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Publication numberUS2500840 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1950
Filing dateApr 10, 1947
Priority dateApr 10, 1947
Publication numberUS 2500840 A, US 2500840A, US-A-2500840, US2500840 A, US2500840A
InventorsFerdon Jacob F, Lyons Frank H
Original AssigneeE L Bruce Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor cleaning device
US 2500840 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 14, 1950` F. H. I YoNs ETAI. 2,500,840

FLOOR CLEANING DEVICE Filed April 10, 1947 l/ff maa,...

IN V EN TOR.

provide an implement for easy application of scribed as oblong.

Patented Mar. 14, 195o l. 2,500,840

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE FLOOR CLEANING'DEVICE Frank H. Lyons, Memphis, Tenn., and Jacob F. Ferdon, Little Rock, Ark., assignors to E. L. Bruce- Co., Memphis, Tenn., a corporation of Delaware Application April 10, 1947, Serial No. 740,550

13 Claims. (Cl. 15V-231,)

1 2 This invention relates to a simple form of floor Figure 2 is a perspective View of the replacecleaning device and more particularly to a manable element of the implement. ually operable floor cleaning device primarily in- Figure 3 is a perspective View of the Dermatended for household use, such as is disclosed in nent part of the implement. our copending application Serial No. 683,606, 5 Figure 4 is a plan View of the underside of filed July 15, 1946, and now abandoned, and of the permanent part ofthe implement, with the which this application is a continuation-in-part. replaceable element removed.

There are on the market today various liquid Figure 5 is a sectional view taken on a line corcompositions for cleaning and maintaining linoresponding to 5--5 of Figure 1 of another emleum, wood, and other oors; and, the present bodiment of the permanent portion of the iminvention is primarily intended for use with a plement.

liquid cleaning composition which includes a wax Figure 6 is a side view of the replaceable poror waxes suspended in petroleum and/or coal tar tion of the implement, folded for packaging and solvents and which is non-aqueous in character. shipment.

Manual application of such cleaning liquids by Referring now to the drawings, it will be seen means of mops, rags, lambs wool and other simithat the floor cleaning implement of this invenlar materials involves much eiort and otherwise.- tion comprises two main parts namely, a replaceis not satisfactory. Such materials not only abable steel wool pad assembly, indicated generally sorb the cleaning agent and soon become matted at I, and a handled rigid backing member, indiand caked with dirt and dried wax, but also lack cated generally at 2. AlthOllgh the Shape 0f the a desirable mild abrasive action sulicient to repad l and backing member 2 is shown rectanmove dirty surface lms, particularly where polgular, the shape is not critical. Preferably, howishing compositions containing wax have been ever, the pad and backing member have a longer applied to the floor. dimension in one direction than in the other.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to Thus, a generally preferred shape may be decleaning and maintenance compositions to floors, The undersurface of the backing member 2 is the implement being so organized that it will provided with outwardly projecting exible fibers, not become matted and caked with dirt which indicated generally at 3 in Figures 1 and 5, which progressively impairs the effectiveness of a floor :lo engage the pad I. It has been found that the cleaning implement. combination of a layer oi steel wool 4, backed by Another object of this invention is to provide flexible fibers 3 arranged generally normal a floor cleaning implement, the working surface thereto, possesses desirable characteristics -for a of which will not absorb the liquid cleaning comfloor cleaning implement for use with many of position, but will spread the liquid uniformly :l5 the available liquid oor cleaning compositions. over the surface of the floor to be cleaned. The steel wool not only provides a mild abrasive Still another object of the invention is to proaction that is necessary to loosen thoroughly the vide a cleaning device that will furnish a desirsurface dirt, but being non-absorbent of the able mild abrasive action without scratching or cleaning composition used, does not become otherwise marring the surface finish of a floor. 40 matted with dirt and other foreign matter in use.

