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Publication numberUS2500841 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1950
Filing dateJun 1, 1948
Priority dateJun 1, 1948
Publication numberUS 2500841 A, US 2500841A, US-A-2500841, US2500841 A, US2500841A
InventorsFellman Evan L, Stewart Jr Walter G
Original AssigneeE L Bruce Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor cleaning device
US 2500841 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

arch 1950 E. FELLMA'N ETAL FLOOR CLEANING DEVICE Filed June 1, 1948 EVA/V L. FELL MAN Arum/Er."

Patented Mar. l4, 1 950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE FLOOR CLEANING DEVICE Application June 1, 1948, Serial No. 30,294

11 Claims.

This invention relates to a simple form of floor cleaning and maintenance device and more particularly is an improvement on the floor cleaning implement disclosed in the copending application of Frank H. Lyons, and Jacob F. Ferdon, Serial No. 740,550, filed April 10, 1947. The floor cleaning implement disclosed in the aforementioned application comprises a handled rigid backing member having a cushioning fibrous under surface and a metallic wool pad detachably secured to the backing member in overlying frictional engagement with said under surface. The implement is used in conjunction with liquid cleaning and maintaining compositions on the surface of wood, linoleum, and other floors. The cleaning composition with which the implement is intended to be used includes a wax or waxes suspended in petroleum and/or coal tar solvents and is nonaqueous in character.

Although the above described device has proved to be highly efiicient and satisfactory for the use intended, we have found that equivalent results are obtained with our implement, which not only can be manufactured more easily but also more cheaply. Among the improvements of our implement may be mentioned a lower cost of manufacturing the cushioning under surface and the use of a smaller quantity of binding strip material, which is employed to secure the wool pad to the backing member.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a floor cleaning implement, of the type described, with a backing member having relatively inexpensive cushioning means that effectively frictionally engages the metallic wool pad.

Another object of this invention is to provide a floor cleaning implement of the type described that employs a minimum amount of binding strip material.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improved floor cleaning device that may be manufactured easily and cheaply.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a partially exploded perspective view of the component parts of a floor cleaning device which embodies this invention.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the assembled device. A part of the implement is cutaway and another part is shown in an intermediate stage'of assembly in order to show details more clearly.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary view showing several modifications of an element of the device;

Referring now to-the drawings, it will be" seen III that the floor cleaning implement of this invention comprises two main parts namely, a replaceable metallic wool pad assembly, indicated generally at It in Figure 1, and a handled rigid backing member, indicated generally at l l in Figure 2. The pad Ill and backing member I l are shown as generally rectangular in shape. This shape is not critical, however, but merely preferable.

The backing member I l comprises a plate-like member I2 formed of sheet metal, preferabl a strong light metal, such as light gauge sheet steel. The member l2 has separate depending side and end flanges l3 and I4, respectively, of substantially equal depth. These depending flanges form a cavity l5 beneath the plate-like member l2. Fitted in the cavity I5 is a block it of relatively stifi fibrous material which is somewhat resilient and has a rather rough yielding surface that results from its fibrous composition. We have found that fiber board, made from compressed coarse cellulose fibers is a suitable material. Examples of such fiber board are Celotex, which is made from bagasse, and Masonite, which is made from exploded wood fibers. In addition, we have found balsa wood to be a satisfactory material for the block Hi. The block, when formed of such materials, is relatively rigid yet light in weight, somewhat resilient, and also has a yielding surface; Furthermore, such material is inexpensive. The thickness of the block I6 is slightlygreater than the depth' of the cavity l5 so that the block projects slightl therefrom.

