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Publication numberUS2499409 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1950
Filing dateSep 3, 1943
Priority dateSep 3, 1943
Publication numberUS 2499409 A, US 2499409A, US-A-2499409, US2499409 A, US2499409A
InventorsNorway Harold L
Original AssigneeBastian Blessing Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquefied petroleum gas dispensing system
US 2499409 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 7, 1950 H. L. NORWAY LIQUEFlED PETROLEUM GAs DIsPENsING SYSTEM Filed Sept. 5, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Wrth! mg NQ KD CQ INVENTOR. l/

March 7, 1950 H. l.. NORWAY LIQUEFIED PETROLI-:uu GAS DISPENSING sys'rm Filed sept. s, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 "llumllll" INVENTOR. 8495/40/62 /Q/w/a D /1/ 5- .a )f7/lg( Patented Mar. 7, 1950- LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS DISPENSING SYSTEM Harold L. Norway, Evanston, lll., assigner to The Bastian Blessing Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application September 3, 1943, Serial No. 501,074

Claims. (Cl. 62-1) l The present invention relates' to liqueed petroleum gas dispensing` systems and is a continuation in part of my application which matured into Patent No. 2,400,570 on May 21, 1946, to cover divisible subject matter therein.

The petroleum product employed in the system 2 an improved means for determining the level of liquid in the tank and for evacuating from the tank such foreign fluids as water.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved means for preventing the lling of the tank above 'a predetermined level.

with which the present invention is concerned,

is preferably a hydrocarbon of the paramn series, such as butane or propane, or a mixture of both, and the fuel is preferabLv stored in an underground tank in the form of a liqueiied gas which, with the assistance of the heat of the earth and reduction in pressure is vaporized for use in a dwelling as a substitute for natural gas.

One way of vaporizing the liqueed gas is the so-called batch system in which the vaporization is carried on in the storage tank and vapor is withdrawn in the form of gas from the tank. The other way of vaporizing the liqueiied gas is the so-called ash system in which the liquefied gas is withdrawn as a liquid from the tank and passed through a pressure reducing regulator which causes the liquid to iiash into vapor.

Wherever the vaporization takes place, heat units are absorbed from surrounding parts, and, in the batch system,lthis refrigerating action is largely expended in the tank, whereas with the flash system, the heat absorption is concentrated in a comparatively small space, namely around the pressure reducing device and adjacent parts.

Although the present invention will improve vaporization and operating conditions for both systems, it is primarily of interest with the flash systems having for one of its objects the adaptation of the ash process to take advantage of the benefits derived with batch systems in that latent heat of vaporization is supplied from the warmth of the liquid contents in the tank as in the case of batch vaporization.

A further object of the invention is to prevent frosting ofthe body of the regulator in which the ash vaporization takes place. In this .connection, another object of the invention is to submerge in an anti-freeze solution, those parts of the regulator which are subject to the refrigerating effect which follows the absorption of the latent heat of vaporization that accompanies pres- Y sure reduction.

Another object of the invention is to circulate an anti-freeze liquid convectively in heat exchange contact with the rst stage regulator and a source of heat, in this instance the'source of heat preferably being the heat of the earth.

A further purpose of the invention is to vent the regulator to the same anti-freeze liquid which conveys heat to the regulator. Y

Another object of the invention is to place a ash regulator in contact with a liquid exposed to a source of heat such as the earth over an area greatly in excess of the area of the regulator.

v Another object of the invention is to provide A further object of the invention is to provide an improved shutoff control for the gas supply leading from the tank which is not exposed to atmospheric temperatures.

Another purpose of the invention is to provide a dispensing system of the class described where, under normally expected conditions of heavy withdrawal, a revaporizer is not needed, yet without changing the general organization of standardized parts a` revaporizer may be used where extra heavy withdrawals of gas are anticipated and condensation is likely to be incurred.

A further purpose of the inventionis to provide a rugged, unitary tank assembly which is simple in constructon, easy to make, readily placed in operation and serviced.

