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Publication numberUS2500354 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1950
Filing dateFeb 24, 1945
Priority dateFeb 24, 1945
Publication numberUS 2500354 A, US 2500354A, US-A-2500354, US2500354 A, US2500354A
InventorsHarris Frederic R
Original AssigneeHarris Frederic R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for controlling silt accumulation
US 2500354 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 14, 1950 F. R. HARRIS APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING SILT ACCUMULATION Filed Feb. 24, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet l Z zw/we ATTORNEY.

March 14, 1950 F. R. HARRIS 2,500,354

APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING SILT ACCUMULATION Filed Feb. 24, 1945 s Sheets-Sheet 2 F reden'c' I ff arr/1s ATTORNEY.

March 14, 1950 F. R. HARRIS 2,500,354

APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING sm ACCUMULATION Filed Feb. 24, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 V {NVENTOK 1 g/ml Frfnrrwfijyarrzs ATTORNEY.

Patented Mar. 14, 1956 APPARATUS R CONTROLLING s'IL'r' ACCUMQLATION Frederic R.-Harris, New Ydl'k, N. Y.- Application February 24, 1945, Serial No. 579,633

This invention pertains to a method and apparatus for increasing the depth of a body of water otherwise and at lower cost than by ordinary dredging; and particularly the water at a site for a floating dry dock employed in the overhauling and repair of ships.

An important object of my invention is to control the accumulation of silt in slips and at other places selected for floating docks, so as to maintain a depth of water that it always sufficient for the work which the dock performs.

Many dry docks are located in rivers that flow through loamy and sandy areas, and then the water carries in suspension with it particles of sand and loam, termed river silt, which settles on the bottom when the current flow is slowed by an obstruction or a widening of the bed of the stream. This silt usually is in a state of fine subdivision; it is deposited extensively on the bottom, and the depth of the river soon becomes materially reduced.

A site for a floating dry dock often requires dredging so that the dock may be sunk deep enough to receive a vessel in the trough of the dock. A hole thus excavated at the bottom of the water naturally causes eddies and precipitation of silt in the depression will immediately set in; and deposit of silt at a rate of one foot per month under a floating dry dock is not uncommon.

Every foot of silt, of course, reduces the available draft of the dock over the keel blocks; and in a few months time the accumulation will lessen the depth of the water by several feet. Hence, dredging must frequently be undertaken, or the dock cannot give the service for which it was designed. But dredging necessitates the temporary shifting of the dock from its berth, and substantial time is lost when the dock is not in use.

In the practice of my invention, however, I have discovered that dredging and its attendant drawbacks can be avoided, and that the quantity of water which is discharged by the pumps to sink and raise the dock is .suificient to cause a flow of water directly under it to flush away the silt and keep the bottom of the water free.

of interfering accumulations. Therefore, by periodically sinking the dock and preferably tilting the dock one or two feet along its length, and discharging the full pumping capacity of water for a few hours outward toward the centerof the river, the required area of bottom under the dock will be elfectively deepened and no dredg ing at all will be needed. I

I Further, though many rivers now can only be utilized for relatively small docks, my invention will enable floating dry docks to be located in relatively small rivers and serve larger ships than has heretofore been feasible.

3 Claims. (01. 114-45) These and other objects and advantages will appear in the. following description, taken with the accompanying drawings, and the novel char- I acteristics are defined in the appended claims.

. scope and spirit thereof.

On the drawings:

Figure 1 shows how a dock is employed to sweep out silt from the bottom of a river directly beneath it.

Figure 2 shows in outline the bottom of a stream afterward.

Figure 3 illustrates in top plan the pump and pipe connections on the interior of a dock, as shown above the line 3-3 of Figure 4.

Figure 4 shows the same parts in side elevation.

Figure 5 shows in plan the supply pipes for the flushing system of the dock; and

Figure 6 presents in detail one of the flushing nozzles, viewed from the line 66 on Figure 4.

The same numerals identify the same parts throughout.

The dock has the conventional pontoon hull I and side walls 2. In the bottom of the hull are openings 3, over which are plates 4, which carry the discharge nozzles 5. The plates and nozzles of course close the holes or openings 3, to prevent leakage; and nozzles discharge jets of water 5 below the hull I towards the bottom of the stream 1 in a slanting direction. In action the dock is flooded so as to tilt up slightly at the end which is upstream, or if moored near the shore, the outshore end; and sunk deep enough for the nozzles to have the bottom I within effective range of their jets 6. Then enough silt can be washed away to excavate a depression of suflicient depth under the dock, as shown in Figure 2. The hull I has flooding inlets one of which appears at 8 on one side in Figure 4, for the admission of water to sink the dock; and a discharge port, shown at 9, for the discharge of water when the hull is pumped out for raising. The discharge opening is connected to a pump ID. The pump withdraws through a suction conduit H the water entering by way of the ports 8. The conduit H is joined to the inlet port of the casing of the pump, which is of the centrifugal type, and the outlet of the pump is coupled toa pipe l2 that supplies the nozzles 5. From the pipe l2 a branch pipe !3 I leads to the discharge port ID. The pipes 12 and 13 are controlled by gate valves [4 and it rej spectively; and a gate valve it controls each inlet8.

The'conduit I'Zleads to a header l1 having branch pipes l8. The header runs substantially parallel to the adjacent wall 2, and the lateral branch pipes l8 therefrom towards the middle of the hull. Each pipe l8 has a number of smaller pipes .l 9 connected thereto; and the pipes 19 lead to the nozzles 5. The latter slope downward away from one end of the hull and towards the opposite end; that is, approximately parallel to side walls 2. stalled on the other side of the clock.