It has'been found that the combination of a layer of metallic wool backed by fiber board, balsa wood or other material having the desirable characteristics outlined above, possesses desirable characteristics for a floor cleaning implement for use with many of the available liquid floor cleaning compositions. The metallic wool not only provides a mild abrasive action that is necessary to thoroughly loosen the surface dirt, but, being, non-absorbent of the cleaning composition used, does not becomes unduly matted and caked with dirt and other foreign matter in use. The yielding somewhat rough surface of the fibrous backing material interengages the wool filaments to retain the wool pad in fiat working position on the implement without relative slipping or sliding. Furthermore, such interengagement prevents the wool from separating and rolling up in use, thus effectively preserving the useful life of the pad. At the same time, the fibrous-backing material provides a cushion for the wool pad that is sumciently resilient to preclude the latter from marring the finish of the floor, while permitting the wool to reach and clean all surface depressions or uneven spots that may be found on a floor. It also has been found that even though such a fibrous backing absorbs the liquid cleaning composition to some extent, the solvents in the composition rapidly evaporate leaving a residue which is not detrimental to the effectiveness of the backing. Furthermore, the backing is self cleaning in that evaporation of the solvents of the absorbed cleaning composition releases any dirt and other foreign matter that has been mixed with the composition. Accordingly, the backing material does not deteriorate in use.

The end flanges I4 of theplate-like member l2' have extensions I! that project beyond the ends of the side flanges I3 and are folded back against the outer face or the side flanges (asshown in Figure 2). Each extension IIhas a struck-out inwardly extending spur I8. The spurs I8 project through corresponding openings I9 in the The top of the plate-like member I2 is provided with apivotally attached handle 20 of sufiicient length to enable the operator of the implement, while using it, to stand erect. The handle 20 is attached to the member 12 by a connecting member 2| provided with a handle receiving socket 22 and a transverse pivot pin 23. Bearing brackets 24, which are fastened to the member I2, as by bolts or rivets 25, receive the opposite ends of the pivot pin 23. The handle 20 may be secured in the socket 22 by any conventional means, but preferably cooperating threads are provided on both elements for ready attachment and detachment. Thus, the handle 20 is secured to the platelike member I2 for pivotal movement in a longitudinal plane. The sheet metal member l2 may haveribs 26 stamped therein to provide-added stiffness. From this construction, it is evident that the implement is intended to be used with a reciprocating motion, which is of substantial importance, as later explained.

The replaceable pad assembly IIl =preferably is substantially the same as that disclosed in the copending application of C. Arthur Bruce and Frank H. Lyons, filed August 26,1946, Serial No. 693,144., now Patent No. 2,497,206, issued Feb; 14, 1950, to which reference is made for a more detailed description. In general, the pad assembly comprises a substantially rectangular pad or mat of one or more layers of metallic wool 21. The

wool 21 may be reinforced against separating or rolling up in use by several rows of transverse stitching 28. Each end of the pad has binding or stiffening means applied thereto to enable the pad to be attached in working position on the backing member II. As shown in the drawings, the binding means comprises tabs 29 of relatively stiff sheet material, such as cardboard or the like, which are folded over the ends of the wool pad, and suitably secured thereto, as by stitching or staples 3Il. steel wool of N0. 00. grade, although any grade from No. 00 to No. 1, or a mixture of such grades, will produce effective results. Woolof non-rusting metals may be employed, however, inthe event-that aqueouscleaning'compositions are to The metallic wool 21 preferably is til be used therewith. The filaments of each layer of wool in the pad are arranged generally in parallelism and each layer is so oriented that the filaments thereof extend substantially longitudinally of the pad. Preferably, the filamentary angle is about 17 to the longitudinal, for reasons explained more fully in both of the aforementioned copending applications. If the pad has two or more layers of wool, the filaments in one layer preferably lie at an angle to the filaments in the adjacent layer.

Overlying the outer face of each end flange I4 is a flexible binding strip 3|. The strip 3i preferably is of material that will not deteriorate in the presence of the liquid cleaning composition used or else is treated, as with sizing or the like, to prevent such deterioration. It has been found that Koroseal, a synthetic material (plasticized polyvinyl chloride) produced by the B. F. Goodrich Company is quite suitable. The binding strip material should provide sufficient friction to retain the tabs 29 of the pad I9 in place, as later described, and be resilient enough to provide a bumper cushion, in order to prevent marring of furniture upon accidental contact of the implement therewith, during its reciprocating movement over the surface of afioor. Each binding strip 3i is approximately as wide as the depth of the end flanges l4 and has only its ends secured to the end flanges. The end of each strip 3i extends around the end of the corresponding flange extension IT and is impaled on the spur I8 thereon, as shown in Figure 2, thus securing the strip ends between the flange extensions and the side flanges I3. The strip ends may be tapered in width, as shownin Figure 1, or generally narrower than the intermediate portion of the strip in order to conceal the ends completely behind the flange extensions Il.