Another object of the invention is to provide Furthermore, the steel wool serves effectively to a floor cleaning implement with a wear element spread the cleaning liquid uniformly over the which may be replaced, simply and readily, after surface of the oor. The fibers 3 of the backing it has become excessively worn. member 2 provide a cushioned backing for the A further object of the invention is to provide steel wool 4 suiciently resilient to preclude its a labor-saving, manually-operable floor cleaning marring the finish of the floor, while at the same implement that can be used easily and comforttime permitting the wool to reach and clean all ably by an operator standing in an erect possurface depressions or uneven spots that may be tion, with the expenditure of very little effort. found on a oor. In addition, the fibers 3, when Other objects and advantages of the invention the implement is used, engage, and to some exwill become apparent from the following descriptent penetrate, the steel wool 4 toaid in holding tion and accompanying drawings in which: the latter in working position on the backing Figure 1 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view member 2 without relative slipping or sliding. through our oor cleaning implement assem- This engagement and penetration also acts to bled, ready for use upon aoor. prevent the steel wool from separating and rolling up in use. In this way, a substantially uniform thickness of the layer of steel wool 4 is maintained until it becomes so thin, by wear, that replacement is necessary.

The fibers 3 of the backing member 2 may be provided in several ways, two of which are shown in the drawings. As shown in Figures l and 4, the undersurface of the backing member 2 is covered with pile carpeting in which the base fabric 5 preferably is provided with spaced areas of pile arranged to form generally parallel rows of tufts 6 with intermediate clearance spaces l. The carpeting preferably is of the cut pile type, but it has been found that uncut pile carpeting also gives satisfactory results. The carpeting is cemented, stapled, or otherwise suitably secured to the undersurface of the backing member 2 with the rows of tufts 5 extending transversely thereof. As an example of dimensions which give satisfactory results, the base fabric 5 of the carpeting when uncompressed by use may be about le inch thick and the pile tufts 6 about 1/8 inch long. The rows of tufts 6, form a deflnitely ribbed surface, with, for example, about live ridges to the inch. These dimensions are, of course, given as examples and are susceptible to variation and change, but it has been found that pile carpeting with these approximate specifications possesses the desirable steel wool cushioning and engaging characteristics for the floor cleaning implement. The ribbed surface is preferred to a flat surface so that dirt and other foreign matter that may come into contact with the carpeting may accumulate in the spaces 'I from where vit easily may bel dislodged. Furthermore, the Vribbed surface provides a somewhat more resilient or cushioning backing than a flat surface. The back of the carpeting preferably is treated with a sizing, such as a resinous composition which is insoluble in the presence of the floor cleaning composition and serves to prevent unravelling or deterioration of the carpet in use.

The fibers 3 also may be provided by making the backing member 2 in the form of a conventional scrubbing brush, having regularly arranged tufts 8 of fiber bristles set in a wood back, as shown in Figure 5. The bristles should be of a length to prevent their flattening out in use, and to provide some rigidity at the' ends which are in contact and engagement with the steel wool 4. The length of the bristles also should be such as to maintain suiiicient resiliency for a proper cushioning backing for the steel wool. We have found that about one-half inch in length is preferable for ordinary bristles, this length being about one-half the length of bristles of a conventional scrubbing brush. The longer bristle length, as compared to the pile tufts, is necessary because bristle fibers usually are much stiffer than pile bers, and the bristles must be long enough to provide sufficient flexibility for a cushioned backing. But the bristle length may be varied somewhat depending on the fineness of the bristles, which should be fine enough to engage and penetrate the steel wool 4 so as to frictionally retain the pad I in working position on the backing member 2 without relative slipping or sliding.