These being among the objects of the invention, other and further objects will become apparent from the drawings, the description relating thereto and the appended claims.

Referring now to the drawings: Fig. 1 is a fragmentary vertical section taken longitudinally lthrough the tank, standpipe and eduction cavityiillustrating one of the improved embodiments of the invention.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the standpipe illustrated in Fig. l showing the arrangement of the various elements thereon as projected upon the associated parts in the tank which are indicated in broken I lines.

Fig. 3 is an elevational view partly in section of an improved -form of a means for preventing the lling of atank above a predetermined level.

Fig. 4 is anv enlarged vertical section showing the relative location'of the elements associated with the standpipe.

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the top of thev standpipe.

As already mentioned, the invention ization'where a liqueiied gas is forced froma where it is reduced vto a service pressure of 6 ounces per square inch. In the drawing, a Stor-5;I age tank is indicated at I I as buried in theearthlf I2, below the irost line I3 normally expected tov i exist in the region where the installation is made.

Tank construction The tank comprises a cylindrical centxal w is illus. trated in connection with a flash system of vapor-v I4 apertured on the top at i5 to receive the standpipe which is welded therein as by a weld line l1. On its bottom, the shell I4 is provided with an opening I8 that partially overlaps a vertical projection of the opening I5, and the opening I8 is closed by a cup 2l welded thereto as at 22 to provide a sump 23. A support 24 for the revaporization coil 25 is welded upon the inside of the shell I4 asat 28 and for purposes of installing thetank properly in place so that the sump 28 works most effectively, the standpipe I8 is so positioned as to provide an angle at 21 which is slightly in excess of a right angle. When the tank is buried, the plumbing of the standpipe I8 will assure that any water collecting in the tank will lie to the right of the sump 23 until such time as the amount of water will exceed a depth of 1" or 1%" after which it will now into the sump 23, the excess collecting there over and above that expected to be present after the tank has been tested hydraulically in its pressure test.

Both ends of the cylindrical shell are closed by caps 3| and 32 secured by welds 33. The cap is apertured as at 34 to receive the well member 35 welded therein as at 38 to provide a cavity 31 in the tank, and the tank is preferably constructed and assembled in this order.

Standpipe construction The standpipe I8 comprises a cylindrical casing 38 closed at the top by a wall 4| spaced from the top 42 a sumcient distance to provide a recess 43 therein. Y

Referring to Figs. 2, 4 and 5, a slip tube gauge 44 is threaded into an opening 45 in the wall 4|.

The gauge 44 extends downwardly and its lower end 48 enters the sump 23 at the bottom of the tank Il. The lower end 48 is provided with a stop 41 which prevents complete removal of the slip tube gauge and in addition to the slip tube gauge functioning in the conventional manner to determine the level of the liquid in the tank, the stop 41 has an opening 5| therein with the mouth of the opening close to the bottom of the sump 23 so that wat'er present in the sump will be evacuated through the slip tube gauge whenever the slip tube gauge is all the way down and the top is vented in the same manner in which the slip tube is employed as a gauge. The slip tube gauge would be left open as long as it was` discharging water and could be closed again whenever liqueiled gas began to flow.

The tank is filled through a ill pipe indicated at 52 as secured in the threaded opening 53. The ll pipe is so constructed and arranged that it can be completely assembled outside the tank and inserted into place in the standpipe I8 through the opening 53. The top of the fill pipe 52 is provided With a back pressure check valve which is opened by the pressure forcing liquid into the tank and the bottom 54 thereof is threaded at 55, as more particularly shown in Fig. 3, to receive a iltting 58 having a discharge opening 51 in the side thereof and a iiap shuto valve 58 pivoted as at 6I on the bottom and outside thereof where it is easily assembled.