Before the component parts of the backing member II are assembled, the flange extensions N form straight continuations of the end flanges I4, as shown in Figure 1. Prior to affixing the bindingstrips in place, the extensions H are bent out of line from the side flanges I3 and into the angular position'shown on the left side of Figure 2. The strips 3! are then positioned over'the'end flanges and the strip ends folded around the flange extensions I'l and impaled on the spurs I8. After the block I6 has been fitted into the cavity I5, the flange extensions I'I'are bent back and folded against the outerface of the side flanges I3. This folding of the extensions I'I causes the spurs It to pass through the openings I9 and penetrate the block I6 to-retain the latter in the cavity I5. At the same time, the strips 3| are stretched with uniform tension tightly across the outer face of the end flanges 14 for a purpose later described.

The pad assembly I!) is detachably-assembled on the backing member by inserting the tabs 29 between the binding strips 3| and the underlying end fianges I4, as shown in'Figure 2; The tightness of the strips and their friction against the tabs is sufficientto retain the pad in working position when the entire implement is raised from the floor.

In use, a quantity of the liquid cleaning material, with which the'implement is intended to be used, is applied'to an area of the floor. The implement isthen pushed'back and forth over the surface of the area to be cleaned. The steel wool spreads the cleaning materialevenly over the surface, and'at the same time, gently abrades and'loosens the surface dirt an'd'other foreign matter. Because the steel wool is substantially self-cleaning in the presence of the solvent component of the cleaning composition, completion of the simultaneous spreading and cleaning operation usually leaves a thin film of the cleaning material plus loosened dirt on the floor. The dirt and excess cleaning composition easily may be removed by wiping the area with a rag or other suitable waste placed under the implement. This subsequent operation does not aim to dry the floor completely, but to leave some of the cleaning composition thereon in order to obtain the benefit of the wax content of the composition. After the floor is dry, the wax film remaining thereon may be lightly polished with the implement using a dry steel wool pad. This final operation imparts a glossy sheen to the surface of the floor.

While the implement has been described as of marked value in the manual cleaning of floors, it also possesses superior characteristics for the application of floor seals, waxes, and other nonaqueous finishing and maintenance materials to floors. In addition, the implement has been found to be effective for polishing waxed floors.

Although the invention has been disclosed with reference to a specific embodiment, various changes will be apparent to a person skilled in the art. Therefore, the invention embraces all modifications that come within the spirit and scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. A floor cleaning implement comprising: a substantially fiat rigid member having depending peripheral flanges to provide a cavity therebeneath; a handle attaching means pivotally secured to the back of said member; a substantially flat block of stiff fibrous cushioning material secured in said cavity, said block being of a thickness which approximates the depth of said cavity; and a flat pad of metallic wool detachably secured to said member in overlying engagement with the outer face of said block, the fibrous and cushioning characteristics of said block providing the outer face thereof with a rough yielding surface for interengagement of the filaments of said pad therewith over substantially the entire area of contact therebetween, whereby relative slipping between the wool of said pad and the outer face of said block is prevented and the wool of said pad is prevented from rolling up in use. Y

2. A floor cleaning implement comprising: a substantially fiat rigid member having a handle pivotally secured to the back thereof for movement in a plane normal thereto; a substantially fiat block of cushioning fiberboard secured on the under side of said member, and a flat pad of metallic wool detachably secured to said member in overlying engagement with the outer face of said block, said pad having at least one working layer of wool, the filaments of said layer being arranged generally in parallelism and extending substantially parallel to the plane of pivotal movement of said handle, the fibrous and cushioning characteristics of said block providing the outer face thereof with a rough yielding surface for interengagement of the filaments of said pad therewith over substantially the entire area of contact therebetween, whereby relative slipping between the wool of said pad and the outer face of said block is prevented and the wool of said pad is prevented from rolling up in use.