The top of the backing member 2 is provided with a handle 9 of sufcient length to enable the operator, while using it, to stand erect. The handle maybe attached to the backing member by a connecting member I 0 provided with a handle-receiving socket II and oppositely disposed transversely extending pivot pins I2. Bearing brackets I3 are fastened to the backing member 2, as by screws, and pivotally receive the pins I2, to secure the handle to the backing member for pivotal movement in a plane substantially normal thereto. The handle 9 may be fastened in the socket II by any conventional means, such as by friction, cement, or a bolt or screw I4, as shown, extending through aligned holes in the handle and the sides of the socket. It will be noted that the pivotal connection shown is sufficiently low to permit the handle to be brought almost in line with the plane of the backing member for reaching beneath low pieces vof furniture and the like. From this construction, it will be apparent that the implement" is intended to be used with a reciprocating motion. This back and forth action over the surface of the fioor is of substantial importance in the use of the implement, as will be explained later.

The replaceable pad assembly I (see Figure 2) preferably is substantially the same as that disclosed in the copending application of C. .Arthur Bruce and Frank H. Lyons, filed August 26, 1946, Serial No. 693,144, now U. S. Patent No. 2,497,206. The pad assembly I comprises a generally rectangular pad or mat of one or more layers of metallic Wool 4 Ahaving binding or attaching means secured to the ends thereof. The wool 4 may be' reinforced against separating or rolling up in use by one or more rows of stitching I5 extending transversely of the pad intermediate the ends thereof. The end binding means may be tabs I6 of relatively stiff sheet material which is folded over the ends of the wool pad and suitably secured thereto, Staples Il, as shown, are found to be practical. The ends of the wool pad also may be stiffened suitably by the application of fluid plastics such as synthetic resins which can be set by application of heat and pressure to consolidate the ends of the pad. The tabs I6 or stiifened end portions of the wool pad serve to assemble initially the pad in working position on the backing member, as will be' described later.

The metallic wool 4 preferably is steel wool of No. 00 to No. l grade, or a mixture of several such grades. Steel wool is particularly effective when used'with cleaning compositions of the wax and petroleum and/or coal tar solvents type. But it will be understood, however, that for use with aqueous cleaning liquids, any non-rusting metallic wool having properties similar to those of steel wool may be used. The metallic wool pad preferably has two or more layers therein, in each of which the filaments are arranged generally or substantially in parallelism, as the result of a combing or like process. All the filaments are not exactly parallel, but extend generally in the same direction. Expressed in another manner, the pad may be said to have a grain. Commercial steel wool, purchased in rolls, usually has such a filamentary arrangement. The filaments of the working layer of the pad, i. e. the bottom layer if more than one layer is used, preferably extend generally at an angle of about 17 to the longitudinal centerline of the pad. It will be understood that the filaments are, therefore, at an angle to the direction of travel oi. the pad when in use, with the consequent benefits described in the aforementioned application Serial No. 693,144. This angle may be anywhere from 0 to about 30 and still obtain desirable results from the use of the pad. An angle of 0 prolongs the life of the pad but, whileeie'ctive, does ynot provide as much abrasive action as a largerangle. An angle of 30, on the other hand, while providing increased abrasive action, nearly reaches the point where this action becomes excessive, with consequent marring' of the floor finish. A 30 angle also nearly reaches the point where the filaments will unduly tear, separate, or roll up upon encountering a rough spot or obstruction on the surface of the floor. Therefore, `an angle of about 17 is preferred, but it will be understood that any angle between 0 and 30 may be used, since the filaments will then lie generally or substantially parallel to the direction of travel of the implement when in use.

When the pad has two or more layers of filaments, the filaments in one layer preferably lie at an angle to the filaments in the other layer, as described in the aforementioned application Serial No. 693,144, so that the cushioning backing fibers 3, in penetrating the layers of metallic filaments to some extent, will tend to interlock the filaments against fraying in use.