The flap valve 58 is held normalLv opened by a weight 82 upon the other end of a curved arm 83 which extends through the opening 51 to control the movement of the valve 58. A recess 84 protected by a shielding lip 85 receives the flap valve 58 in one side of the fitting 58 where it is protected against a closing action of the flow of liquid passing down the pipe. through the openrelated that an Yappreciable upward pressure upon the weight 82 will cause the ilapvalve 88 to leave the recess 84 and enter the path of the incoming uid. The flowing fluid then enters th'e cavity 84 and forces or causes the valve to'elose under the pressure of the incoming fluid. When closed the valve positively stops the flow of liquid into the tankinamannerpreventingthefillingofthe tank above a predetermined level. A valve acl0 tuating means that is responsive to' the level of the liquid in the tank, such as a float 88 is employed to actuate the valve at the proper time in the illling operation.

In order to actuate the valve 88 the float 88 is u mounted upon an arm 81 which is pivotally n determined safe filling level.

Although in less expensive installation, the oat 88 might serve as a weight, it is preferred that the weight 82 be provided and be movable separate from the float away from the arm 81 when the flap u valve 58 is closed. In this way there is no straining of parts when the valve 88 is closed quickly by the incoming liquid and once the liquid supply lineis turned off at the service tank, a vent-hole 1| will permit the liquid to drain through the flap u valve and permit the weight 82 to reopen the valve 58.

It is preferred that the opening 81 be directed towards the left end of the tank as shown in Fig. 1 whereby the eddy current developed by the 35 incoming liquid will tend to keep any water resulting from condensation in the tank away from the liquid eduction tube 18.

In this way a positive shutoff is provided to prevent an overillling of the tank, thereby avoiding 40 the deficiencies of conventional practice in which vapor return gauges are inadequate due to the peculiar nature of the liquefied petroleum gas. With certain conventional devices the continuanceofflllingpressuresinthetankcausesa a liquecation ofthe gases already there and the levetl continues to rise 'regardless of a dip tube ven Although a vapor return connection is not entirely necessary, one is shown at 12 as threaded into an opening 13 in the wall 4|. A safety check valve (not shown) is provided in the vapor return 12 which is opened when the nomle of the vapor return base is connected thereto.

AA pressure gauge 14 and a safety relief valve u 88 are mounted upon the wall 4| and also a shaft 15 which can be manually turned by the winged handle 18 to control the passage of liquid through the eduction pipe 18, more specifically described hereinafter.

.o The lower end of the shaft 15 is provided with a wrench socket 18 having a flared mouth 8| which serves as a guide to engage with the valve shaft 82 which controls the operation of the eduction tube 18.

u When the tank is buried in the ground, the

upper part of the standpipe I8 is located in a concrete box or vault 83 having a cover plate 84 secured thereto by bolts 85. The cover 84 seals the space 88 and a vent 81 is provided for free 70 venting of the vault to atmosphere in the event the safety relief valve is called upon to function. In order to prevent water from collecting in the recess 43 at the top of the standpipe the walls of the standpipe are drilled as at 88 just above the ing 81. The valve 88 and the weight 82 are so 75 wall 4| to drain water collecting in the recess 43.

with gas burning'lapplianzc'e Assemb I *y y Inassembling 4the eductiomcavityallthe parts)` are assembledthereto land *the unit is theng-m-L. L ber 'ca y serted into .the/opening-34l and Vwelded 'inlplace kby n is .pref'erfea ffhatv-the'vawe, masser be negar-:4.o the Weldffline "3 after- -lwhich' the Vvalve COHtf-Ol-f tive opening rgais'te'w'f thel nd'idgss'on w shaft I5-*1s inserted :andflowered toiengage the,l that; thvvalve .cmatmetrflgablcatdw a socket-z18foverthe :valve shaft182: andzi'sguided by upon the pres's'uresideofthevalve. Tethre* the engagement 019th?latter'*Withthe'nared' is nol rneedl'for packing,fyihefthejalye 'Stemisz mouth 8LA .'The-.mechanicrcanz see tofdofthisuby I is threaded through thewawejcap- .HIM-spat "z 35 looking;through the relativelyylargefopening53.-

an excessive amount of water is 4presenizalt mvav g th tFlnonbetweetheoat jl one time aroundwthe First stage feauldtgr comprises-a ing the further ilow of liquid gas to the tank and assuring that the tank will not be filled above a predetermined level.