3. A floor cleaning implement comprising: a

substantially rectangular rigid plate-like member having depending side and end flanges to form a cavity therebeneath; a handle secured to the back of said member for pivotal movement in a longitudinal plane; a block of cushioning fiberboard secured in said cavity, said block being of a thickness at leastas great as the depth of said cavity; and a substantially rectangular flat pad of metallic wool detachably secured to said member in overlying frictional engagement with the outer face of said block, said pad having at least one working layer of wool, the filaments of said layer being arranged generally in parallelism and extending substantially longitudinall of said member, the fibrous and cushioning characteristics of said block providing the outer face thereof with a rough yielding surface for interengagement of the filaments of said pad therewith over substantially the entire area of contact therebetween, whereby relative slipping between the wool of said pad and the outer face of said block is prevented and the wool of said pad is prevented from rolling up in use.

4. In a floor cleaning implement having a pad of metallic wool detachably secured to the under surface of a handled backing element, said backing element comprising: a rigid plate-like member having depending separate peripheral flanges to form a cavity therebeneath, said flanges being arranged in opposite pairs; deformable flange extensions on both ends of the flanges of one of said pairs; a lateral spur on the inner side of each said flange extensions; a block of cushioning fiberboard fitted in said cavity, said block being of a thickness approximately the same as the depth of said cavity, said flange extensions being disposed flat against the outer faces of adjacent said peripheral flanges with said spurs extending therethrough and into penetrating and retaining engagement with said block.

5. A floor cleaning implement comprising: a substantially rectangular sheet metal member having depending separate side flanges to form a cavity therebeneath, deformable flange extensions on both ends of the flanges of one opposite pair of said flanges; a spur on the inner side of each said flange extensions; a block of cushioning fiberboard fitted in said cavity, said block being of a thickness at least as great as the depth of said cavity, said flange extensions bein disposed flat againstthe outer faces of the other pair of said side flanges with said spurs extending therethrough and into penetrating and retaining engagement with said block; and a pad of metallic wool detachably secured to said member in overlying frictional engagement with the outer face of said block.

6. In a floor cleaning implement having a pad of metallic wool, provided with binding means to stiffen opposite edges thereof, detachably secured to the unler surface of a backing element, said backing element comprising: a rigid platelike sheet metal member having depending separate peripheral flanges that form a cavity beneath said member, said flanges being arranged in opposite pairs; deformable flange extensions on both ends of the flanges of one said pairs; a spur on the inner side of each said flange extensions; a block of cushioning fiberboard fitted in said cavity, said block being of a thickness at least as great as the depth of said cavity; and a flexible strip of non-metallic material overlying the outer face of each flange of said one pair with the ends of said strip extending; around the ends of the corresponding flange extensions and secured to the spurs thereon, said extensions being disposed flat against the outer faces of adjacent, said peripheral flanges with said spurs extending therethrough and into penetrating and retaining engagement with said block, whereby the stiflfened edges. of the pad may be inserted between said strips and their underlying flanges to detachably; secure said pad to said member inoverlying frictional engage,- ment with the outer face: ofsaid block;

7. The structure defined by claim 6, in which the end; portions; of the flexible strips which extend, behind the flange extensions are generally of less width, than the intermediate portion of said strips.