Surrounding the periphery of the backing member 2 is a collar-like binding strip I8 of material such as carpet, webbing, rubber or other elastic material, synthetic resin, etc. The strip I8 preferably is treated with sizing or like material which will prevent deterioration in the presence of the liquid cleaning compositions used, or the binding strip should be of material which will resist deterioration without such treatment. We lhave found Koroseal, a synthetic material (plasticized polyvinyl chloride) produced by the Goodyear Rubber Company, to be quite suitable. The binding should be stiff enough to retain the tabs I 6 of the pad in place as later described, but soft enough to provide a bumper cushion which prevents marring of furniture upon accidental contact of the implement therewith. As shown in the drawings, the binding strip has several peripheral ridges formed thereon, which both reinforce the strip and add to the bumper cushion effect described above. The binding strip I8 is approximately as wide as the thickness of the backing member 2 and is secured to thelongitudinal side faces thereof by tacks, glue, staples, or any other suitable means. Staples I9 are shown in the drawings as the securing means. The binding strip I8, prior to attachment to the backing member 2 is drawn tightly across the end faces thereof for a purpose later described. If the binding strip is formed of a relatively inelastic or non-stretchable material, it is desirable that some looseness be provided in the lower edges of those portions thereof which lie across the flat end faces of the backing member. The purpose of this looseness is described later. One

method of obtaining this looseness is to provide a lower offset 20 (see Figure 5) on thel longitudinal side faces of the backing member 2. AEquivalent methods of obtaining the desired looseness readily will be apparent. For the purpose intended, the binding stripY I8 need not surround the entire periphery of the backing member 2, but may consist of separate strips of material stretched across each end face of the backing member and secured to the opposite longitudinal side faces thereof. A binding 'surrounding the entire periphery is preferred, however, to provide a bumper cushion, as previously described.

The pad I is assembled on the backing member 2 by inserting thetabs IS into the spaces between the end faces of the backing member and the binding strip I8. The looseness of the lower por- 6 tionfth'e strip, wher'itcrossestheend faces of the backing member, both facilitates thisinsertion and allows space enough for the reception of the tabs I6, but at the same time the strip, particularly at the upper portions thereof, is tight enough to retain frictionally the tabs in place.

This engagement of the tabs I6 serves to position, initially, the pad I on the backing member 2; the fibers 3, of which, friction'ally engage the steel wool 4. The tabs I6 are somewhat wedgeshaped in cross-section because of the bulk of the steel wool 4 projecting along oneedge from be-l tween the double walls thereof. This wedge or V-shape of the tabs' I6, aids materially in inserting'and holding the tabs in place under the binding strip I8.

Still another feature of the replaceable pad assembly is that it is quite flexible and readily may be rolled up or folded, as shown in Figure 6, into a very small space and so conveniently packaged for sale as replacementarticles.

, In use, a quantity of liquid cleaning material is applied to an 'area of the licor and the implement is pushed back and forth over the surface of the area 'to be cleaned. The steel wool spreads the cleaning material evenly over the surface to becleaned, and, at the same time, gently abrades .and loosens the surface dirt and other foreign matter. Very little pressure of the implement on the floor is required other than the weight of the implement itself, exceptin spots relatively Imore soiled than the remaining area of the floor, thus making for ease of operation. Because the steel wool is substantially self-cleaning inthe presence of the solvent component of the cleaning material, upon completion of the spreading and simultaneous cleaning operatic-n, there usually will remain on the floor a thin film of cleaning material plus the loosened dirt. This easily may be removed by placing a cloth rag or other suitable waste on the floor' and rubbing the rag over the surface with the implement. This subsequent operation does not aimv to dry the floor completely, but `to leave it with some of the cleaner composition thereon, in order to obtain the benefit of the wax content of the cleaning composition. By empolying this method, it has been found that no rings or marked borders appear between overlapping cleaned areas,

While the implement has been described as being of marked value in the manual cleaning lof floors, the implement also has been found to have superior characteristics in the application of floor seals, waxes, and other non-'aqueous finishing and maintenance products to floors.

It will be realized that We have described a specific embodiment of our invention, but that we do not wish to be unduly limited thereby. Therefore, our invention embraces all modifications and embodiments as fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

l. A floor cleaning implement, the combination comprising; a backing member having a substantially flat undersurface, an operating handle pivotally secured to said member for movement in a plane normal to said surface, and a metallic wool pad det'achably secured to said backing member and overlying sa'id under'sur'face, said pad having at least one working layer of wool the laments of which are in substantially straight parallel arrangement andV extend in a direction generally parallel to said flat undersurface and lie at an angle of from 0 to about 30 to the plane of the pivotal movement of 'said handle.