The dock is sunk as shown in Figure 1 by-open-' ing the ports 8, the discharge ports 8 being closed. With the dock in position the valves l and [6 are closed and the valves 14 are opened and the pumps started to draw the water in the hull through the pipe II and deliver it to the pipe 12. Water is therefore impelled through the pipe l2, header l6, pipes l1 and all the nozzles to wash away silt from the bottom! andfdeepen the water under the clock, as depicted in Figure 2. Though the water may be too shallow at the start, as indicated by the distance between the surface S and bottom, a depression 20 of sufiicient depth is soon made.

Thus, dredgin can be dispensed with altogether. The cost of the additional piping and nozzles is much lower than the regular expense which dredging entails.

When the dock is to be submerged it is on the surface, and water that enters the inlet ports 8 is taken from near the surface where it is comparatively free from mud and dirt. After sinking, when the openings 8 and 9 are closed, the nozzles often require more water than the dock contains; but now the inlets 8 cannot be reopened because the additional water would then be taken from near the bottom and the silt therein would foul the interior of the dock. To admit more water recourse is therefore had to gate openings 2! in the outer faces of the walls 2. These openings are controlled by sliding ates 22, havin suitable connections 23 to hand wheels 24 at the tops of the walls 2. These inlet openings are high enough to take water from near the surface, where it is comparatively free from mud and silt, after the dock is submerged, and the fouling of the inside of the dock is thus prevented. A plentiful supply of virtually clean water is thus assured as long as the discharge from the jets 5 is continued.

The valves l4, I5 and iii are actuated by connections not shown; and the pump can be driven from a suitable source of power. that likewise need not be illustrated herein.

The dock is illustrated herein as having the usual trough shape, with pontoon hull and side walls, but it of course can be of any design, and built either in sections or as a single structural unit.

The interiors of the dock, of course, are divided into compartments and the dock can be sunk lower as indicated in Figure 1 by admitting enough water to the compartments at the end which is to be depressed.

My copending application No. 717,190, filed December 19, 1946, contains claims for the method disclosed herein; while the purpose of this application is to protect the construction of the dock. Having described my invention, what I believev tobenewis:

1. A floating dry dock having a hulland side walls and a. port at each sideof the .doclrfadjacent the bottom to admit'water to sink the'do'ck, a discharge port at each side, a power pump at The same arrangement is in each side, piping connecting each power pump to one of the discharge ports, the hull having transverse rows of openings in its bottom, plates over said openings, tilted nozzles mounted in said plates to discharge water slantwise through the bottom of the dock throughout its length towards one end thereof, piping connecting said pumps to the nozzles, and valves to control said piping, said dock having an-additional inlet in the upper part of a side wall to admit additional water to the dock after sinking, a valve to control said inlet and means extending to the top of said side wall to control said additional valve.

2. A floating dry dock having a hull and side walls and a port at each side of the dock adjacent the bottom to admit water to sink the dock, a discharge'port at each side, a power pump at each side, piping connecting each power pump to one of the discharge ports, tilted nozzles mounted in said bottom to discharge water slantwise through the bottom of the dock throughout its length towards one end thereof, pipin con-' necting said pumps to the nozzles, comprising longitudinal headers adjacent the. sides of the dock leading from said pumps, lateral branches leading from said headers, each branch being connected to a group of nozzles in transverse alinement, and valves to control said piping, said dock having an additional inlet in the uppe part of a side wall to admit additional water to the dock after sinking, a valve to control said inlet and means extending to the top of said side wall to control said additional valve.

3. A floating dry dock having a hull and side walls and a port at each side of the dock adjacent the bottom to admit water to sink the clock, a discharge port at each side, a power pump at each side, piping connecting each power pump to one of the discharge ports, the hull having transverse rows of openings in its bottom, plates over said openings, tilted nozzles mounted in said plates to discharge water slantwise through the bottom of the dock throughout its length towards one end thereof, piping connecting said pumps to the nozzles, comprising longitudinal headers adjacent the sides of the dock leading from said pumps, lateral branches leading from said headers, each. branch being connected to a group of nozzles in transverse alinement, and valves to control said piping, said dock having an additional inlet in the upper partof a side wall to admit additional water to the dock after sinking, a valve to control-said inlet and means extending to the top of said side wall to control said additional valve.

FREDERIC R. HARRIS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 184,998 'Iassey Dec. 5, 1,876 727,059 Balch May'5, 1903 1 749,171 Cunningham Jan. 12, 1904 1,803,191 Jennings Apr. 28, 1931 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 17,855 Great Britain Oct. 26, 1895

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US184998 *Sep 18, 1876Dec 5, 1876 Improvement in dredging-machines
US727059 *Nov 3, 1902May 5, 1903Glen E BalchApparatus for relieving grounded vessels.
US749171 *Apr 3, 1903Jan 12, 1904 cunningham
US1803191 *Aug 2, 1926Apr 28, 1931Jennings Irving CAir-vent-controlling mechanism for centrifugal pumps
GB189517855A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4273061 *May 25, 1978Jun 16, 1981Gotaverken Arendal AbFloating dock
US4399040 *Sep 21, 1981Aug 16, 1983Halliburton CompanyOpen sea skimmer barge
US4477348 *Mar 15, 1982Oct 16, 1984Halliburton CompanyOpen sea skimmer barge
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/45, 114/55, 37/344, 405/226
International ClassificationE02B3/02, E02B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationE02B3/02
European ClassificationE02B3/02