8. The structure defined by claim 6 in which the-spurs are of arrowhead shape.

9. A floor cleaning implement comprising: a substantially rectangular sheet metal member having integral depending separate side and end flanges to form a cavity therebeneath; a handle secured to the back of said member for pivotal movement in a longitudinal plane; deformable flange extensions on both ends of said end flanges; a spur on the, inner side of each said flange extensions; a block: of cushioning fiberboard fitted in said cavity, said block-being of a thickness at least as great as the depth of said cavity; a flexible strip of non-metallic material overlying the outer face of each said end flanges with the ends of said strips extending around the ends ofthe corresponding said flange extensions and impaled on the spurs thereon, said extensions being disposed flat against the outerfaces of said side flanges with said spursextending therethrough and into penetrating and retaining engagement with said block; and a substantially rectangular pad of metallic wool in overlying frictional engagement with the outer face of said block, said pad having binding means to stiffen the end edges thereof, and said edges being inserted between said strips and their underlying flanges to detachably secure said pad to said member.

10. In a floor cleaning implement having a pad of metallic wool, provided with binding meansto stiffen opposite edges thereof,- detach.- ably secured to the under surface of a backing element, said backing element comprising: a rigid plate-like sheet metal member having depending separate peripheral flanges that form. a cavity beneath said member, said flanges being arranged in opposite. pairs; deformable flange extensions on both ends of the flanges of one of said pairs; a spur on the inner side of each said flange extensions; a block of cushioning fiberboardsecured in said cavity, said blockbe ing of1a thickness at least as great as the depth of said cavity; and a flexible strip of non-metallic material overlying the, outer face of each flange of saidone pair with the ends of said strips extending around the ends of the correspondin flange extensions, secured to. the spurs thereon and said extensions being disposed flat against the outer faces of adjacent said peripheral flanges with said spurs extending therethrough, whereby the stiffened edges of the. pad may be. inserted between. said strips and their underlying flanges to detachably secure said pad to said member in overlying frictional engagement with the outer face of said block.

11. A floor cleaning. implement comprising: a substantially rectangular sheet metal member having integral dependin separate side-and end flanges to form a cavity therebeneath; a handle securedto the back of said member for pivotal movement in a longitudinal plane; deformable flange extensions on both ends of said end flanges; a spur on the inner side of each said flange extensions; a block of cushioning fiberboard secured in, said cavity, said block being of a thickness approximating the depth of said cavity; a flexible strip of non-metallic material overlying the outer face of each said end flanges with the ends of said strips extending around the ends of the corresponding said flange extensions and impaled on the spurs thereon, said. extensions being disposed flat againstv the outer faces of. said side flanges withsaid spurs extending therethrough; and a substantially rectangular pad of metallic wool in overlying frictional engagement with the outer face of said block, said pad having binding means to stiffen the end edges thereof, and said edges being inserted between said strips and their underlying flanges to detachably secure said pad to said member.

EVAN L. FELLMAN. WALTER G. STEWART, JR.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the flle of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Stetson Dec. 8,

Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,500,841 March 14, 1950 EVAN L. FELLMAN ET AL.

It is hereby certified that errors appear in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows:

Column 2, line 43, for the word becomes read become; column 6, line 62, for

unler read under; column 8, line 7, before secured insert and; line 8, for thereon and read thereon and that the said Letters Patent should be read with these corrections therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Ofiice.

Signed and sealed this 27th day of June, A. D. 1950.

THOMAS F. MURPHY,

Assistant Uommz'ssz'oner of Patents.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2735124 *Mar 30, 1951Feb 21, 1956 Device for finishing floors
US2919457 *May 10, 1956Jan 5, 1960Lockport Mills IncDust mop with replaceable dusting material
US5507065 *Dec 10, 1993Apr 16, 1996Mcbride; JohnCleanroom washing system
US5609255 *May 31, 1995Mar 11, 1997Nichols; Sally S.Washable scrubbing mop head and kit
US5678278 *Sep 26, 1995Oct 21, 1997Mcbride; JohnCleanroom washing system
US8695150 *May 16, 2011Apr 15, 2014Christopher CooperTablet computer cleaning device
DE820472C *Apr 18, 1950Nov 12, 1951Metallwerk Oscar WeilMatte aus Stahlwolle
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/231, D32/50, 15/228
International ClassificationA47L13/10, A47L13/29
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/29
European ClassificationA47L13/29