212. `A doorcleaningl implement-the combina-v tion comprising; a rigid backing-member having a substantially flat undersurfaca resilient bers secured to said -member and projecting out-- Wardly fromn said undersurfaca an operating handle pivotally secured to vsaid member for movement -ina-planenormal to said surface, and a metallic wool pad detachably secured to-said backing member vinI overlying engagement 'with said fibers,` said padY having at least one lworking layer of Wool the filaments of which are in generally straight parallel arrangement and extend in a direction substantially parallel to said undersurface and lie atan angle of from to about 30 to the-.plane ofthe'V pivotal movement of` said handle.

3. A door cleaning implement as set 'forth in claim 2 in which the fibers comprise the pile of carpeting secured to the undersurface of the backing member.

4. A floor cleaning implement as set forth in claim 2 in which the backing member and cushioning fibers are in the form of a bristle brush. Y

5. A floor cleaning implement, the combination comprising; ak rigid backing member having a substantially dat undersuriace, cut pile carpeting secured to said-surface with the pile projecting outwardly therefrom, an operating handle pivotally secured to said member for movement 'in a plane normal tosaid surface, and a metallic Wool pad detachably secured to said backing member-in overlying engagement with said carpeting, said pad having` atleast :one working layer of wool the lilaments of which are. arranged generally in parallelism.L and extend in an angular direction lof from.0 to about 30 to the plane of the pivotal movement'of saidihandle.

6. A vfloor cleaning implement as set forth in claim 5 invwhich. the pile' of the carpeting is arranged in vspaced,substantially parallel rows forming a series of spacedtufted ribs extending transversely of the filaments of the working layer of wool ofthe pad.

7.- The structure set forthin claim ll in which the pad binding means comprises folded tabs with the said edges of thepad secured within the folds of the tabs.

8. A licor 'cleaning implement, the combination comprising; an oblong, substantially flat rigid backingl member; exible cushioning fibers secured to said member and projecting outwardly from the undersurface thereof, an operating handle pivotally secured to said backing member for movementina longitudinally disposed plane normal to said membeneach of the oppositev end faces of said member having strip means of relatively flexlble'material extending transversely v thereacross `and secured to said member, and an oblong metallic Wool pad detachably secured to said member in overlying engagement with the ends of said bers, `said pad having at leastone working layer of wool the filaments of which are arranged generally in parallelism and extend in an angular direction of from 0 to about 30 to the longitudinal axis of said backing member, and binding means stiiening the opposite ends of said pad, said ends being adapted to be inserted between said strip means and said end faces to secure detachably said pad on said member.

9. A oor cleaning implement, the combination comprising: a rigid backing member, means secured to said member providing a substantially at, rough, cushioning surface on the underside thereof, an operating-:handle pivotally secured tosaid member-.for movement ina vplane normal to said suriace,and a metallic wool pad detachably secured to said backing member in overlying engagement with said surface, said pad having at least one working layer of wool, the laments of which are in substantially straight parallel arrangement and lie in planesgenerally parallel to said flat surface,the^directional orientation of said laments relative to the plane of the pivotal movement of said handle being an angle of from 0 to about 30. v s l 10. A oor cleaning implement, the combination comprising:y a generally rectangular, rigid backing member having a substantially at undersurface; anoperating handle pivotally secured to'said member for movement relative thereto in a plane substantially normal to two opposite edges thereof; and a generally rectangular, metallic wool pad overlying said undersurface, the two opposite marginal edge portions of said pad adjacent said opposite edges of said backing member being detachably secured to said member and said pad having at least one Working layer of wool theiilaments of whichare in substantially straight parallel arrangement, lie in planes generally parallelto Asaid undersurface, and extend in an angular direction of from about 60 to 90 to said opposite edges of said member.