During or after the filling operation the valve |03 may be opened to place the tank in operation. Thereafter liquefied gas will ilow to the first stage regulator and be there reduced in pressure and simultaneously supplied with heat from the liquid body in which the regulator body is submerged.

The heat absorbed from the liquid body is replaced convectively through the walls of the cavity 31 (Fig. 1). As heat is absorbed in this relationship the'body of liquid in the tank replaces it with heat absorbed from the earth.

Thus, it will be seen with the present construction that heat units are supplied directly in a new and improved manner to that part of the system, namely the ilrst stage regulator, where the greatest refrigerating effect is experienced.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes, modifications and alterations may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention, the scope of which is commensurate with the claims. v

What is claimed is:

1. In a liqueed petroleum gas system a storage tank having an opening therein, means for lling the tank including an inlet passageway, means for controlling the ow of fluid through the passageway comprising a normally open cut-off valv, a iioat in the tank having all cross-sectional dimensions slightly less than the diameter of said opening and means operated by the float to close the valve when a predetermined lev'el is reached in the tank, said controlling means, float and oat operated means comprising an assembly insertable into the tank through said opening, and means for mounting the assembly in sealed relationship with respect to said opening.

2. In a liqueed petroleum gas system, a storage tank, means for lling the tank including' a conduit, means for controlling the how of fluid through the conduit comprising a valve seat facing upstream, a valve member closing with the flow of iiuid, a recess means in the conduit to receive the valve member laterally of the path of iiuid iiow, and means responsive to the level of the liquid for moving the valve member from the recess means to a position where it will close with the flow of liquid.

3. In a liquefied petroleum gas system, a stor age tank, means for filling the tank including a conduit, means for controlling the iiow of fluid through the conduit comprising a valve seat facing upstream, a valve member closing with the ow of fluid, a recess means in the conduit to receive the valve member laterally in the conduit and means responsive to the level of the liquid for moving the valve member into position where it will close with the flow of liquid.

4. In a liqueed petroleum gas system, a storage tank adapted to be buried in the ground below the frost line, a standpipe in communication with the tank and adapted to extend upward to a peint readily accessible from above the ground when the tank is buried, means for iilling the tank including an inlet passageway, means for controlling the flow of fluid through the passageway comprising a valve body insertable through the standpipe and -having a valve seat facing upstream, a valve member closing with the iiow of iiuid, and means responsive .to the level of the ing said riser pipe at the top thereof, said element having an opening therein smaller than the inside diameter of the riser pipe, a nlling assembly removably extending into theriser pipe through the opening in said element closing the top of said riser pipe, said assembly including a discharge fitting, a positive shutoff valve in said tting, and means received in the tank and responsive to the level of the liquid in the tank for closing the valv at a predetermined level.

6. In a liqueed petroleum gas system, a storage tank having an opening therein, a illling assembly removably extending through said opening into said tank, said assembly including a discharge tting, a positive shutoff valve in said tting, and means carried by said tting responsive to the level of the liquid in the tank for closing the valve at a predetermined level, said assembly and associated responsive means having an overall cross-sectional dimension capable of being received in an opening restricted substantially to a size suillcient to receive said responsive means.

7. VIn a liqueed petroleum gas system, a stor.

age tank buried in the ground and having a riser thereon, said riser having an opening in the upper end thereof accessible from above ground, lling means removably extending through said opening, said means including a conduit and said lling means also including an assembly mounted upon said conduit, said assembly comprising a positive shutoff valve for closing said conduit, and means responsive to the level of liquid in the tank for closing said valve when the liquid in the tank reaches a predetermined level.

8. In a liquefied petroleum gas system a storage tank having a riser pipe, means for illling the tank through the riser pipe including an element having a passageway, means for controlling the flow of fluid through the passage comprising a cutoff valve. a float in the tank carried by said element, and means actuated by the iloat to close the valve when a predetermined level is reached in the tank.

