karl ThomasPortable exercise device and method of using the same
US8337371 *Dec 16, 2010Dec 25, 2012Vollmer Jr David LMethod and hands-free apparatus for muscle isolation during weight lifting exercise
US8453263 *Feb 22, 2011Jun 4, 2013A. Alex WortmanSystem to improve swinging motion
US8562494 *Jan 19, 2012Oct 22, 2013Karl ThomasPortable exercise device and method of using the same
US8961376 *Feb 25, 2011Feb 24, 2015Mark SweeneyApparatus and method to stretch upper and lower extremities
US9033855 *Jun 27, 2012May 19, 2015John D. OpferAthletic speed training device using biofeedback
US9079062Jan 31, 2013Jul 14, 2015Karl ThomasPortable exercise device and method of using the same
US9162100 *Apr 4, 2013Oct 20, 2015Kyle Patrick RasnakeAthletic training device
US20050096201 *Oct 26, 2004May 5, 2005Thelen Sheila E.Athletic training device
US20050277527 *Jun 14, 2004Dec 15, 2005Diane GregersonTherapeutic knee exercise apparatus
US20060183609 *Apr 6, 2006Aug 17, 2006Flynn Thomas SMethod and apparatus for performing stretching and strengthening exercises
US20100041499 *Oct 22, 2009Feb 18, 2010Paul ReynoldsBatter training device with improved visual indicator
US20100113231 *Oct 28, 2009May 6, 2010Todd KoppResistance Training Tool
US20110160025 *Dec 16, 2010Jun 30, 2011Vollmer Jr David LMethod and hands-free apparatus for muscle isolation during weight lifting exercise
US20110277208 *Feb 22, 2011Nov 17, 2011Wortman A AlexSystem to improve swinging motion
US20120220435 *Feb 25, 2011Aug 30, 2012Mark SweeneyApparatus and Method to Stretch Upper and Lower Extremities
US20120264535 *Mar 29, 2012Oct 18, 2012O'brien FrankGolf training aid having tension strap
US20130303344 *Apr 4, 2013Nov 14, 2013Kyle Patrick RasnakeAthletic training device
US20140005014 *Jun 27, 2012Jan 2, 2014John D. OpferAthletic speed training device using biofeedback
US20150133273 *Jan 20, 2015May 14, 2015Mark SweeneyApparatus and method to stretch upper and lower extremities
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/217, 434/252, 482/124, 482/125
International ClassificationA63B69/00, A63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3623, A63B69/0059
European ClassificationA63B69/00N4B