11. A oor cleaning implement, vthe combination comprising: a generally rectangular, rigid backing member having a'substantially iiat undersurface; an operating' handle pivotally secured to said member forA movement relative thereto in a plane substantially normal to two opposite edges thereof; means denning slots associated with said member adjacent and parallelfto and extending substantially the length of said opposite edges; a vgenerally rectangular, metallic wool pad overlying said undersurfaee, said pad havingat least one Working layer of wool the filaments of which are in substantially straight parallel arrangement, lie in planes generally parallel to said undersurface, and extend in an angular direction of from about 60 to 90 to said opposite member edges; and binding means stiiening the two opposite edge portions of said pad adjacent said opposite member edges, said stiiened pad edge portions being adapted to be inserted in said slots to detachably secure said pad to said backing member.

12. A floor cleaning implement, the combination comprising: a generally rectangular, rigid backing member having a substantially flat undersurface; an operating handle pivotally secured to said member for movement relative thereto in a plane substantially normal to two opposite peripheral faces thereof; strip means of flexible material overlying the length oi each of said'faces and secured to said member; a generally rectangular, metallic wool pad overlying said undersurface, said pad having at least one working layer of wool the laments of which are in substantially straight parallel arrangenient, lie in planes generally parallel to said undersurface, and aredirectionally oriented at an angle of from -0` to about 30 to the plane of movement of said handle; binding means stiflening the two opposite edge portions of said pad adjacent said opposite peripheral faces, said stiliened pad edge portions being adapted to be in serted between said strip means and said opposite peripheral faces to detachably secure said pad on said backing member. y l

13. Ina licor cleaning implement assembly 9 the combination of a generally rectangular, rigid backing member having a substantially flat undersurface and a handle pvotally secured thereto for movementl in a plane substantially normal to two opposite edges thereof; a generally rectangular, substantially flat pad of metallic Wool having at least one Working layer of wool the laments of which are in substantially straight parallel arrangement, lie in planes substantially parallel to the plane of the pad, and extend in an angular direction of from about 60 to 90 to two opposite edges of said pad; and means for detaehably securing said pad to said backing member to overlie said undersurfaee thereof with said opposite pad edges disposed substantially l5 parallel to said opposite edges of said member.

FRANK H. LYONS. JACOB F. FERDON.

l@ REFERENCES cifrato The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 650,237 Gnutzmann May 22, 1900 1,012,281 Schebel Dec. 19, 1911 1,519,577 Easton Dec. 16, 1924 1,540,987 Heintz June 9, 1925 1,632,481 Judge June 14, 1927 1,822,395 Fish Sept. 8, 1931 2,123,388 Martin July 12, 1938 2,140,578 Goodloe Dee. 20, 1938 2,308,568 Rogers Jan. 19, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 165,458 Switzerland Feb. 1, 1934

Patent Citations
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US1012281 *Oct 19, 1911Dec 19, 1911Arthur SchiebelCombination-brush.
US1519577 *Mar 15, 1924Dec 16, 1924Easton Jr Henry PCleaning and abrading device
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US1632481 *Mar 26, 1925Jun 14, 1927Judge Joseph SWaxer and polisher
US1822395 *Apr 3, 1926Sep 8, 1931Emerson S SearleHolder for steel wool
US2123338 *Dec 30, 1935Jul 12, 1938Williams CompanySteel wool pad
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2813291 *Aug 23, 1955Nov 19, 1957Marian E WarkCleaning apparatus
US4380092 *Feb 26, 1981Apr 19, 1983Brothers Woodrow WAccessory for using steel wool or other abrading materials
US20130019423 *Dec 23, 2010Jan 24, 2013Afl Telecommunications LlcBristle based fiber optic connector cleaner
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/231, 15/229.13, 15/111
International ClassificationA47L13/10, A47L13/29
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/29
European ClassificationA47L13/29