9. In a liquefied petroleum gas system a storage tank having an opening through a wall thereof, a iilling conduit removably extending through said opening, an assembly mounted on said conhaving another opening therein, a lling assembly removably extending into said tank through said othel` opening in said element, said assembly including a discharge fitting, a positive shutoff valve in said fitting, and means received in the tank through said other opening and responsive to the level of liquid in the tank for actuating the valve at a predetermined level.

HAROLD L. NORWAY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

, UNITED STATES PATENTS Number liquid in the tank for actuating the valve member. Name Date ,K 5. In a liquefied petroleum gas system, a stor- 2,121.675 White June 21, 1938 age tank having a riser pipe and an element clos- 75 2,230,741 Browning Feb. 4', 194

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2121675 *Oct 18, 1937Jun 21, 1938Southern Steel CoCombination fitting for gas dispensing systems
US2230741 *Feb 14, 1940Feb 4, 1941Browning James ETank filling means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2751755 *May 14, 1954Jun 26, 1956Superior Tank & Construction CPressure tank
US2951502 *May 8, 1957Sep 6, 1960Bastian Blessing CoHorizontal filler
US3053054 *Jan 23, 1961Sep 11, 1962Boudet Et CieInstallation for the expansion of a liquefied gas
US3078867 *Jun 21, 1961Feb 26, 1963Hugh D McgillisLiquid delivery control
US3756269 *Nov 19, 1971Sep 4, 1973Brown HMaximum liquid level control valve
US4628956 *Nov 13, 1985Dec 16, 1986Vecone Development CorporationFloat valve mechanism
US4640307 *Nov 28, 1983Feb 3, 1987Roberts & Associates Water And Waste Treatment LimitedFloat valve
US4667711 *Dec 20, 1985May 26, 1987Draft Roger ATank overfill valve
US4986320 *Apr 7, 1989Jan 22, 1991Kesterman James EDrop tube having an overfill valve
US5033519 *Jun 6, 1990Jul 23, 1991Ebw, Inc.Storage tank flow control valve
US5095937 *Jan 29, 1991Mar 17, 1992Ebw, Inc.Two stage automatic shut off valve
US5141019 *Jul 3, 1991Aug 25, 1992Ebw, Inc.Two stage automatic shutoff valve
US5174345 *Aug 13, 1990Dec 29, 1992Dover CorporationDrop tubes and overfill valves therefor
US5388622 *Nov 3, 1993Feb 14, 1995Ebw, Inc.Automatic shutoff valve
US6913047Apr 30, 2004Jul 5, 2005Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Drop tube assemblies adapted for use with a liquid reservoir
US7069965Apr 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Drop tube inserts and apparatus adapted for use with a riser pipe
US7128102Apr 30, 2004Oct 31, 2006Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Drop tube segments adapted for use with a liquid reservoir
US7213610Apr 30, 2004May 8, 2007Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Drop tube segments adapted for use with a liquid reservoir and methods
US7243675Apr 30, 2004Jul 17, 2007Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Drop tube segments adapted for use with a liquid reservoir
US7437815Apr 30, 2004Oct 21, 2008Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Systems adapted to cooperate with an aperture forming tool and methods
US20050241695 *Apr 30, 2004Nov 3, 2005Pendleton David RDrop tube segments adapted for use with a liquid reservoir and methods
US20050241696 *Apr 30, 2004Nov 3, 2005Kane Kristopher ADrop tube segments adapted for use with a liquid reservoir
US20050241722 *Apr 30, 2004Nov 3, 2005Pendleton David RDrop tube segments adapted for use with a liquid reservoir
US20050241723 *Apr 30, 2004Nov 3, 2005Pendleton David RDrop tube inserts and apparatus adapted for use with a riser pipe
US20050254910 *Apr 30, 2004Nov 17, 2005Kane Kristopher ASystems adapted to cooperate with an aperture forming tool and methods
USRE33555 *May 10, 1989Mar 19, 1991 Tank overfill valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/441, 137/448, 62/50.4
International ClassificationF17C7/00, F17C7/04
Cooperative ClassificationF17C7/04
European ClassificationF17C7/04